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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
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The Joke’s on you, Part 1
Date: December 29th, 1941
Location: the waters of the western Pacific, 75 nautical miles from Hashirajima
Time: 5:00 PM local time

After apparently-uneventful voyage back across the Pacific, the Kido Butai task force is nearing its home port. Aside from the six carriers, the destroyers and the fleet oilers, the two battleships Hiei & Kirshima, the two cruisers Tone & Chikuma and four destroyers (Urakaze, Isokaze, Tanikaze and Hamakaze) had been detached to aid in operations against Wake Island back on December 16th when the task force passed through those waters.

The Japanese task force is just 75 nautical miles from home; already, the crews aboard the carriers, destroyers and other ships are dreaming of shore leave and perhaps, visits to their families after the disaster that was Pearl Harbor. Originally, the fleet was supposed to ahve arrived back on december 23rd but, due to extremely adverse winds and heavy seas, its passage was delayed. Aside from the eight fighters from each carrier that provided barrier combat air patrol (BARCAP) over their home decks while the other aircraft were away, the only survivors of the 414-strong air armada that carried out the attack are 62 fighters, dive bombers and level bombers. Of these, quite a few were damaged by enemy anti-aircraft fire or by fire from enemy aircraft during the raid. During the voyage home, each of the damaged aircraft was seen to by its support crew in order to repair such damage as was possible.

All this is about to change. Ever since December 7th, Kido Butai has been shadowed by Mr. Smith’s submarine ‘Nautilus’. Captain Jay Fletcher has been careful never to come closer to the Japanese ships than 20,000 yards, while always mirroring the enemy’s exact course and speed. This way, if the Japanese were able to get any kind of sonar return, they would think that it’s a false echo; this mistake is going to end up costing them dearly.

At 5:00 PM on the afternoon of December 29th, Captain Fletcher is on the Nautilus’ bridge when he says “sonar, Conn; report all contacts”. The reply comes less than 30 seconds later “Conn, sonar; the enemy fleet is Bearing Red213.75°; speed is 18 knots and range is 20,000 yards. They are maintaining their present course.”

“Sonar, conn; very good. Stand by.” Captain Fletcher now says “XO, how about we spoil the Japanese fleet’s homecoming?”

“Sounds good to me, sir. Even though Mr. Smith wanted it this way, this watching and waiting was getting to be rather monotonous.”

“Indeed.”

At last, the moment has arrived that everyone aboard the Nautilus has been waiting for. Captain Fletcher picks up his microphone and says “attention all hands; this is the Captain speaking; man battle stations torpedo. XO, set condition 1SQ for torpedo launch. Weps?”

“Aye, Captain?”

“Get the fish ready to swim; download the relevant targeting information on the six Japanese carriers from the ship’s database into the fire control computer and augment it with their range, bearing, course and speed. Report when ready.”

“Aye aye, sir.”

Five minutes later, the ship’s fire control computer has all of the necessary information ready to download into the guidance computer of each torpedo. The weapons officer gives the necessary commands and several seconds later, each weapon is ready to fire. The next orders given are “flood all tubes, open outer doors; firing order is forward tubes 1-6 in sequence.”

“Aye, sir; my boards show all tubes ready.”

“Very well, match generated bearings and.....SHOOT!!”

“Fire One...Fire Two...Fire Three...Fire Four...Fire Five...Fire Six.”

As the trigger is pulled, each supercavitating torpedo is ejected from its tube by a charge of compressed air at intervals of 15 seconds apart. Each weapon travels out to a distance of 50 yards before igniting its rocket motor and accelerating to 200 knots; at this speed, it will take each of them just three minutes to reach their target. Blissfully unawares up to this moment, the six carriers are travelling in line ahead, with the carrier Akagi being last in line. Suddenly a warning is received from one of the escorting destroyers “TORPEDOES IN THE WATER, BEARING GREEN090, RANGE 20,000 YARDS AND CLOSING.”

The warning is instantly communicated to all ships in the fleet; the carriers increase their speed to flank and begin to maneuver so as to make it as difficult as possible for them to be targeted, while the escorting destroyers move to keep themselves between the six carriers and what their captains think is a submarine from the U.S Navy. Hardly have all ships concerned begun to move when the Akagi is struck from underneath between the #3 and #4 shafts; the exact impact site is directly between the skegs, and was carefully chosen. When the torpedo hits, the warhead’s detonation (equal to three tons of TNT) causes the seals on the skegs to be blown and the #3 and #4 propellor shafts to be warped. The damaged seals cause water to start flooding into Akagi’s port engine rooms, to the consternation of the ship’s command & engineering crews. Immediately, those two shafts are disengaged so that they cease turning and further damaging themselves. On the Kaga, Soryu, Hiryu, Shokaku and Zuikaku, this scene is repeated at intervals of 15-20 seconds each.

