History, Politics And Current Affairs

Opinions expressed here are personal views of contributors and do not necessarily represent the companies, organizations or governments they work for. Nor do they necessarily represent those of the Board Administration.
It is currently Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:20 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 514 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 ... 26  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Fri Jul 07, 2017 9:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
Baker Easy wrote:
Nitpick; Konoe is still PM at this point. Tojo is Army Minister and won't be PM until mid-October, and probably as-yet mostly unknown to the American public. (Mr. Smith letting slip a comment about Tojo, though...)

I do tend to think that diplomacy could have achieved peace in the Pacific on terms acceptable to the US (not easily; it would demand knowledge of exactly which of Japan's buttons to push. Read [url-https://www.amazon.com/Japan-1941-Countdown-Eri-Hotta/dp/0307739740/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499435741&sr=8-1&keywords=Japan+1941]Japan 1941[/url] for the details) and that Mr. Smith has the pull (and the access to knowledge) to make it work. That said, I expect he prefers to see that the militarists in Japan get a damned good thrashing anyway.

To say that Mr. Smith is going to give the militarists in japan a good thrashing is a monumental understatement... 8-)

Not only are they the enemy, they're also the competition....

That bit about Tojo wasn't off the mark; the butterfly effect, and all that, you know...


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 12:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
Into the West
Date: September 5th, 1941
Location: various locations in Arizona
Time: various

Those locations visited on the Arizona leg of the grand tour include Mr. Smith’s properties in the Tombstone District, the Lost Dutchman mine, the uranium properties on the Arizona Strip and the Big Eye telescope in Flagstaff. After leaving Phoenix, Mr. Smith’s party drives northwest to the town of Wickenburg. Here, there is a brief side trip to visit operations at the Vulture gold mine outside of town. The mine’s management staff is glad to have a visitor of such stature, and they take great pains to explain their operations in detail. All the while, Mr. Smith is considering in his mind that he’ll be taking control of the mine after it closes in 1942.

The party leaves Wickenburg and drives northwest on U.S. Route 93 until they reach Black Canyon Dam, the last stop on the Arizona leg of the trip and the first stop in Nevada. Rather than taking the bridge over the Colorado River, Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the others come up to the dam from the Arizona side and park next to the Operations Center. General Manager Martin Samuels is on hand to greet them, and he says “welcome to Black Canyon, boss. I hope you had a good trip so far.”

“Indeed I have, Mr. Samuels; this is the first time I have been here since the dam was dedicated back in 1936. I have been wanting to come for a visit, but my duties elsewhere have prevented that until now.”

“I understand, sir. If you and your party will please follow me, we’ll get started with the tour.” The tour begins with a walk over the top of the dam to the Nevada side of the project; Mr. Samuels pauses and says “Mr. Smith, for the benefit of those in your party who aren’t familiar with the details of this project, I’ll begin by saying that Black Canyon Dam is of the concrete gravity-arch design. It measures 730' from base to crown, is 90' across at the top and 1,000' thick at the base. Rather than ordinary concrete, Mr. Smith ordered that only concrete made with pozzolana sand be used.”

Mr. Smith speaks up and says “Joanne, I made this decision because pozzolana is what the Romans used to make their concrete; not only will this kind of concrete set under water, it will last practically forever. Consider that, Roman monuments, bridges and roads built with concrete are still in good shape; 2,000 years after they were constructed. I don’t think it too much of a stretch to say that this dam will still be in good condition and operating 3,000 years from now.”

Mr. Samuels speaks up and says “exactly, sir.” He goes onto describe the project’s design; instead of a straight gravity dam, an arch was chosen because it is the strongest possible natural shape. As the arch of the dam points upstream, the force of the water from the reservoir behind it is directed through the dam and into the bedrock on either side of the canyon. Before the tour comes inside the dam, Mr. Samuels points out the star chart embedded in the terrazzo floor outside the entrance to the dam proper. This chart exactly replicates the night sky on the day that the dam was dedicated back in 1936, and will serve to indicate to people in the far future exactly when the dam was built. Next to the map and set into the rock of the canyon walls are a series of bronze panels done in bas relief. These panels describe various phases in the construction of the dam and were included to commemorate the immense amounts of effort put in by the construction crews. Thanks to Mr. Smith’s rigorous safety standards, not a single man died during the construction of the dam. During the entire span of the project, the construction crews were well-treated and well-paid. In fact, the original project supervisor Frank Crowe was fired by Mr. Smith because he and several of his managers tried to segregate the work crews against his specific orders not to do so. They also tried to reduce the wages paid to the crews by $1.00 per day and force them to take lunch breaks on their own time.

In other matters, the project was notable because of Mr. Smith’s insistence on racially-integrated work crews. Naturally, there was a good deal of grumbling over this but, when the choices were cooperating or not getting hired, the outcome was obvious.

Mr. Samuels conducts Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the others into the elevator and takes them down to the powerhouse on the Nevada side of the dam, He says “this powerhouse and the one on the Arizona side are identical. Both are done in an art-deco style with floors of black granite and wall of white marble. Each powerhouse has twelve 130-megawatt turbines, plus a 2.5-MW Pelton-type turbine to produce power needed to run the dam’s operations. In total, the generating capacity is 3,120 megawatts; this equates to 27 terawatt-hours on a yearly basis. As of now, 30% of the power generated here goes to the aluminum smelting plant in Boulder City, Nevada, 25% to the State of Nevada, 20% to the State of Arizona and the balance of 25% distributed between such customers as Southern California Edison and the cities of Los Angeles, Glendale, Pasadena, Riverside, Anaheim and Burbank.”

Mr. Smith takes over the narration and says “Joanne, one of the dam’s secondary purposes was to control flooding on the Colorado River and provide water for irrigation and municipal uses. This water comes from the reservoir (which I named Lake Mead) behind the dam; this reservoir holds 26,120,000 acre-feet of water at maximum capacity. Canals which feed from here are responsible for irrigating upwards of 400,000 hectares of land.” Faulkner replies “I’m sure the farmers here in the southwest appreciate your efforts, Jim.”

“Exactly. Without that water, agriculture would be next to impossible all throughout that area.”

