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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:10 am 
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The upcoming Tom Hanks (an actor I really like) and Meryl Streep (a rabid, lieing, America hating, Globalist, progressive, talentless WAYYY over the hill b1tch I really don't like) movie The Post has an absolutely brilliant Publicity Campaign aimed at all those who hate POTUS Trump, especially his brilliant FAKE NEWS campaign against the The Media, especially The Washington Post and New York Times.

My opinion of today's Washington Post is that it is, where Trump and his administration is concerned, primarily a purveyor of FAKE NEWS along the lines of MSNBC and CNN. It's readership, what little is left of it, is composed of progressives who absolutely detest POTUS Trump and WE deplorables who voted him into office. The post has a long history as the publicity ministry of the democrat party and a tool of the Deep state.

However there was a time when, despite it's liberal agenda, it did commit "JOURNALISM"( as in telling the truth) and that was under Katharine Graham and Ben Bradley for a short while. I'm talking about their coverage of the Pentagon Papers which, IMO, dealt fairly with both democrat and GOP administrations during the Nam war. Niether Party comes off well and IMO, they don't deserve to. You know what I think about the ethics of feeding kids into a meat grinder they KNEW we would NEVER be allowed to win. Just dragging it out as the butcher bill grew ever higher because they feared what MIGHT happen with the Soviets and Chi Cooms, as if both commie regimes were not giving massive aid and protection to the N. Viets. Furhtermore, anyone with any real knowledge of the Cold war KNEW The Cuban missile crisis had scared the ever loving Crap out of both the US and more importantly the Kremlin leadership. The Polet Bureau had learned it's lesson. Nuclear war with the US was much too high a price for any client state. MAD was well understood by both sides and so we had a stand off but both could screw around the periphery with proxy wars of national Liberation.

The following article is from the Guardian. Some of our Brit friends have a negative opinion of the Guardian. I don't know enough about Brit politics and certainly have read very few Guardian articles to know if they are right or wrong.

That said, a few paragraphs in this article caught my attention and they seems to make a lot of sense to me.


In ‘fake news’ era, reporters are back on screen as bringers of justice in The Post
Spielberg’s new film, telling the story of a female newspaper boss battling political corruption, gives the media a heroic face again in the age of Trump by Vanessa Thorpe 30 Dec ‘17

Meryl Streep steps nimbly between two worlds in Steven Spielberg’s tense new film The Post, set in the Washington of the 1970s. Dressed in a businesslike twinset, she must handle a male-dominated newspaper boardroom, then by night become the consummate society hostess, marshalling guests and domestic staff around her elegant home in a couture kaftan.

Streep plays Katharine “Kay” Graham, the rich, real-life widow who was handed control of the Washington Post after the death of her publisher father and the suicide of her husband.

Spielberg’s film, out in Britain on 19 January, shows Graham finding her feet in the treacherous world of political journalism, but is also a stirring anthem for press freedom. Graham’s decision to print extracts from the top secret Pentagon Papers about Vietnam, leaked by defence analyst Daniel Ellsberg in 1971, initially put the financial future of the Post in jeopardy, yet marked a turning point in attitudes to government. “We are not a little local paper any more,” declares gleeful editor Ben Bradlee, played by Tom Hanks, once the presses finally roll.

Although its rival, the New York Times had, in truth, broken the story, the Post weighed in quickly, at some risk, and was later to lead the pack with its coverage of Watergate, courtesy of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.

While Streep’s character is at the centre of the plot, much of the drama takes place in the newsroom. So The Post is soon to join a fine tradition of compelling newspaper films: a line of cinematic hits setting out either to celebrate the reporter’s honourable role in a democracy, or revel in the dirty tricks of the trade. And sometimes to do both. Much like the police, reporters are widely distrusted in the real world, but they do make handy screen protagonists. The Hollywood ideal has to be the cynical reporter played by Clark Gable, on the trail of his celebrity story in Frank Capra’s charming It Happened One Night (1934). Serious romantic competition could come only from Gregory Peck’s reporter in pursuit of his truanting princess in Roman Holiday (1953).

But a newspaperman’s hunt for a story has also given shape to plenty of murky thrillers, whether based on fact, like The Post and, most notably, All the President’s Men (1976), or based on nothing more than imaginative neurosis, like the acclaimed British outing, Defence of the Realm. This dark 1986 film, which starred Gabriel Byrne as an investigative reporter, compared well with All the President’s Men for the leading American critic Roger Ebert, but was “a bleaker, more pessimistic movie”.
Kirk Douglas in Ace in the Hole.

Newspaper investigations recur as a neat frame for storytelling in cinema. Perhaps the most exalted example is the search for the meaning of Rosebud in Citizen Kane, but on a rather more camp register the job also allows the bespectacled Clark Kent of the Daily Planet to travel around America with his photographer sidekick in the Superman films.

The search for a big story helpfully takes a lead character into the heart of events in a way only otherwise credible for a private detective. So Hitchcock’s 1940 thriller Foreign Correspondent propelled hardboiled American crime reporter Joel McCrea off to Europe in search of spies, while in 1984 the Bafta-winning The Killing Fields sent Sam Waterston off to file from Cambodia only shortly after The Year of Living Dangerously had seen Mel Gibson posted out to Indonesia by director Peter Weir, in what remains a critics’ favourite in the crumpled-linen-suit school of screen reporting. Spielberg clearly has a particular feeling for the embedded journalist working on the frontline. The scene showing the typewriter Ellsberg carries with him “in country” at the opening of The Post harks back to scenes in his own earlier blockbuster, Saving Private Ryan.

. . .