The fleet is commanded by Admiral Chuichi Nagumo, who flies his flag aboard the carrier Shokaku. His officers are struggling mightily to determine where the attack came from and to formulate a proper defense. The damage to each carrier’s prpellor shafts is such that each vessel is obliged to cut its speed in half. For example, where Shokaku could travel at a top speed of 34 knots, the ship is now forced to go no more than 17 knots.

Back aboard the Nautilus, Captain Fletcher says “Good job, XO, Weps; my compliments to your people. Now, I think it’s time to exit the area; if I know anything about Admiral Nagumo and his skippers, they’re boiling for a fight right about now. Helm, come hard about; set course for Niihau Station and increase speed to flank.” The helmsman replies “come hard about, set course for Niihau Station, increase my speed to flank. aye, sir.”

Nautilus’ forward speed increases to 50 knots and very soon, she leaves the pursuing Japanese destroyers in her wake. Back aboard Shokaku, Admiral Nagumo orders his communications officer to send word to the headquarters of the Naval General Staff about what just happened. Next, the fleet’s remaining destroyers (except for two detailed as an advance guard) are ordered to form a protective screen on the flanks and to the rear.

In the meantime, message traffic between Kido Butai and Japanese Naval Headquarters is intercepted by Commander Joseph Rochefort and his band of merry men back in Hawaii at Station Hypo. The volume of the traffic is such that Cmdr Rochefort infers that something drastic must have happened. Immediately, he sets Lt. Joseph Finnegan and his staff to work on decrypting it. Their task is greatly aided by the use of SmithCorp ‘Skynet’ codebreaking computers. Within the hour, the messages are read and Rochefort is the first to grasp just what they mean. Immediately, he composes a message to the Navy Department outlining what happened and assigns it top priority for transmission.

The Joke’s on you, Part 2
Date: January 2nd, 1942
Location: Wake Island
Time: late afternoon

After Admiral Kajioka’s second landing attempt was thrown back with heavy losses, he immediately sent a message to the headquarters of the Naval General Staff in Tokyo requesting further instructions. The reply is as immediate as it is short and to the point; Wake Island must be taken. To this end, the Admiral calls a meeting of his senior staff and says “gentlemen, I have just heard back from our higher headquarters. Admiral Yamamoto himself said that Wake must fall and that all other considerations are of secondary importance. This being said, I believe that any further attempts to put troops ashore will be futile unless the capacity of those damnable Americans to resist us is eliminated. Therefore, we will proceed by forming all of our ships into a gun line and pounding the island until no brick or stone stands upon another.”

One of Admiral Kajioka’s staff officers stands up and says “sir, presently our remaining ships consist of the battleship Kirishima, the cruiser Chikuma, the light cruiser Tatsuta and six destroyers; Urakaze, Isokaze, Tanikaze, Hamakaze, Kisaragi & Hayate. This will give us a total of eight 14" guns, eight 8" guns, eight 5" guns and nineteen 4.7" guns. The biggest guns that the Americans have on the island are 6", and there are only six of them. For additional support, we can call on airbases in the Marshall Islands.”

“Very good, commander. My plan is to group Kirishima, Chikuma and Tatsuta together and blast the island flat. The other ships will be kept out of range until we can be sure that those American 6" guns have been destroyed. Afterwards, the destroyers will close in and finish off the job. We begin in three days.”

“Aye, sir.”

The meeting concludes and orders are immediately issued to Admiral Kajioka’s ships. The fleet withdraws to a distance of eleven miles and takes up position; Kirishima, Chikuma and Tatsuta in front, with the six destroyers a further three miles to the rear.

Date: January 2nd, 1942
Time: late evening

Having received permission from the Navy department to prepare his command for evacuation, Commander Cunningham calls a staff meeting and says “gentlemen, our position on Wake Island is now untenable; further resistance on our part would only serve to get us all killed. Therefore, we are going to evacuate. Major Putnam, Captain Elrod, you’ll prepare your remaining P-38 fighters by adding a pair of 150-gallon drop tanks to the inboard hardpoints on each wing. This will give your aircraft the range to reach Pearl Harbor with about 200 miles to spare. Lieutenant Kennedy, you’ll prepare your six PT boats by removing the torpedoes & racks, then using the extra weight capacity to carry more fuel.”

“Yes, sir. Dumping the torpedoes and rack will free up approximately five tons of weight. This translates to an extra 1,375 gallons of fuel, carried in 55-gallon drums lashed to the deck. My concern is that, even with the extra fuel, we won’t be able to reach Oahu.”

At this, Rick Leavitt speaks up and says “Lieutenant Kennedy, my employer Mr. Smith is already prepared for this situation. Even as we speak, ships are on their way here to evacuate everyone on Wake who isn’t one of Major Putnam’s pilots or Lieutenant’s Kenendy’s sailors. Additionally, other ships will be stationed along the route to provide refueling capacity for the PT boats.” Commander Cunningham considers this for a moment, then replies “be that as it may, the Japanese are hardly likely to let that ship just waltz in here and pick us all up...”