The tour continues onwards and once it is completed, it’s off to Boulder City, Nevada to visit the SmithCorp Aluminum smelter there. Now that orders for aircraft are ramping up, production at the smelter is increasing by leaps and bounds. This plant produces primary aluminum (from bauxite shipped in by rail) and secondary aluminum from scrap. It is both an alumina refinery (extracting aluminum oxide from bauxite) and a smelter. The alumina is extracted from bauxite by the Bayer process and the aluminum is extracted from the aluminum oxide by the Hall–Héroult process; here, aluminum oxide is dissolved in molten cryolite to lower its melting point. Vast amounts of electricity are applied through the carbon electrodes, this causes the aluminum to separate from its oxide and settle to the bottom of the cell. At present, the smelter has 720 pots with a capacity of one ton each of aluminum per day; there are plans to increased this number by five-fold. At Mr. Smith’s insistence, the plant was fitted with pollution-control equipment which removes the flouride waste (perfluorocarbons, gaseous hydrogen fluoride, sodium & aluminum flourides and unused cryolite) and keeps it from getting into the environment. Part of this involves a process whereby used electrolytic pot linings are converted back into aluminum fluoride for re-use and the manufacture of synthetic sand for construction purposes.

In Old Las Vegas
Date: September 5th, 1941
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Time: 2:00 PM

After visiting the aluminum smelter in Boulder City, Nevada, Smith & Faulkner proceed to Las Vegas. For Joanne, this is something of a homecoming as she was based here before Mr. Smith recalled her. While residing in Las Vegas and serving as Mr. Smith’s personal representative here, Faulkner had charge of all the artistes working in Mr. Smith’s casinos and the stand-alone joy houses near his properties on Las Vegas Boulevard. By mutual agreement between Al Capone and Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner also runs the artistes working for at the Capone Organization’s hotels and casinos. Not surprisingly, rates of social disease in Las Vegas have trended down almost to zero because Faulkner instituted the same policies she had in effect while running the Outfit’s joy houses back in Chicago. As regards rough trade (meaning customers who like to beat on the artistes that are entertaining them), Joanne Faulkner’s policy is quite explicit. All such offenders are immediately expelled; anyone of them who tries to come back a second time either gets a severe beating or a trip out to the desert (depending on how rough that individual tried to be)

Las Vegas is significantly larger in the present year than it was at the same time back in Mr. Smith’s original history, with a total population of 30,000. The seeds of the city’s growth and future potential were first planted when construction began on Black Canyon Dam and the highway bypass on U.S Route 93 back in 1931. At its height, there were some 10,000 workers on-site. When the dam was completed, many of these men went on to work at others of Mr. Smith’s construction projects (the Golden Gate Bridge, among them). However, more than a few elected to stay to work at the SmithCorp aluminum smelter in Boulder City. Next, another source of growth in Las Vegas is the city’s casinos and resorts; substantial numbers of visitors come to Vegas from California (where gambling is still illegal), while still others come by bus and car from Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and points east. In a promising development, there has even been traffic from the East Coast (in the form of well-to-do visitors who flew into Las Vegas and landed at McCarran Airport).

A third factor in the growth of Las Vegas is the city’s location; ideally-placed to serve as a stopover for passenger trains, private automobiles and long-haul trucks coming into southern California. Though visits from the traveling public are expected to decline with the coming war later this year, this shortfall will be made up by military personnel on pass from the USAAF’s Flexible Gunnery School at Las Vegas Army Airfield just north of the city. This base was converted from McCarran Field (the former civilian airport of the same name), with construction on barracks and other base facilities starting in March of this year. Actual flight training began in June, with ten AT-6 Texan advanced flight training aircraft and 17 Martin B-10 medium bombers on site. These numbers will be greatly-augmented by layovers of bus & train traffic carrying military personnel into southern California.

Las Vegas is a closed city, meaning that no one outside of the Capone Organization or Mr. Smith’s people is allowed to own or operate any hotel, casino or other ‘entertainment’ venue. Between the two of them, Capone and Smith run a very tight ship; all of the table games and slot machines are honestly-run and pay out winnings fairly, while attempts at cheating in the casinos are dealt in a public fashion with by entering a first-time offender’s name, picture and other identifying information in a confidential file called the ‘black book’. Anyone in the book is permanently-barred from ever entering any casino or hotel in Las Vegas ever again; a second attempt at entry is handled by a private ‘wall-to-wall’ counseling session. Third offenses are handled in private; it is an unwritten policy of Al Capone and Mr. Smith than anyone who attempts to come back a third time after being black-booked gets taken on a one-way ride out into the desert. Another point of agreement between Capone and Smith concerns racial segregation; it’s bad for business. So, each and every casino, resort and hotel all throughout Las Vegas is open to clientele of any race. The only color of importance in the city isn’t white, black, brown, yellow or red; it’s green, the color of money.

In with the Big Man
Date: September 5th, 1941
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Time: 7:00 PM

After checking into the hotel at the Big Nugget Casino (the first property built on Las Vegas Boulevard), Mr. Smith calls to make an appointment to see Al Capone in his headquarters at the Four Deuces Casino (named after his old club back in Chicago). The arrangements are made quickly and, after dinner, Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the rest of his party are on the way to see the Big Man. The meeting takes place in Capone’s office in the back of the Four Deuces, and they are escorted there by Jack McGurn (who is now working as Capone’s head of security).

Just then, Capone is working with his accountants in totaling the receipts from the month previously. He looks up from his desk, dismisses his accountants and says “if it ain’t my old pal Jim Smith. What do you know? What do you say?” The two men shake hands like they’re old friends (which they are), then Capone greets Faulkner and says “how are you doing, Joanne? You got a good crew running things with the Joy Houses, you know. When are you planning to come back?”

Faulkner replies “I am doing well, sir; and I thank you for your compliments. As to when I’m coming back, that will be as soon as I complete my current duty assignment with Mr. Smith.”

Capone gestures for Smith & Faulkner to take their seats. Mr. Smith waves off his guards and says “Why don’t you all head out to the casino floor and have a good time?” Capone speaks up and says to them “see the pit boss and tell him I said that you’ve each got a $1,000 credit line. The artistes are also to extend the full courtesies of the house.” Once Mr. Smith’s people file out of the office, Capone says “Smith, what brings you all the way out here?”