It might seem an odd moment to celebrate the press. For although reporters have always existed on the edge of social acceptability, they are now especially demonised, both from the left and the right. Nevertheless, Streep and her co-star Hanks both agreed to make The Post for Spielberg as a swift response to the political atmosphere at the White House, where oppositional newspapers are again being offered limited access.

In America, the film’s contribution has been warmly welcomed by critics and newspaper executives. The review in Variety typically hailed it as “a movie of galvanising relevance” and predicted Oscar honours, while Len Downie, a former executive editor at the Washington Post, has judged: “This movie means a lot at this time in history.”

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 9:28 am 
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This explains a lot of why The Post publicity campaign is so effective. I know The Post is about the Pentagon Papers and the title of this article includes WATERGATE. Just read the article and you will see why I believe it is relevant to this thread.

Why liberals are so pathetically fixated on Watergate
by Kyle smith

From glancing at the headlines (or even at entertainment news), you could be forgiven for thinking a full-blown Watergate is upon us.

“Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg find parallels to Nixon era,” ran a Dec. 15 headline in The Washington Post. Spielberg has said he made the movie “The Post” because the dawn of the Trump era was exactly the right time for an unabashed prequel to “All the President’s Men” that ends with the Watergate burglary. Hanks added that if President Trump invited him to screen the movie at the White House, he’d decline and be more likely to lead an anti-Trump revolution. “We have to decide when we take to the ramparts,” Hanks said, promoting his new 1971-set film about The WaPo’s and The New York Times’ decision to print classified deliberations about the Vietnam War.

Back then, “The Nixon administration tried to stop the story from being published,” Hanks said. “They took on the First Amendment by saying: ‘You can’t tell that story, and if you do, we’re going to threaten you.’ That is going on, of course, right now.”

Actually, the Nixon administration didn’t just “threaten” the media but via its Justice Department secured an injunction to forbid The Times from publishing the Pentagon Papers. This is not “going on, of course, right now.” What is going on is that, like the flabby 59-year-old who can’t stop telling you how he scored the winning touchdown in high school, liberals can’t stop reliving the Watergate era. To them, Watergate stands for the twin milestones, never approached since, of taking out a Republican president and making heroes out of liberal reporters.

Today, after a year of breathless coverage of what still looks like an evidence-free Beltway urban legend about supposed criminal collusion between Donald Trump and the Russians to sway the 2016 election, there is still no reason to think the president is going to be impeached anytime soon. And last month a devastating Quinnipiac poll showed 58 percent of voters disapprove of the way the media covers Trump, 39 percent believe the media simply makes up stories about the president and only 54 percent trust the media more than Trump to tell the truth.

“Oh, well!” say lefty activists and their allies in journalism and the arts. Let’s just make believe.

“The Post” is one of several Watergate-inspired works Hollywood is pumping out to troll the Trump administration. HBO’s documentary “Newspaperman: The Life and Times of Ben Bradlee,” debuted this month, while George Clooney just announced he is developing and executive-producing an eight-hour Watergate miniseries for Netflix.

Meanwhile, the headlines keep on coming. “Donald Trump is a one-man Watergate,” ran a story in the Chicago Reader. (This, back in March). “Worse than Watergate: Trump’s Constitutional Crisis,” screamed a Huffington Post headline in May. “Trump is in much deeper trouble today than Nixon was in September 1972,” ran an October headline in Slate. “This is moving sooooo much faster than Watergate investigation did,” tweeted MSNBC host Lawrence O’Donnell on Dec. 1. Trump is at a “Watergate moment,” Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal said on MSNBC the same day. John Dean, the former Nixon White House counsel who helped bring down the administration, waited until only four months into Trump’s tenure before making the rounds to tell anyone who would listen (Samantha Bee, the LA Times, even a Tennessee boys’ school called Montgomery Bell Academy) that Trump was worse.

For the Trumpsistance, “The Post” is not just an absorbing newspaper procedural but more like another “Lord of the Rings” outing upon which they imagine themselves slaying orcs with Frodo and Aragorn. Don’t be surprised to see them lining up to watch “The Post” in their cosplay finest — pussy-bow blouses for the Katharine Graham fangirls, 4-inch-wide ties for the Ben Bradlee wannabes. Except Ian McKellen never encouraged his fans to think he shared their delusions about actually venturing into Mordor to do battle with supreme evil.

Hanks is, of course, free to prove me wrong by “taking to the ramparts,” ordinarily understood to mean participating in an armed insurrection against tyranny, not just giving speeches on awards shows and interviews to Stephen Colbert. (Which is the kind of stuff Hanks does even when he doesn’t think the republic is in danger.)

The truth that Spielberg, Hanks, co-star Meryl Streep and the rest of the enraged left can’t quite admit (because it would damage their chances of winning awards) is that Trump’s incessant Twitter attacks on the media may be unprecedented (and counterproductive, and childish) but they don’t actually endanger the Constitution and they aren’t impeachable offenses. There’s nothing in the First Amendment that says, “The president shall tweet no tweet abridging the freedom of the press by typing “FAKE NEWS!!!” at duly accredited journalists or even Wolf Blitzer.”

Trump may share President Nixon’s habit of losing his temper, but if being tantrum-prone were a disqualification from high office we’d have needed a congressional committee to investigate that lamp Hillary Clinton reportedly threw at Bill during the Monica Lewinsky crisis.

Kyle Smith is critic-at-large at National Review.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 4:08 pm 
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OSCSSW wrote:
...and Meryl Streep (a rabid, lieing, America hating, Globalist, progressive, talentless WAYYY over the hill b1tch I really don't like)


How do you think about Susan Sarandon?

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trekchu wrote:
It was worse than he had expected. It was so incomprehensibly bad that he'd rather watch Pearl Harbor on a constant, never-ending loop than...


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