A predatory grin crosses Mr. Leavitt’s face as he replies “Commander, you may take it from me with absolute certainty that Japanese opposition won’t be a problem.”

“Very well, Mr. Leavitt. I’m trusting you with the lives of the officers and men under my command. Until it is time to leave, what will you and your men be doing?”

“We’ll be preparing a little surprise package for when the Japanese eventually come on shore; it’s located in the holds of the supposedly-wrecked cargo ship out in the lagoon. In fact, the ship was made to appear is it had been sunk as a result of damage sustained in the recent actions against the Japanese. This was done so as not to attract further enemy fire...”

“Why is that? What’s so special about that ship that it had to appear as if it were wrecked?”

“Commander Cunningham, that ship belongs to my employer and it is carrying a very large cargo of high explosives. It will be set to go off shortly after the Japanese come ashore; call it a kind of practical joke.”

“Just how much explosives are aboard that ship?”

Leavitt grins once again as he replies “ohh, how does ten thousand tons of Torpex sound?”

Cunnigham and his officers are so surprised by this statement that it is some time before they can respond. Eventually, Commander Cunningham says “did you just say ten thousand TONS of explosives?”

“Yes sir, I most certainly did. I think it’s rather obvious that we don’t want to be anywhere within ten miles of this place when Mr. Smith’s little party favor goes off; there won’t be much of an island left after that.” For the next few minutes, excited (and sometimes angry) discussions run around the conference table. Eventually, Cunningham pounds on the table and says “alright, people; pipe down and let’s get to work.”

For the next two days, Wake Island’s entire garrison throws themselves into their work. The fighters and PT boats are prepared for evacuation, while everyone else does whatever is necessary to facilitate the escape. Finally on the night of January 4th, everything is in readiness.

Surprise, Surprise, Surprise
Date: January 4th, 1942
Location: Wake Island
Time: 8:00 PM local time

After two days of frenzied preparation, everything on Wake is ready to go. Drop tanks have been fitted to the P-38s, while the PT boats have removed their torpedoes & torpedo racks and replaced them with 55-gallon drums of fuel. Along with their personal weapons, the Marines and the aircraft ground crews will be taking one small bag of clothing and personal necessities.

In the meantime, the officers and men aboard Admiral Kajioka’s ships are eagerly anticipating the action to come tomorrow morning. Just then, the destroyers on picket duty flash a warning “ENEMY SHIPS APPROACHING FROM THE EAST-NORTHEAST; RANGE FIFTY NAUTICAL MILES AND CLOSING.” Immediately, General Quarters is sounded all throughout the fleet and the crews immediately run to their battle stations.

What seems to be an attack by American warships is nothing of the sort; what’s actually happening is that one of Mr. Smith’s Ghost Eagle-V UCAVs is on station and spoofing the radar systems on the Japanese ships. Instead of a patch of empty ocean, what appears on the enemy’s radar screens are a number of surface contacts approaching at the speed of 25 knots. Admiral Kajioka orders his ships to deploy in battle formation to resist the oncoming attack; the helmsmen alter their courses and the ships begin to move.

Back on Wake Island, Mr. Leavitt comes to Commander Cunningham and says “sir, Mr. Smith’s ships will be here in a little less than one hour. Would you please alert your men to be ready to move out?” Cunningham replies “how are we going to get everyone aboard? There aren’t sufficient small craft to get the men off the island in the time available...”

“Don’t worry about that one, sir. The two ships have a number of small boats aboard that will be launched to provide that transportation.”

Time: 9:15 PM local time

Whiel Admiral Kajioka’s ships are off chasing ghosts, Mr. Smith’s two ships arrive to evacuate Wake Island’s defenders. SS Glomar Explorer and SS Arcadia drop anchor just one mile offshore; their captains give the order to lower away their small boats and soon, the evacuation is under way. Back ashore on Wake Island, Major Putnam and Captain Elrod take their six remaining P-38s aloft and head towards Oahu, while Lieutenant Kennedy and his PT boat crews do likewise with their ships.

In preparation for the evacuation. Wake’s stores of munitions, the vehicles and artillery have all been readied for demolition by using charges made from the civilian dynamite stockpile on the island (previously used for construction purposes. At 9:30 PM, the first boats come into the lagoon and begin to take the Marines and other personnel aboard. These are quickly shuttled out to the waiting ships and the boats return to pick up more men. By 11:30 PM, all of the men on Wake Island are safely aboard ship.