“Sir, over the last several weeks, I have taken it upon myself to visit all of my business interests throughout the United States; I thought this a reasonable course of action, especially because of the likelihood of war in the next several months. You’ve probably read in the papers how I’ve been busy filling contracts with the War Department for ships, planes and tanks? Well, I’ve got a feeling that they’re going to be needed before too much longer.”

“So I have heard, Smith. You’ve come kinda far, ever since we first met back in February of 1928, haven’t you?’

“I certainly have, Mr. Capone. You gave me my start and for that, I am eternally grateful. Now, I’m wealthy beyond the dreams of avarice, and I’m putting my money to work in the service of the nation; but, enough of me. How are you doing out here in Las Vegas?”

“Smith, I’ve got to tell you that I’m making more money than I know what to do with. My best year back in Chicago was 1929; it saw my net income at $60,000,000. Now, I’m taking in more than $1,500,000.00 per week; my bean counters tell me that the total for the current year will be $80,000,000. The best thing is that all of my operations here are legitimate. I’ve got my brother Ralph running things for me back in Chicago, with Tony Accardo as consigliere and Frankie Yale as underboss. Fixer Fischetti is handing the money side of the operation, and everything’s just copacetic. I usually run things from that place you got me up by Lake Tahoe; it’s nice and cool up there. When I heard that you were coming to see me, I decided to come down here for a while.”

“Indeed, sir. I know how hot it gets here in the southwest; I’d be willing to bet that air conditioning has made a real difference in the hotels & casinos, attendance-wise.”

“You got that right, Smith. When it’s 105+ degrees outside, there’s nothing people like to do more than to come inside, relax where its 30 degrees cooler and spend some money at the tables and on the machines. Publicity’s another thing; you remember that poker championship idea you had a while back? Well, it’s working like a charm. The best players in the country have showed up to take part, and all kinds of people come by just to see the action. The last time the event was held was back in May of this year, and the guy who won it began with a buy-in of $100.00 at one of the open-field tables. You should have seen the look on this face when he was the last player standing at the final table; it was priceless.”

Mr. Smith replies “of course, Mr. Capone. The publicity is why I suggested the idea of the poker championship to you in the first place.”

The rest of the evening passes in discussing various topics of interest to both men. Just before leaving, Mr. Smith says “Mr. Capone, you’ll be very pleased to hear how your son Albert is doing. As you will recall, I hired him to come and work at Union State Private Bank; his direct supervisor is Roger Mortimer, the bank’s manager. Mr. Mortimer has nothing but high praise for how Albert carries out his work, and has recommended him for a bonus and a promotion; I’ve already signed off on the recommendation, and Albert will be getting the bonus with his next paycheck.”

Capone grins widely and replies “thanks for letting me know, Smith. Mae will be very pleased to hear what’s happening with my son.”

“You’re quite welcome, sir.”

From Bad to Worse
Date: September 6th, 1941
Location: Leningrad, Russia
Time: various

Acting under instructions given by Adolf Hitler on August 6th, Army Group North (commanded by Feldmarschall Wilhelm Ritter von Leeb and consisting of the 18th and 16th Armies) began its advance on the Russian city of Leningrad. In this action, Army Group North was reinforced by the 3rd and 4th Panzer Groups. The participation of troops from Finland had been requested from President Risto Ryti; after due consideration, Field Marshal Carl Mannerheim was ordered to refuse the request. This marks one of two changes from Mr. Smith’s original history, where the II, III and IV Corps of the Finnish Army made a series of attacks around both flanks of Lake Ladoga in order to draw off as much Russian strength as possible. The second change was that there is no narrow land corridor between Lake Ladoga and Leningrad through which supplies could be delivered; in the original history, the supplies delivered through this corridor are what kept the city from falling to the Germans.

Between August 6th and September 6th, the combined German forces conducted a campaign which saw them capture the cities of Pskov, Novgorod and Ostrov in quick succession. On September 6th, Leningrad’s last remaining road links were severed and the siege began. From Wehrmacht Headquarters in Berlin, Generaloberst Alfred Jodl issued orders to Army Group North that all offers of capitulation from Leningrad were to be ignored; the city was to be destroyed and its population reduced by forced starvation. As soon as the city was encircled, an intense barrage from long-range artillery began, supported by round-the-clock bombing & incendiary raids from the Luftwaffe. The first of these raids took place late in the afternoon of August 6th, with 276 Luftwaffe bombers (primarily Heinkel He177s, Junkers Ju-86s, Junkers Ju-87 ‘Stukas’ and Dornier Do-17s) dropping a mix of incendiaries, SD-4 cluster bombs and medium-weight SC-250 demolition bombs; the purpose of this raid and others like it is to deny shelter to the residents of Leningrad and to degrade the city’s firefighting ability. To further complicate matters, some of the SC-250s were fitted with time-delay Type 17 electric clockwork fuzes and Type ZUS-40 mechanical anti-handling fuzes (or Type 50 electric anti-handling fuzes).

Given Leningrad’s importance to the overall Soviet war effort (having 11% of Russia’s industrial output), the Red Army was ordered to defend the city to the last. The Soviet forces tasked with carrying out this order are the 7th, 8th, 14th and 23rd Armies; commanded by Lieutenant General Markian M. Popov. This force was further enhanced by the Luga Operations Group, the Kingisepp Operations Group and an additional 3 rifle divisions, 4 guard militia divisions, and a rifle brigade. Before Leningrad was encircled, General Popov saw to it that as much supplies and materiel were brought into the city as possible. Additionally, his troops and the civilian population of the city were tasked with constructing a series of defensive works, which eventually included 190 miles of timber barricades, 395 miles of wire entanglements, 430 miles of anti-tank ditches, 5,000 earth & timber and reinforced concrete weapons emplacements plus 16,000 miles of open trenches. Despite the incredible amount of effort expended in the construction of these works and the valor of Leningrad’s defenders, the city is not expected to hold out for more than three or four months.

Consolidation
Date: September 12th, 1941
Location: Washington, D.C.
Time: various

The War Department office building known as the Pentagon is nearing completion. Ground was broken on the project back on December 11th, 1941 and progress was rapidly made. The project is scheduled to be completed in March of 1942; when it is done, the Pentagon will be the world’s largest office building. The structure is designed to consolidate all of the War Department’s command & control functions under one roof, rather than to have the various agencies of the department scattered in office buildings (such as the Navy Building, the Munitions Building and others) across Washington, D.C.

