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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:38 pm 
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I recently visited the National Archives II at College Park and found this memorandum in their files:

The money quote(s):

Quote:
2. The extensive use of the B-24 is inconsistent with the blunt fact that it is the most extravagant killer of any airplane in the AAF. Since Pearl Harbor through September 1944, B-24 accidents in the U.S. have resulted in 2,188 fatalities. In the first 9 months of 1944. B-24s did only 6% of total flying in the U.S. but accounted for 26% of all fatalities. They flew 5% less than B-17's but had 105% more fatalities and 85% more wrecks.

3. Had the B-24 had as good an accident rate as the B-17 during the period 7 December 1941 through September 1944, there would have been a saving of 230 aircraft wrecked, 904 lives, and approximately $60,000,000.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 5:47 pm 
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And they called the Marauder "Widow-maker"...


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 2:32 am 
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Which partly explains the rapid exit from service of the B-24 at the end of WW2, with the exception of the heavily modified Privateer.

Jonathan


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:56 am 
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JBG wrote:
Which partly explains the rapid exit from service of the B-24 at the end of WW2, with the exception of the heavily modified Privateer.

Jonathan


I think so; it also explains why the B-24 was so unpopular; one can be sure the crews noted the accidents and loss rates. It's interesting to note that the B-24 was also cursed as a very hard aircraft to fly, it couldn't hold course and speed without constant attention and minor adjustments. That made it very hard for the crews to keep in tight formation which may also have contributed to the loss rate.

The B-32 also had a very bad reputation as a temperamental hangar queen which may be due to its B-24 lineage.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 9:29 am 
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They wouldn't include the B-24 derivated transport airplane, the C-87, in those numbers, right?

For what I've read in 'Fate is the Hunter' the C-87 is probably one of the worst airplanes to fly.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 11, 2008 7:37 pm 
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FlyingDutchman wrote:
They wouldn't include the B-24 derivated transport airplane, the C-87, in those numbers, right?

For what I've read in 'Fate is the Hunter' the C-87 is probably one of the worst airplanes to fly.

The document specifies that the totals reported cover bomber, trainer, export, and recce versions of the Liberator, and even the handful of XB-41 "escort bombers." I can't think of a reason why the C-87 would not have been likewise called out if its figures were also included in those totals, so I'd guess that they're not.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 10:13 am 
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Bump.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 1:01 pm 
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The PB-4Y must have been a better flyer. The last ones weren't retired from firefighting service until after a crash in 2002. We had a couple of them in what I referred to as the "Flying Museum" at Ft. Wainwright in the early 70s.

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 10, 2017 4:50 pm 
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edgeplay_cgo wrote:
The PB-4Y must have been a better flyer. The last ones weren't retired from firefighting service until after a crash in 2002. We had a couple of them in what I referred to as the "Flying Museum" at Ft. Wainwright in the early 70s.

It's interesting to note that the PB4Y-2 Privateer has the Honking Huge Single Tail that premiered on the B-24N.

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If the N had been developed earlier (the XB-24K - the first single-tailed Liberator - flew in late 1943, the XB-24N was delivered in November 1944, post-dating this survey, and only seven YB-24Ns were completed before the whole project was cancelled due to V-E Day), it's an interesting question if the statistics here might have been different.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2017 3:54 pm 
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edgeplay_cgo wrote:
The PB-4Y must have been a better flyer. The last ones weren't retired from firefighting service until after a crash in 2002. We had a couple of them in what I referred to as the "Flying Museum" at Ft. Wainwright in the early 70s.

The single tail is said to have done wonders for the handling. Also, the B-24 was supposed to be especially troublesome at high altitudes and (as previously mentioned) in close formation; the MARPAT role of the PB4Y demanded neither of those.

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