In the meantime, the Japanese fleet is approaching the location where the enemy ships were sighted by radar. Suddenly, the images disappear from off their radar screens, much to the consternation of the officers and bridge crews. An hour of searching by his ships leads Admiral Kajioka to conclude that the earlier radar returns must have been mistaken, so he orders his ships to reverse course and head back to Wake Island. In order to keep the Americans from possibly taking advantage of this situation and trying to escape, the admiral orders that his six destroyers take up station around Wake Island at the range of seven or eight miles

SS Glomar Explorer is the senior of Mr. Smith’s two ships involved in this phase of the operation, so Commander Cunningham, Major Deveraux and their staff come aboard to meet with her commanding officer. The men are piped aboard and the meeting takes place in the ship’s wardroom.

“Good evening, Gentlemen. I am Captain Edward Roberts, commanding officer of SS Glomar Explorer; welcome aboard. My crew will see to quarters and provisions for you and you men; for now, I’m sure that you’ve got more than a few questions.”

Commander Cunningham speaks first and says “Captain Roberts, just how did this ship get past the Japanese? If they weren’t wilfully blind, the Japanese would have seen you and the other ship coming from miles away...” Captain Roberts grins widely and says “Commander, all it took was a little misdirection. You see, the Japanese fleet was fooled into thinking that there were a number of ships approaching from the east-northeast; all that we did was to take advantage of their absence. By now, I think the deception has been noticed.”

Captain Roberts uses a microphone mounted on a nearby bulkhead to call the bridge and say “XO, this is the Captain speaking. Lay in a course for the first rendezvous point, all ahead full.”

Jack Rackham immediately acknowledges the order and replies “lay in a course for Oahu, all ahead full, Aye, sir.”

Time: 11:30 PM local time

By now, SS Glomar Explorer and SS Arcadia have been under way for just over two hours. They are some 45 nautical miles away from Wake Island, and all of the Marines and sailors aboard them are celebrating their good fortune in having been able to escape. Back at Wake, the Japanese fleet has arrived and is preparing for the assault to come tomorrow morning; the destroyers are on picket duty around the island, and Admiral Kajioka is satisfied that there’s no way the Americans will slip out of his grasp.

Just then, a series of titanic explosions rocks the island. The demolition charges set among the garrison’s stockpiles of ammunition, rations, vehicles and equipment have gone off, while separate incendiary charges were set to burn down Wake’s barracks space. The bridge crews aboard the six destroyers can’t help but notice what’s going on, so messages are immediately flashed to Admiral Kajioka’s flagship. He confers with his personal staff and says “gentlemen, I think those explosions mean that the Americans realize that their situation is hopeless and that they are denying us the use of the weapons, munitions, equipment and supplies that we would otherwise have captured. Nevertheless, the operation commences after dawn tomorrow.”

The Killing Joke
Date: January 5th, 1942
Location: Wake Island
Time: 7:00 AM local time

All throughout the Japanese fleet, sailors man their duty stations in anticipation of the attack to come. By 7:00 AM, everything is in readiness. Admiral Kajioka orders “to all ships: OPEN FIRE!!” As the fleet’s flagship, Kirishima has the privilege of leveling her main battery and opening fire first. The ship is positioned parallel to Wake Island so that all eight of her 14" guns can bear on the target; very soon thereafter, all four turrets begin firing. The 14" guns are blasting away at their nominal rate of fire; 2 rounds per barrel per minute. Over the first five minutes, a total of 80 rounds are fired.

Kirishima is quickly joined by Chikuma and Tatsuta. Chikuma’s guns are firing at high elevation, so her rate of fire is limited to three rounds per minute; Tatsuta’s guns are firing at their maximum rate of 6 rounds per minute. In total, the first firing period of 15 minutes saw a total of 240 14" shells, 360 8" shells and 360 5.5" shells come raining down all over the island. A few shells of varying sizes even land in the lagoon, but they come nowhere near the ‘shipwreck’ lying there.

To assess the damage, Kirishima launches a seaplane from of her stern catapaults. The pilot overflies Wake Island and reports that the devastation seems to be total. The aircraft returns to the Kirishima, and the pilot delivers his report. Satisfied with what he hears, but desirous of teaching the upstart Americans a lesson in Japanese firepower, Admiral Kajioka orders his ships to start firing again. Just as before, the shooting lasts for 15 minutes. By now Kirishima has expended two-thirds of her basic load of 720 14" shells, while Chikuma and Tatsuta have each fired 25% of their stocks of main battery ammunition.

Seeing no response from Wake island’s defenders, Admiral Kajioka orders that Kirishima, Chikuma and Tatsuta cease fire in order to conserve their remaining main gun ammunition. The six destroyers are now ordered to close to within just three miles of the island and finish the job; one hour later, it’s all over. Another flight by one of Kirishima’s seaplanes reveals a scene of utter devastation, with the surface of Wake Island blasted into a virtual moonscape of smoking craters of varying sizes.

Admiral Kajioka’s face is crossed with a grin of satisfaction as he orders his captains to begin landing operations immediately. Both of Kirishima’s two seaplanes are put aloft to serve as airborne reconnaissance platforms, and are joined by all six aircraft from Chikuma. Secondary roles will be to strafe the island if necessary and to engage in light bombing where called for.