The first 1,000,000 square feet of office space was available for occupancy in April, 1941. When War Department staffers began to move in, they were struck with a sense of awe at the gargantuan scale of the project. At present, the building is 75% complete with 2,800,000 square feet of its total in active use; with the remaining 900,000 squar feet to be completed between now and March, 1942.

The entire site is 280 acres in extent; those parts of the complex not occupied by parking lots are very carefully landscaped so as to conceal the presence of pillboxes and concrete obstacles. Of particular interest is how the roof of the building is designed. The exterior edge has a sort of battlement, from which security troops can engage attackers; the platforms on each of the five interior and exterior corners has been specially-reinforced so as to accommodate anti-aircraft guns. The five interior platforms each have a single M-1 120-mm superheavy AA gun, while the five outer platforms each have an M1A1 90-mm heavy AA gun.

These guns are controlled from a tower built in the Pentagon’s central courtyard above a restaurant which some officers have started to jokingly call the ‘Ground Zero Café. Each gun has its own searchlight; on top of the tower, there is a gun-laying radar. Inside the tower, there are two gun directors and two digital automatic gun data computers (one of each for the two types of guns).

The overall project manager is General Leslie Groves (promoted from his former rank of Colonel due to the project’s scale and importance). At Mr. Smith’s insistence, General Groves ordered that the work site be desegregated. Though the Pentagon is actually located in Virginia, the land on which it sits is Federal property; therefore the state’s racial segregation laws do not apply. Certain elements within the state (namely Governor James H. Price, Attorney-General Abraham Staples and Senator Harry F. Bird) were vehemently opposed to this; Mr. Smith got involved and his immense personal prestige caused them to straighten up and fly right. Afterwards, President Roosevelt reviewed the Pentagon project, saw how fast it was progressing with integrated work crews and used this as justification for issuing Executive Order 8802 on June 25th, 1941; which order reading as follows:

‘Whereas it is the policy of the United States to encourage full participation in the national defense program by all citizens of the United States, regardless of race, creed, color, or national origin, in the firm belief that the democratic way of life within the Nation can be defended successfully only with the help and support of all groups within its borders’


Operation: Grand Slam
Date: September 17th, 1941
Location: Tehran, Iran
Time: various

Previously on August 25th, the forces of Great Britain and the Soviet Union undertook Operation: Countenance; an invasion of Iran. Britain came in by land and air from Iraq, along with support from the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy in the Persian Gulf; Russia attacked from the north through Transcaucasia. The purposes behind the invasion were two-fold, with the first one being to secure Iranian oil fields for the Allies and to protect the Persian Corridor supply route into the Soviet Union. Additionally, it was thought that Reza Shah (the ruler of Iran) was friendly to Nazi Germany. In point of fact, the country was neutral. Iran’s defense of its national territory was composed of equal parts incompetence/cowardice (as when Brigadier-General Qaderi abandoned his troops and ordered that trucks bringing supplies to him be unloaded to make room for his personal belongings) and bravery (where, at the city of Qazvin, General Mohammad Shahbakhti held off a determined British advance). Still, the issue was never in doubt because of the overwhelming advantages in firepower, men and volume of equipment held by the British and the Soviets. By August 29th, Iran’s military situation had become hopeless. Therefore, Reza Shah ordered his troops to stop fighting. Afterwards, Iran was divided into British and Soviet spheres of influence.

On September 14th, The Soviets ordered the Shah to hand over all German nationals remaining in Iran to be handed over. In the case of those handed to the British, this would have meant being imprisoned; for those handed to the Soviets, this would have meant certain death. Naturally, Reza Shah was reluctant to comply. This delay allowed most of the Germans and their families to escape over the border and into Turkey. General Dmitri Koslov (the overall Soviet commander) and his officers were furious at the Shah’s defiance and so, on September 16th, moved to take over the capital city of Tehran. The next day, Russian troops entered the city.

Not surprisingly, the Soviet advance created a great deal of civil unrest. The city’s upper and middle class population feared what kind of treatment they would receive at the hands of the Russians, and riots of all sizes broke out all over the city as Iranian police and military personnel struggled to maintain control. Never one to let an opportunity pass by, Mr. Smith passed an order to Otis Needleman to dispatch a force of 50 men from the Operations Division to Tehran. These men were disguised as internal security troops of the NKVD and were armed and equipped as such. To further the deception, Mr. Smith’s agents were ordered to speak only in Russian.

The objective of this operation is the Central Bank of Iran, located in downtown Tehran. Iran has substantial gold reserves in the bank, but these aren’t the target. Instead, Mr. Smith is after the Crown Jewels of Iran (accumulated by the rulers of the Safavid Dynasty between 1502 and 1736 and now held in the bank as part of the Imperial Treasury). The secondary objectives are to drive a wedge between Russia and Britain and to firmly seat Reza Shah in the British sphere of influence.

On the evening of September 17th, Mr. Smith’s agents drove into the city in Soviet vehicles. One group was assigned to destroy the city’s telephone exchange in order to keep calls for help from going out; this group also created further disturbances throughout the city in order to keep Iranian police personnel and military troops off-balance. The second group carefully approached the bank’s compound then at a signal, attacked the bank’s headquarters building and neutralized the on-site security force. Immediately afterwards, the main vaults were blasted open. As an afterthought, the compartments where Iran’s gold reserves were stored were left open and unsecured (the idea being that the local populace would come to see what happened and in so doing, help themselves to some of the gold.

Date: September 18th, 1941
Location: Tehran, Iran

When the circumstances of what happened last night were discovered, it didn’t take Reza Shah very long at all to receive a report. When he did, he flew into a towering rage; urged along in part by his pro-British Prime Minister Ali Mansur (who sought to keep from being relieved by the Shah over charges that he had contributed to Iran’s defeat by demoralizing the army). As the Russians would have completely ignored him, Reza Shah sought an immediate meeting with the British commander General Edward Quinan. This was granted, and the Shah told General Quinan what had happened. Afterwards, Quinan went to his Soviet counterpart General Koslov and requested an explanation. Koslov indignantly denied that any Soviet military forces were involved, and that any indications to the contrary were an insult against the peace-loving workers and peasants of the Soviet Union.

