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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 8:28 pm 
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The blurb for this book claims "Sisters of the Revolution gathers a highly curated selection of feminist speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy, horror, and more) ". Being an inquisitive contrarian I decided to read it. Some of the stories in this book, which spans 40 years of selections, are very good. The best was The Woman who thought she was a planet, a nice and funny little fantasy about an old Indian lady who became a planet. Most of the humour comes from the reactions of her rather stuffy husband.

It also features "The Screwfly Solution" by James Tiptree Jr. A very good story.

But, I am baffled. To qualify as feminist it would appear that a story has to be written by someone who is or purports to be female, and has a female protagonist or narrator. In a significant proportion menstruation gets a mention (why all this fuss about two tablespoons of blood, as Greer once said). The screwfly solution is narrated by a passive female, and frankly you could search and replace every female with a male and vice versa and it would be the same story. That applies to many of the stories.

The first story is the worst, a tedious bit of politically correct sub kafka.

There's also a rather uninteresting counterfactual by the usually excellent Le Guin, postulating an all female expedition to the South Pole preceeding Scott and Amundsen (I think) , using Amundsen's methods and relying on perfect weather. It's all a jolly lark.

Spoiler: there's also a story about breastfeeding. It sounds like the usual real life problems, with the amazingly hilarious twist that she gives her husband her boobs in his sleep. That's it. Two sentences at the end of the story turn it into SF rather than a whining diary.

So, read it for the stories. By the way the curators (anthologists in a less pretentious world) badly need to learn to write.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 7:58 pm 
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If someone wants to read feminist SF, they don't have to go far in the early and middle years. E.E. Doc Smith and Heinlein both have very strong women. Touched by the attitudes of the times, but very strong.

{Grabbing Podkayne of Mars off the shelf}

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 9:55 am 
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Sad part is this second-rate collection will be wildly applauded by the FemLitCrits, sell like hot-cakes.

Meanwhile, the SciFi & Fantasy community, which includes some very, very good writers who happen to be female, will shake their heads sadly...

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:34 am 
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KDahm wrote:
If someone wants to read feminist SF, they don't have to go far in the early and middle years. E.E. Doc Smith and Heinlein both have very strong women. Touched by the attitudes of the times, but very strong.

{Grabbing Podkayne of Mars off the shelf}


Ahhh. The Clarisson genes...

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2017 10:37 pm 
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Against that sluts in a strange land and time for sex, as two of Heinlein s works were referred to at uni.


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