Back aboard ship, the remaining troops from the Special Naval Landing Force are joined by the remaining Japanese marines. The men are put aboard small craft and cautiously make their way towards the beach. Expecting to come under fire from the Americans, the Japanese troops are surprised when nothing of the sort happens.

The first order of business is to conduct an armed reconnaissance of the island. Once the landing beach is secure, platoon-sized elements of Japanese marines and the Naval landing force spread out all over the island. Within three hours, the reports start to come back and they are all the same. Scenes of utter devastation are everywhere, with burning debris, wrecked vehicles, smashed artillery pieces and shell craters both great and small. No buildings are intact and neither are the prepared positions from which artillery fired during the initial phases of the attack.

Admiral Kajioka concludes that the Americans must have evacuated Wake Island when his fleet was distracted. Therefore, he orders that the occupation begin in earnest. Additional small craft are launched form the six destroyers anchored just off shore, Then additional boats start to deliver supplies and equipment. While this is going on, Kirishima, Chikuma and Tatsuta don’t come as close as the destroyers; they anchor three miles off shore.

High overhead, the situation is being monitored closely by the sensor systems aboard a Ghost Eagle-V UCAV. Every 15 minutes, the operators back in Traffic Control at the Alpha Site are making regular reports to Otis Needleman who, in turn, forwards them to Mr. Smith. It is eventually noted that there are now hundreds of Japanese troops ashore on Wake Island, and that six Japanese destroyers are anchored about one mile offshore.

Needleman sends a priority transmission to Mr. Smith and says “boss, the bad guys are ashore in force on Wake Island. I think that it’s about time that your party favor was set off.” Mr. Smith replies “What’s the present situation?”
“There are 1,000 troops on shore, and more are arriving every hour. Ix Japanese destroyers are anchored off shore at the distance of one mile, while the Kirishima, Chikuma and Tatsuta are further out, perhaps at the distance of three miles or so.”

“You don’t say. Well, the Japanese must be rather surprised that they didn’t find anyone waiting to greet them when they came ashore. I see no reason why they all shouldn’t be given an opportunity to die for the Emperor, so you may fire when ready, Gridley.”

A predatory look crosses Otis Needleman’s face as he replies “copy that, boss.” To the UCAV operators he says “weapons hot, you may initiate at your discretion.”

While one operator controls the flight of the UCAV, the second operator inserts his arming key into the control panel and disengages the safety lock. Next, he begins a short countdown: “five, four, three, two, one....FIRE!!” The firing button is pressed, which relays a signal through the Ghost Eagle’s communications array. The signal reaches the detonators aboard the ‘wrecked’ ship in Wake Island’s lagoon and, instantly, the entire payload of 10,000 tons of Torpex goes off in an absolutely-volcanic blast. As such things are measured, this will be the largest conventional explosion that will ever take place. Everything and everyone on Wake Island is instantly annihilated by the force of the blast. The physics of the event are that Torpex has a detonation velocity of just under 29,000 feet-per-second, and that blast overpressure at Ground Zero is 7,580 PSI; falling to 15 PSI at a distance of ½ mile. At one mile, the overpressure is 7 PSI and at three miles, 1.75 PSI.

The ship carrying the Torpex was sunk in the lagoon, immediately south of the Pan American Airways seaplane terminal on Peale Island. When the explosives detonate, a crater measuring 300 yards across and 100 yards deep is excavated; since the ship is right next to the shore, the former site of the PAA hotel is obliterated (along with part of Flipper Point and the nearby shore); the effect is as if some incomprehensibly-vast creature took a huge bite out of the island.

Within the merest fraction of a second, the balst wave reaches the six Japanese destroyers anchored just offshore. They are sunk with all hands by the force of the blast and the accompanying blizzard of cast-iron shrapnel (in the form of more than 800,000 4.5"-diameter spheres). Another fraction of a second after that, the blast wave reaches the three Japanese capital ships. Of these, Kirishima’s upper works are smashed beyond recognition, while Chikuma and Tatsuta are similarly-damaged. Beyond these three, the fleet’s supply ships and oilers are damaged to a lesser (but still significant) degree. Deck fires break out on just about all of them, and it is only by the efforts of their crews that the fires didn’t go out of control.

Time: 11:00 AM

Lt. Kennedy’s PT boats are now 420 nautical miles west of Wake Island, with SS Glomar Explorer and SS Arcadia 120 nautical miles behind them. Suddenly, the personnel aboard all vessels hear a loud rumble from out of the west; the effect is as the roar of heavy guns. Immediately, Commander Cunningham seeks out Captain Roberts and asks “is that what I think it is?”

“You are correct, sir. Unless I am mistaken, sall the Japanese on Wake Island are now dead, and all of the ships nearby have either been sunk or heavily damaged. A rather ‘hot’ reception for some unwelcome guests, don’t you think?”