Privately, General Koslov fumed; this news about the attack from General Quinlan took him quite by surprise. Enquiries back to Moscow were replied to with emphatic denials that the NKVD had anything to do with the theft. It was further indicated to Koslov that (based on the scale and sophistication of the assault), the British may have staged it as a ‘false flag’ operation in order to discredit the Soviet Union. Meanwhile, back at his headquarters, General Quinlan spoke to his chief of staff General William Slim and said “I say Bill, it would be just like those damned Russians to have pulled this job and blame us for it.” General Slim replies “quite right, sir. I have never trusted the Russians, despite all the confidence that the Prime Minister has in them.”

In any case, the immediate aftereffects of the raid on the Central Bank of Iran was that, instead of abdicating the throne in favor of his son Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Reza Shah stayed on the throne and completely aligned himself with the British; he also retained Ali Mansur as his Prime Minister and confirmed the order of succession for the principal Qajar claimant, Crown Prince Hamid Hassan Mirza. The Soviets weren’t the least bit pleased at this turn of events, and responded by arresting one of Reza Shah’s younger sons: Mohammad Reza Pahlavi. (in the original history, Pahlavi became Shah after his father abdicated on September 19th, 1941).

Before jumping back to the Alpha Site, Mr. Smith’s agents paused to examine and document the incredible haul that they had made. Among the most historically-significant pieces are the crowns used by the Shah, his wife and other members of the Royal Family, the Royal Mace of Iran (measuring 2’5” long and encrusted end-to-end with large diamonds and spinels), the sword & shield of Nader Shah (both heavily engraved, chased with gold and encrusted with various types of gems), the Imperial Sword of State (a cavalry-pattern saber with a gilded hilt set with a profusion of jewels, principally emeralds), eleven other jeweled swords & shields, the Golden Flagon, the Coronation Belt, the Great Globe (on this item, the oceans are made of emeralds set into the surface), the Imperial Dinner service (a set of dinner dishes and other serving appliances made of gold, silver and set with gems), the Imperial State Crown, a number ofother, lesser crowns, thirty jeweled tiaras used by princesses of the Iranian Royal House in times past, dozens of jeweled aigrettes (hat ornaments), various necklaces both great and small, and chests of jewelry and unset gems. The only items not taken were the Shah’s coronation cape and the Naderi Throne, as they are in storage at the Shah’s palace.

Reaching an Understanding
Date: September 29th, 1941
Location: Moscow, Russia
Time: 10:00 AM local time

On this date, a meeting which will coem to be known as the Moscow Conference took place between Averell Harriman (representing the United States and accompanied by Mr. Smith’s man Richard Leavitt), Max Aitken 1st Baron Beaverbrook (representing Great Britain) and Andrey Vyshinsky (acting on behalf of Josef Stalin, leader of the Soviet Union). Previously, Vyshinsky had served as Deputy Foreign Minister under Vyacheslav Molotov; however, when Molotov was executed for his supposed complicty in the loss of the Moscow Gold, Vyshinsky was promoted to the position of Minister of Foreign Affairs.

The purpose of this meeting is to give assurances that Russia would not fight the Nazis alone, and to coordinate the delivery of military aid to Russia. Unlike in the original history, the portion of what would have been known as ‘Lend Lease’ provided to Russia is coming entirely from stocks of materiel held by SmithCorp and from that entity’s vast industrial production. The meeting’s first session takes place in the Council of Ministers Building, and begins with Minister Vyshinsky saying “welcome to Moscow, gentlemen. I trust that you had a pleasant-enough trip.”

Averell Harriman replies “as pleasant as any long-distance trip can be during wartime can be, Minister.” Mr. Leavitt requests permisison to speak and says “Minister Vyshinsky, on behalf of my employer Mr. James Smith, I would like to compliment the wisdom that the government of the Soviet Union showed in acceding to the terms of Mr. Smith’s offfer to provide material aid to your country’s war effort. This acceptance didn’t come a moment too soon, especially in light of what happened on August 28th when the Nazis captured Talinn, Estonia and your government ordered that the Dnieper Hydroelectric Station be dynamited to deny its capture by the Nazis. Then, there’s the matter of the city of Leningrad being entirely surrounded and cut off by the Wehrmacht’s Army Group North.”

Averell Harriman and Lord Beaverbrook look at Mr. Leavitt with amazement, as it is plain that he is better-informed than they are. Minister Vyshinsky fixes his eyes on Leavitt and says “how did you comer by this information, sir? I categorically deny that my government did anything at the Dniepr Station; as far as what supposedly happened in Talinn, Estonia, those are nothing more than vile rumors spread by those damned Nazis.”

A slight, businesslike smile crosses Mr. Leavitt’s face as he says “come now, Minister Vyshinsky; you and I both know that I am speaking the absolute truth. If you wish, I can provide pictures of the damage at Dniepr Station and a complete list of all the losses in ships and men at Talinn. As to how I came by this information, it goes without saying that my employer Mr. Smith is well-versed in any areas that are of interest to him.”

Vyshinsky knows that his statements are so much tissue paper, so he deflects attention from them by saying ‘just so, Mr. Leavitt; just so. Gentlemen, let us now turn our attention to the business at hand, shall we?”


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
If I remember correct until Woodward Wilson, the Federal Work Force was at least in part desegregated, Wilson undid that.

One little detail that the Democrats don't want to admit, northeast liberals can be racist.

Excellent work

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
jemhouston wrote:
If I remember correct until Woodward Wilson, the Federal Work Force was at least in part desegregated, Wilson undid that.

One little detail that the Democrats don't want to admit, northeast liberals can be racist.

Excellent work


I despise Wilson like few others.

Part of the encouragement given to those officials in Virginia came from Mr. Smith's ferocious reputation with the Klan; no one, but NO one crosses him more than once....

