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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2017 7:04 pm 
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Has anyone read this? http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-eig ... 0156809868

Amazon pulled it "due to quality issues."

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 9:25 am 
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I don't recognise this author, but I remember a truly ghastly '8th Day-ish' novel, which must have been dictated against a contract deadline while high on 'phetamines & coffee. It seemed to have half the Wiki Conspiracy entries copy/pasted then quoted (!!!), with characters cut from a cereal box, plot on the back of a postage stamp and less continuity than a dotted line...

Funny thing is, edited down, it would have made a fun novella. Instead, it grew like kudsu into something I threw across the room after a few chapters...

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 26, 2017 10:42 am 
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Harold Coyle is probably best known for Team Yankee, although Sword Point, Bright Star, and The Ten Thousand were pretty good too.

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PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 6:39 am 
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bekosh wrote:
Harold Coyle is probably best known for Team Yankee, although Sword Point, Bright Star, and The Ten Thousand were pretty good too.


Also "Trial By Fire" and "Code of Honor"

"Team Yankee" uses Sir John Hackett's two future histories about World War Three as a background, with his novel focussing on the company-level war of an armour-heavy task force.

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PostPosted: Fri May 12, 2017 7:18 am 
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I think the "Ten Thousand" was the last novel of his I actually read.

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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 7:04 am 
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Last one I read was Code of Honor. I did recently buy the 'revised' edition of Team Yankee. It was about 95% the same.

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Adrian Carton de Wiart, VC wrote:
Frankly I had enjoyed the war...and why do people want peace if the war is so much fun?


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 3:14 pm 
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Bernard Woolley wrote:
Last one I read was Code of Honor. I did recently buy the 'revised' edition of Team Yankee. It was about 95% the same.


What's revised?


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 5:05 pm 
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Other than the price? Almost nothing.

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Adrian Carton de Wiart, VC wrote:
Frankly I had enjoyed the war...and why do people want peace if the war is so much fun?


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 1:21 am 
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It's been a while since I last read it, but I don't remember anything wrong in it that needed revising.

Second best "tanks in WW3 book" that I've read; the best being Chieftains https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1468180959/ ... gzb3X59EG0


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 2:44 am 
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I'm not too sure what the point of the 'revision' was other than making money out of mugs like me.

Chieftains is awesome. The ending is still a shock every time I read it. In terms of grittiness it makes Team Yankee look like a walk in the park.

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Adrian Carton de Wiart, VC wrote:
Frankly I had enjoyed the war...and why do people want peace if the war is so much fun?


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 3:20 am 
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In fairness, the ending of "Chieftains" reads a bit as if the author had run out of ideas and killed off everybody.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 4:08 am 
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I thought that was Soviet doctrine at the time; 3 days to win the tank battles otherwise tactical nukes all round?


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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 5:24 pm 
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Team Yankee is the high point in Coyle's writing.

Sword Point is silly.
Bright Star is decent and readable
Trial By Fire is actually pretty good
The Ten Thousand takes suspension of disbelief, wads it up, and throws it on a pyre. It's almost worth reading for the cliches, characterization, and the absolutely dreadful plot. About the only good thing it has are tanks shooting at each other, and there are far better novels to read that.
Code of Honor is so-so, but the repeating characters have worn thin, the doctrine straight out of the Tropes pages, and the new characters are cardboard cutouts.

I stopped reading him after that, the writing was so bad. Like the Stephan Coonts series and Dale Brown's works, an initial promising start soon devolved into dreck, competing only for the amount of Wunderwaffe that could be incorporated as well as the hero going from ordinary person with a problem to an Uber-mensch capable of outperforming Batman and Superman. And the repeated and gross violations of doctrine and operations research makes rereading them now almost painful.

The question a reader might ask themselves to determine the quality of the author is to take the leading military character and determine what sort of personnel evaluation they would write. All to often, 'hotdog', 'not a team player', and 'The only reason this officer has not been buried in Article 15 proceedings is that the majority of offenses are being referred to courts martial.' would appear.

A fate that Clancy largely avoided, until hitting Red Rabbit and falling off a cliff. Larry Bond is also good, but has the benefit of stopping writing earlier than the others, leaving out the later books that simply recycled plot.

Personally, I prefer the stories surrounding a chap named Parmenio. Better research, better technothriller weaponry, and generally more entertaining writing.

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PostPosted: Tue May 16, 2017 8:08 pm 
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I started reading it last night. So far we have at least two near mustache twirling villains, and one reporter who I'm not is dead meat walking or someone about to change her entire belief system.

The good news Jan Field-Dixon has made her first appearance. Also long is Nathan Dixon, who I take it is Scott Dixon's Ranger son.

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PostPosted: Sat May 20, 2017 2:39 pm 
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KDahm wrote:
A fate that Clancy largely avoided, until hitting Red Rabbit and falling off a cliff.


While Red Rabbit isn't his best by any stretch, I didn't mind it since while the plot did seriously remind me of Cardinal, it was different and with enough of a distance in time that it was engaging enough to read. I tried getting into what he wrote later, but those came at a time when I was getting really sick of the "Muslim terrorists threaten the West" plot. I get why that was the hot thing at the time, but is a bit of diversity in plots too much to ask?

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