“I certainly do, Captain. Where do we go from here?”

“We’ll rendezvous with Lt. Kennedy’s PT boats in 13 hours. At that time, we’ll re-fuel them and proceed to the next rendezvous. It’s 2,300 miles from Wake Island to Oahu, so we’ll have to meet with them a total of three times.”

“What about Major Putnam, Captain Elrod and the other P-38 pilots?”

“Assuming a cruising speed of 350 mph, they landed at Pearl Harbor five hours ago. By now, they’re reporting to General Short; I rather imagine that they’ve got quite a story to tell....”

Operation: Vengeance
Date: January 8th, 1942
Location: various
Time: 1:00 PM Central European Time

Upon receiving intelligence that the Wannsee Conference is about to be held, Otis Needleman so apprises Mr. Smith and in turn, receives an order to dispatch a Ghost Eagle-V UCAV to Berlin and then to Paris. The machine eventually arrives on-station and begins to orbit the target location at an altitude of 50,000’AGL. The Ghost Eagle’s signature suppression systems and active stealth camouflage are such that the machine is for all intents & purposes invisible (both to the naked eye and the primitive radar systems in use by the Germans). For this mission, the weapons payload consists of two 750-lb FAE bombs (a copy of the old CBU-55), a 500-lb DIME (Dense Inert Metal Explosive) bomb and a standard 500-lb bomb.

Rather than a conventional casing of cast & machined steel the DIME bomb’s casing is spun from carbon fiber. The casing is in the form of a double-walled tube with tapered ends; the guidance unit is affixed to the tail, and there is a streamlined nosecone. With the walls of the cylinder is contained 150 lbs of an alloy of 91% tungsten, 5% nickel and 4” cobalt; this alloy is in the form of small pellets equivalent in size to #12 lead birdshot. The cylinder’s central cavity is filled with a charge of Torpex weighing 350 lbs; ordinarily, a 500-lb aerial bomb’s explosive charge would be no more than 50% of its nominal weight. On this basis of comparison, a 500-lb DIME bomb has 50% more explosive power than a conventional bomb of the same weight. Factoring in the increased power of Torpex, this weapon has almost as much explosive power as a conventional 1,000-lb bomb.

As for the thermobaric bomb, it consists of a streamlined aluminum cylinder with a round nose and guidance fins attached to the back. Inside the casing are three individual sub-munitions, each loaded with 150 lbs of propane and a small triggering charge. When the dispenser falls to a pre-determined height over the target, it will automatically rupture and deploy the submunitions. In turn, these submunitions will deploy themselves in such a manner that they descend on the target in a triangular pattern. At a predetermined height, the submunitions will deploy their payloads in clouds of highly-explosive gas measuring 90' in diameter and 8' thick. Then, the detonators fire the clouds and create massive explosions.

Far below the Ghost Eagle’s cruising altitude, the Wannsee Conference is getting under way. It is being hosted by SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich, and attended by a veritable ‘who’s who’ of high-ranking officials in the Nazi government. These individuals are SS-Gruppenführer Otto Hofmann, SS-Gruppenführer Heinrich Müller, SS-Oberführer Dr. Karl Eberhard Schöngarth, SS-Oberführer Dr. Gerhard Klopfer, SS-Obersturmbannführer Adolf Eichmann, SS-Sturmbannführer Dr. Rudolf Lange, Dr. Georg Leibbrandt, Dr. Alfred Meyer, Dr. Josef Bühler, Dr. Roland Freisler, SS-Brigadeführer Dr. Wilhelm Stuckart, SS-Oberführer Erich Neumann, Friedrich Wilhelm Kritzinger and Martin Luther.

Once all the participants have been assembled, Heydrich calls the meeting to order at 1:00 PM and says “gentlemen, we are met to discuss how to better implement the Führer’s policy of Endlösung; the ‘Final Solution’ to the Jewish Question and to this end, to foster better cooperation amongst the several departments of the Government of the Reich. Gruppenführer Hofmann, you are the head of the SS Race and Settlement Main Office; your department’s report, if you please...”

Hoffman opens his briefcase, assembles several documents and proceeds to take his position behind the lectern at the head of the table. He begins by saying “danke, Herr Obergruppenführer. I’ll begin by saying...”

Three minutes and thirty seconds before Hoffman began speaking, the Ghost Eagle-V circling the Wannsee Villa high overhead receives a signal from Operations to deploy its first weapon. Accordingly, the UCAV designates the target with its infarred targeting laser and deploys the 500-lb DIME bomb carried on the starboard wing. The weapon locks on to the laser light reflected from the target and falls true; it reaches terminal velocity in just three minutes, then strikes the target soon thereafter. The bomb comes in through the large window on the north end of the conference room at an angle and strikes near the middle of the conference table. Before any of those present can think to react, the weapon detonates. Instantly, a shock wave with a velocity of just under 29,000 feet-per-second is created; everyone in the room is instantly killed, from a combination of heat, pressure and getting pulped by the bomb’s microshrapnel. Thirty seconds after the DIME bomb detonates, the UCAV operators release the 750-lb thermobaric bomb. Taking the same time to fall, the weapon’s casing breaks open at a predetermined height and releases the three submunitions. They function as designed and the Wannsee Villa and four acres of the estate on which it sits is consumed in a massive explosion.