ITTl, if anything like the Iranian Revolution of the late 1970's had happened, that's when Mr. Smith would have made his move against the Crown Jewels. The chaos created by the Soviet advance on Tehran seemed to be the perfect opportunity for any early strike. Not only will Iran be FIRMLY in the western camp, that little problem with Reza Pahlavi will never come up this time around.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Jul 23, 2017 10:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
The End of the Beginning
Date: October 4th, 1941
Location: on the way to San Diego
Time: 2:00 PM

After leaving Las Vegas, Smith & Faulkner’s grand tour continues with brief visits to Mr. Smith’s other properties in Nevada. These include the Carlin Trend, the Getchell Trend, the Alligator Ridge Group and the Battle Mountain-Eureka Trend. These properties comprise the majority of the ‘undiscovered’ gold deposits in Nevada, and are currently on stand-by in anticipation of the need for future production. Also on the itinerary is a visit to the Nevada portion of the McDermitt Caldera Complex (one of Mr. Smith’s largest individual land holdings in the continental United States). Here, there are large deposits of such metals as uranium, vanadium, mercury, antimony, cesium, lithium and various rare earths.

While on the way to California aboard their private train, Faulkner turns to Mr. Smith and says “Jim, does it trouble you to know that you can’t do more, to save more people from being killed by the Nazis?” A brief tremor of rage crosses Smith’s face as he replies “Joanne, I think of this very thing every night. Millions of people are going to die, and sometimes it seems that all of my efforts are nothing more than a bandage on a sucking chest wound. With all of my wealth, power and influence, I can do anything. However, if I tried to do everything, I could accomplish nothing. In the future, there will come a time for me to fold my tent and pass through Fiddler’s Green on the way to the other side. When I deliver my personal after-action report to the Man upstairs, I would have it said of me that I left the world a better place than when I started.”

An expression of sympathy and understanding crosses Faulkner’s face as she says “Jim, you are without doubt, one of the finest men it’s ever been my pleasure to know; it’s also been one of the highest honors of my life to serve under your command. You should take comfort in the knowledge that your efforts have spared hundreds of thousands of people (who would have otherwise been murdered by the Russians, the Nazis and the Imperial Japanese); they will now live and have families of their own.”

“Thanks, Joanne. That’s just the kind of encouragement I needed.”

“You’re welcome, boss. What’s next on the travel agenda?”

“We’ll be travelling all throughout California, meeting and greeting various people (like Governor Culbert Olson, William Hearst and Jack Dragna). We’ll also be visiting my mining properties at Mountain Pass, plus RKO Studios and my shipyards. I also intend to visit the 32nd Street Naval Station in San Diego, as this is where those two supercarriers and four super battleships I built for the U.S Navy are home-ported.”

“Is there some other particular reason why you want to go there?”

“Of course there is. After Japan pays the U.S a visit at Pearl Harbor, the American public will be itching for some payback. I’ll have skin in the game as the principal backer of Doolittle’s raid on Tokyo; my version of the raid will come in the form of 16 Hercules ‘Combat Talon’ aircraft launched from the decks of those two carriers. As for visiting the battleships; well, I’ve always had a thing for big guns, and they don’t come any bigger or more powerful than those 16”/50s. Afterwards, we’ll be staging out of Los Angeles until it’s time to head over to Niihau Station. My plan is that Lindbergh, Cochrane, May Day and the others will come out to Los Angeles from New Mexico by train along with their jets and equipment in the second week of October. Then, the squadron will be transported to Hawaii aboard two of my ships and we’ll be along for the ride.”

“Sounds like a plan, boss.”

“Excellent. While we’re in Los Angeles, I’ve got a side project for you.” A look of curiosity comes across Faulkner’s face as she says “oh, what’s that?”

“In our original history after the attack on Pearl Harbor, FDR issued Executive Order 9066, which allowed local military commanders to prescribe certain areas within their jurisdictions as ‘Military Zones’ and to allow them to expel and incarcerate those of Japanese, German and Italian ancestry called for their internment. In a sign of the racism endemic of those times, 120,000 men, women and children of Japanese ancestry were expelled from various areas of the West Coast and held at various places like Manzanar in Owens Valley, California and nine other locations elsewhere. By way of comparison, those of German and Italian ancestry subjected to the order numbered just 11,000 and 3,000 respectively. Another indication that the expulsions were motivated by something other than military necessity was the fact that the Issei and Nissei constituted some 40% of the population of the Territory of Hawaii; yet, only 3,000-4,000 such people were ever detained there. One of the principal architects of the policy of expulsion in California is General John L. DeWitt; currently the commanding officer of the IX Corps Area and stationed at the Presidio in San Diego. DeWitt is an ardent Sinophobe who, in the original history, clashed with Governor Olson over the former’s plans to carry out the expulsions.”

“I understand. That DeWitt character sounds like a titanic asshole; what do you want me to do with him?”

Mr. Smith drums his fingers on the desk for a few seconds, then says “I want DeWitt taken out of the picture. Since he hasn’t done anything to the Issei and Nissei just yet, it doesn’t seem right to have the guy knocked off; still, he’s a scab on the ass of humanity. I’ll be satisfied if you can come up with a way to destroy his credibility; if you can do it in such a way as to cause DeWitt to eat his own gun, so much the better.”

“I love a challenge, Jim. Give me the next five days and I’ll come up with something for your consideration.”

Three hours later, Mr. Smith’s private train pulls into San Diego’s Union Station on Kettner Boulevard. Just as it does, a call comes in from Otis Needleman to the communications panel in the car’s main conference room. Mr. Smith activates the view screen and says “go ahead, Otis. What do you have for me?”

“Hello, Jim. I wanted to let you know that I received a call form Jim Rodgers, head of the Virginia Section. He tells me that his people have completed the last of the land purchases in Pittsylvania County, Virginia. In all, there are two parcels in the city of Chatham measuring a total of 7,315 acres. What these last purchases mean is that you now have control of the last major uranium deposit in the United States that you didn’t already own.”

“Excellent. Give my compliments to Jim and his crew and tell them that I said well done. Please refresh my memory as to the statistics of the deposit.”

Otis refers to one of the files on his desk and says “Jim, there are two separate and economically-viable ore bodies in Chatham. Together, they total 160,000,000 tons that grades out at 0.056%; this comes to 89,600 tons of uranium oxide. There is also a very substantial quantity of lower-quality ore; 320,000,000 tons at a grade of 0.025%. This lower-quality ore has a total of 80,000 tons of uranium oxide. Ordinarily, this material would have been left in the ground. However, the advanced recovery techniques that we have access to means that it is economically viable, also.”