The senior UCAV operator turns to Otis Needleman and says “target destroyed, boss.” He replies “Good work. Proceed to the second target in Paris; you may engage and soon as the UCAV is on station.”

The Ghost Eagle assumes a new course and increases its speed to 350 mph; the distance between Berlin and Paris is 546 miles, so the flight takes less than one hour and 40 minutes. After arrival, the operators take care to locate the new target. This is the headquarters building (a structure formerly known as the
Banque Léopold Louis Dreyfus) of the General Commission to Jewish Affairs (CGQJ), located on the Place des Petits-Pères in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris. Given its former use, the building is stoutly-constructed. Therefore, the 500-lb demolition bomb will deployed first to blast open the roof. Then, the 750-lb FAE will be dropped. Given that the 2nd arrondissement of Paris is largely a business district, it was decided to wait until well after dark to conduct the strike (the better to avoid unnecessary casualties).

Time: 9:00 PM

The work day for Parisians has been done for the past three hours; everyone in the offices and businesses in the 2nd arrondissement of Paris has gone home for the night. There are still police officers and other functionaries on duty in the CGQJ headquarters and for them, this will be their last night on earth. As planned, the 500-lb demolition bomb is dropped. After it goes off, the 750-lb FAE is deployed. Just as at the Wannsee Villa in Berlin, the resulting explosion is of such magnitude that the CGQJ headquarters is leveled (along with the entirety of the Place des Petits-Pères). Instantly, the contents of the CGQJ building (including the files which would have been used to conduct the roundup of the Jewish citizens of Paris) begin to burn quite vigorously. Given the destruction in the
Place des Petits-Pères and the streets surrounding it, it is some little time before the Municipal Fire Department is able to get close enough to begin fighting the blaze; by this time, the blaze is almost out of control. Eventually however, the fires are put out. All that is left of the CGQJ building is a charred shell, with piles of smoking ash filling the basement and first floor. Otis Needleman notes the success of the second strike and immediately sends a message to Mr. Smith.

“Good evening, boss. I just wanted to let you know that the Wannsee Villa has been destroyed and everyone inside the building has been killed. Also, the General Commission to Jewish Affairs building in Paris has been destroyed. So much for those Nazi assholes and their boot-licking Vichy collaborators being able to carry out the Vel d’Hive roundup.”

“Mr. Smith claps his hands with great enthusiasm and replies “excellent work, Otis; my compliments to everyone involved. Now that those two targets have been serviced, send word to the French Section to execute Phase Two of Operation Vengeance.”

“Copy that, Jim. I’ll report back when all targets have been terminated with extreme predjudice. Needleman out.”

Date: January 9th-January 10th, 1942

In the immediate aftermath of the destruction of CGQJ headquarters, the French National Police and the Paris branch of the Gestapo are falling all over themselves as they struggle to determine exactly just what happened. All throughout Paris, there is an undercurrent of fear and uncertainty as officials in the Vichy Government wonder if the explosions and fire were the result of an enemy air raid. In this atmosphere, agents of Mr. Smith’s French Section go into action. Their targets are as follows:

René Bousquet; Secretary-General of the National Police
Jean Leguay; Bousquet’s deputy
Xavier Vallat; current head of the CGQJ
Louis Darquier de Pellepoix; Vallat’s successor as head of the CGQJ
André Tulard; creator of the CGJQ files, head of the Foreigners & Jewish Affairs Section, Prefecture of Police, Paris.
Jean Francois; Director of the General Police
Emile Hennequin; head of the Paris Police

Mr. Smith decided that the deaths of these seven men were entirley proper and necessary, as they would have been instrumental in carrying out the Vel d’Hive roundup. First, René Bousquet is kidnapped while on his way home from his office and taken to a safe house where his neck is broken with a device called a portable scaffold. This instrument consists of a brace for the shoulders, a collar that goes around the neck and a powerful pneumatic ratchet connecting the two. When activated, it fractures the vicitm’s neck between the 3rd and 5th cervical verterbrae in one-tenth of a second (thus exactly duplicating the effects of an execution conducted on a gallows). Afterwards, Bousquet’s body is dumped on the Place du Combat; near the former site of the Gibbert of Montfaucon (used by the Kings of France between 1278 and 1629 to execute criminals and display their bodies afterwards).