Just now, the train comes to a stop. Before debarking, Mr. Smith details twelve of his guards to act as a security element for the train while it’s parked at Union Station. In the meantime, he and the rest of the party are met by representatives from the California Section and driven to the U.S Grant Hotel on Broadway Street in downtown San Diego. The one in charge of the detail is Louise Kellner, who says “welcome back to California, boss. What’s on the agenda?”

“Hello, Louise. For now, get us to the hotel so we can relax and get cleaned up. After we get checked in, please make arrangements for me to visit the 32nd Street Naval Station in two days.”

“Understood, boss.”

Indications of Strength
Date: October 6th, 1941
Location: 32nd Street Naval Station, San Diego
Time: 9:00 AM

After a relaxing two days in the best hotel that San Diego has to offer, Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the rest of his party are driven to the Naval Station on 32nd Street. Upon arriving, they are met by Lt. Cmdr Roger Stearns (representing the base’s commanding officer). Greetings are exchanged and Lt. Cmdr Stearns says “Mr. Smith, Ms. Faulkner, on behalf of Captain Curtis Jones, welcome
to Naval Base San Diego.”

“Thank you, Commander. I’ve come to see what the Navy’s doing with the supercarriers and battleships that my company built. Since conflict in the Pacific seems to be in the offing, I think it only proper to familiarize myself with those ships and how they operate.”

“Of course, sir. If you and your party will please follow me, I’ll have you all driven dockside.”

Lt. Cmdr Stearns escorts Smith, Faulkner and the others to a nearby parking lot where a number of official sedans (painted in battleship gray) are waiting to pick them up. Smith & Faulkner join Lt. Cmdr Stearns in the first car, while the other two are transporting Mr. Smith’s other staff. Within a few minutes, the three cars pull up to the quays where the two carriers and four battleships are moored.

The party alights, and Lt. Cmdr Stearns says “well, sir; what do you think?’ Mr. Smith’s field of vision takes in the six steel colossi. He remarks with evident satisfaction “commander, I like what I see. What do the officers and men think of their ships?”

“Sir, the crews couldn’t regard their ships any better than they do now. Those six ships are excellent seaboats, with plenty of room in the engineering and berthing spaces; the battleships are good, stable gun platforms than can fire their guns even in the heaviest weather.”

“I’m pleased to hear that. There’s nothing that makes a sailor feel better than to have the deck of a fast, powerful ship under his feet. Henry J. Kaiser and I took great pleasure in designing these vessels; we wanted them to be as capable as possible (while still leaving room for further modifications if necessary).”

Over the next three hours, Lt. Cmdr Stearns shows Mr. Smith and the rest of his party over practically ever inch of the battleship USS Iowa. Following this is a visit to the aircraft carrier USS Essex. Lt. Cmdr Stearns takes particular pleasure in pointing out the carrier’s air group, which consists of 90 aircraft in five squadrons; three squadrons of F7 Firecats and two squadrons of Skyraider attack planes. The fighter squadrons are titled VF-15, VF-16 and VF-17; of these, VF-15 is commanded by Cmdr (promotable) David McCampbell

The day ends with Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the others being hosted at a dinner given by Captain Donald B. Duncan (commanding officer of USS Essex) in the Officer’s Mess. To show his appreciation for the courtesies that he and his party experienced during the visit, Mr. Smith gifts Captain Duncan with two boxes of Gran Corona cigars, a cased pair of W. L Evans Model 1826 Navy flintlock pistols and a presentation-grade naval officer’s sword from the Revolutionary War.

Later that night back at the hotel, Joanne Faulkner says “Jim, bearing in mind what you said earlier about wanting to take General DeWitt out of the picture without killing him, I’ve come up with a couple of different ways that your objective can be accomplished.” Mr. Smith replies “go ahead; I’m listening.”

“Even though the United States is getting ready to go to war, the Army is still very much being run on a peacetime basis; in part, this means that the higher echelons are very image-conscious, so to speak. Any officer who does anything to tarnish this image will (career-wise) quickly find himself with a first-class seat on a fast train to nowhere. My first idea with regards to DeWitt is to contrive a situation whereby he gets into a traffic accident and, upon subsequent investigation, is found to be drunk. My second idea is that DeWitt (who is supposedly a happily-married family man) gets found in bed with a woman not his wife, which person just happens to be a someone of ill-repute; of course, there will be photographs to document the ‘unfortunate’ circumstances. If the traffic accident is to be arranged, I’ll put some icing on the cake by having four ounces of cocaine planted in DeWitt’s car. As Harry Anglinger and his bunch of cowboy assholes at the Bureau of Narcotics have such a hate-on for illegal drugs and the people that use them, they’ll be all over DeWitt like paint on a wall. Lastly (regardless of whatever set of circumstances is chosen), I’ll have a selection of literature from those morons in ‘America First’ planted in DeWitt’s house.”

“Very good, Joanne. I’ll leave the matter in your capable hands.”

“Thanks, boss. I would suggest that you give the story of DeWitt’s car accident (or his being found in flagrante delicto) to your pal Hearst. If anything, this will inflame public opinion against DeWitt and get him bounced out of the service even faster.”

“An excellent suggestion. When you decide how to do for DeWitt; let me know and I’ll make the rest happen.”

Now, while the grand tour is ongoing, the situation over in Russia is rapidly going from bad to even worse. On October 2nd, the Wehrmacht began its all-out assault on Moscow under the heading of Operation: Typhoon. Averell Harriman, Richard Leavitt and Lord Beaverbrook were lucky to have escaped, as the Moscow Conference had only ended the day before the Nazi assault began.

Over the thirty days previous to today, the Nazis have inflicted a punishing amount of damage on the city of Leningrad (both by continuous air strikes and round-the-clock artillery barrages. The officer in overall command of the defenses of Leningrad is none other than Georgy Zhukov, holding at this time the position of commander of the Leningrad Front. By October 10th, the situation around Moscow had deteriorated to the point where Soviet dictator Josef Stalin issued orders for Zhukov to be recalled to take command of the city’s defenses. Unfortunately for General Zhukov, he never made it. As the Germans had Leningrad completely surrounded, the convoy which was to have transported Zhukov to Moscow was quickly detected and wiped out by a flight of JU-87 ‘Stuka’ dive bombers from StG 2.