Next in line to be killed is Jean Lequay, who is stabbed to death with an icicle as he leaves his office. Lequay had a driver and two bodyguards with him, so the five men were gassed unconscious before Lequay was stabbed. At the same time that Jean Lequay’s death was being carried out, Xavier Vallat was kidnapped, gassed unconscious and taken to the same safehouse where René Bousquet was killed. Here, he was wrapped up in chicken wire along with two hundred pounds of cast-iron window weights. Afterwards, he was thrown from the Pont Neuf into the Seine to drown.

Number Four on the hit parade is Louis Darquier de Pellepoix. He is kidnapped from his home, fitted for a pair of concrete overshoes and thrown into the Seine while still conscious. André Tulard is asphyxiated to death at his home from an apparent natural gas leak, while Jean Francois killed at his home when an electric fan ‘accidentally’ falls into his tub and he is electrocuted. Last but not least, Emile Hennequin is killed via asphyxiation with carbon dioxide gas from dry ice.


Last edited by Garrity on Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 4:46 pm 
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Good endings to bad actors

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 5:00 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
Good endings to bad actors

Both the Japanese invaders at Wake Island and those Vichy French assclowns got precisely what they deserved.

I can only imagine how FDR is going to respond when he gets word of Mr. Smith's latest stunt....


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:32 pm 
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Garrity wrote:
jemhouston wrote:
Good endings to bad actors

Both the Japanese invaders at Wake Island and those Vichy French assclowns got precisely what they deserved.

I can only imagine how FDR is going to respond when he gets word of Mr. Smith's latest stunt....


Probably read him the riot act for the Guam bomb. If a Japanese shell hit it, good bye Guam and US defenders.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:55 am 
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jemhouston wrote:
Garrity wrote:
jemhouston wrote:
Good endings to bad actors

Both the Japanese invaders at Wake Island and those Vichy French assclowns got precisely what they deserved.

I can only imagine how FDR is going to respond when he gets word of Mr. Smith's latest stunt....


Probably read him the riot act for the Wake Island bomb. If a Japanese shell hit it, good bye Guam and US defenders.

Those are my thoughts, also. It was an incredible, calculated gamble which paid off VERY handsomely. In all likelihood, FDR will STRONGLY advise Mr. Smith not to pull anything like it again.


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At least not before checking with him.

FDR might let him get away with pulling one on the Army, but not the Navy. According General Marshall, FDR always referred to the Army as them, USN as us. :lol:

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Garrity wrote:
Those are my thoughts, also. It was an incredible, calculated gamble which paid off VERY handsomely. In all likelihood, FDR will STRONGLY advise Mr. Smith not to pull anything like it again.


"Well done Sir. Now, Don't EVER do that again . . . "

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Thu Sep 14, 2017 3:22 pm 
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I honestly thought that little stunt was going to extirpate the entire atoll; Imagine how surprised I was when I ran the numbers and all that happened was to take a little bite out of the so the shore of Beale Island. It would have needed over one hundred times as much bangstoff, and that's a wee bit beyond Mr. Smith's capabilities.

Unless of course he decides to go nuclear which would of course, lead to some rather pointed questions..... :shock:


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2017 10:07 pm 
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Nitpicks ahead.

1.
Quote:
The Ghost Eagle assumes a new course and increases its speed to 350 mph; the distance between Berlin and Paris is 546 miles, so the flight takes less than 40 minutes


Math doesn't gibe. Do you mean an hour rand 40 minutes?

2. You've got the wannsee meeting getting blasted at 1 PM, an hour and 40 minute flight, and then the paris building getting blasted at 9 PM. Unless you're using more than one, which kind of seems to be the opposite of what's implied, you've fiddled the times. Do you have the ghost eagle flying racetrack patterns for something like 7 hours?

On the plus side, I am enjoying this still. Keep up the good work.

Belushi td


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 2:38 pm 
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Belushi TD wrote:
Nitpicks ahead.

1.
Quote:
The Ghost Eagle assumes a new course and increases its speed to 350 mph; the distance between Berlin and Paris is 546 miles, so the flight takes less than 40 minutes


Math doesn't gibe. Do you mean an hour rand 40 minutes?

2. You've got the wannsee meeting getting blasted at 1 PM, an hour and 40 minute flight, and then the paris building getting blasted at 9 PM. Unless you're using more than one, which kind of seems to be the opposite of what's implied, you've fiddled the times. Do you have the ghost eagle flying racetrack patterns for something like 7 hours?

On the plus side, I am enjoying this still. Keep up the good work.

Belushi td

You're right, it should have been and hour and a half; will edit. As for the UCAV that did the Paris and Berlin strikes, it did fly a race track pattern.


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sat Sep 16, 2017 4:54 pm 
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Why have it increase speed? Increased speed means increased fuel burn...

Why not have it just go to Paris? Who cares if it takes longer, as it has to sit around evading detection for some 7 hours anyway, plenty of time to make the trip at 100 MPH.

Belushi TD


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