Stalin received this news later on in the evening of October 10th and flew into a towering rage. His anger was further compounded by the fact that news had also been received that the Germans had overrun the Soviet defensive pocket outside the city of Vyazma and in so doing, had destroyed four entire Soviet armies (the 19th , 20th, 24th and 32nd). For the Wehrmacht, this victory meant than an additional 28 divisions are available for the attack on Moscow.

After Stalin’s subordinates managed to calm him down, orders were issued the very next day that People’s Commissar of Defense Semyon Timoshenko should have all of the women and children not directly involved in war work be evacuated from Moscow. This order was followed up by the evacuation of most of the Soviet government from Moscow on Wednesday, October 15th. The issuance of this unprecedented order came about because the Germans had captured the cities of Kalinin and Rzhev northwest of Moscow and had reached the city of Mozhaysk just 68 miles to the west of Moscow. Of all the highest-ranking officials of the Soviet government, only Stalin remained in Moscow (despite pleas from his military commanders that he should leave also).

For Mr. Smith and the rest of the Organization, the immediate consequences of these actions were that Foreign Minister Andrey Vishinsky (acting under Stalin’s express orders) sent word to Ambassador Konstantin Umansky that orders to SmithCorp for military supplies and materiel were to be doubled. In a related matter, shipments of gold from the bullion reserve held by the Free French are now being made to SmithCorp in care of the Banco Nacional de Cuba; this gold being used to pay for military supplies.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 5:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
With Zhukov's death, that's the first major butterfly against Mr. Smith's plans. He's good but not infallible.

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 6:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
jemhouston wrote:
With Zhukov's death, that's the first major butterfly against Mr. Smith's plans. He's good but not infallible.

Zhukov's demise seemed to be a logical conesquence of Leningrad being entirely cut off. That city will fall; Moscow will not, however it will undergo a siege like that of Leningrad ITTL.


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:09 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
Robert A. Heinlein went to Moscow in the 50s/60s. Based on his training, he didn't think Moscow was as big as the Soviets said at the time.

I take it Stalin will use Moscow as a giant fire sack?

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 7:41 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:49 pm
Posts: 10703
jemhouston wrote:
Robert A. Heinlein went to Moscow in the 50s/60s. Based on his training, he didn't think Moscow was as big as the Soviets said at the time.


A lot of people came to that conclusion quite independently. It wasn't until the late 1990s that Russian claims for Moscow's population came into line with what our recon assets were telling us. The Russians confused things further by taking the population data for Moscow Oblast and applying it to Moscow City.

_________________
Nations do not survive by setting examples for others.
Nations survive by making examples of others


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 8:56 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
jemhouston wrote:
I take it Stalin will use Moscow as a giant fire sack?

Precisely; pull the Nazis in, then beat them stupid... :twisted:


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
If I remember right, he couldn't figure out why we never called them on it.

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:49 pm
Posts: 10703
jemhouston wrote:
If I remember right, he couldn't figure out why we never called them on it.

The logic was quite simple, if we had, we would have exposed just how good our intelligence on Moscow in particular and Russia in general was. There wasn't much for us to gain by calling them on it and a lot for us to lose. So, we all sniggered quietly to ourselves and let the Russians get on with it. They still though we used their maps for targeting . . . .

There is a belief that Heinlein was taken quietly to one side and told to shut up about the issue.

_________________
Nations do not survive by setting examples for others.
Nations survive by making examples of others


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:02 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
Francis Urquhart wrote:
jemhouston wrote:
If I remember right, he couldn't figure out why we never called them on it.

The logic was quite simple, if we had, we would have exposed just how good our intelligence on Moscow in particular and Russia in general was. There wasn't much for us to gain by calling them on it and a lot for us to lose. So, we all sniggered quietly to ourselves and let the Russians get on with it. They still though we used their maps for targeting . . . .

There is a belief that Heinlein was taken quietly to one side and told to shut up about the issue.


Didn't work. I read it in at least one possible two of his books. Both were published before the fall of the Berlin Wall.

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 11:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:49 pm
Posts: 10703
jemhouston wrote:
Didn't work. I read it in at least one possible two of his books. Both were published before the fall of the Berlin Wall.


I think the books in question were originally published more or less together in the late 1950s (when the Heinleins returned from a trip to Russia) and scared the crap out of recon/intel people. He didn't pick the story up later so it seems as if the warning took. It wouldn't be the first time by the way that classified information has been compromised by a civilian putting together unclassified data in a way people hadn't expected. It happened here a long time ago.

_________________
Nations do not survive by setting examples for others.
Nations survive by making examples of others


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Jul 24, 2017 4:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
In other matters, I have to wonder how Vichy France is going to react when that 1,125 tons of gold bullion that they have stored in Dakar goes suddenly missing.

Not at all well, most likely.... 8-)


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 8:29 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat May 15, 2010 10:18 am
Posts: 6895
Location: Where the grass is green and the girls are pretty
Francis Urquhart wrote:
jemhouston wrote:
Didn't work. I read it in at least one possible two of his books. Both were published before the fall of the Berlin Wall.


I think the books in question were originally published more or less together in the late 1950s (when the Heinleins returned from a trip to Russia) and scared the crap out of recon/intel people. He didn't pick the story up later so it seems as if the warning took. It wouldn't be the first time by the way that classified information has been compromised by a civilian putting together unclassified data in a way people hadn't expected. It happened here a long time ago.

I do have to call into question whether or not we're protecting the right material with that policy.

If an observant layman can show that Moscow is significantly less populated than stated, based solely on empirical evidence (i.e., what he observed with his own senses, and sociological data his wife gathered in casual conversation), and THAT compromises classified information . . . then I have to wonder what in the heck we're protecting . . .

_________________
"The double tap is a myth. Shoot the threat until it goes away. Only then will his soul find peace." -- Dalai Lama


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 8:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Feb 16, 2009 5:32 pm
Posts: 6379
During the Truman Administration, DOD did a study of the US military using open source material. It was considered so accurate, most copies were destroyed, the rest were highly classified.

_________________
Faugh a Ballagh


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 9:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:49 pm
Posts: 10703
Poohbah wrote:
I do have to call into question whether or not we're protecting the right material with that policy. If an observant layman can show that Moscow is significantly less populated than stated, based solely on empirical evidence (i.e., what he observed with his own senses, and sociological data his wife gathered in casual conversation), and THAT compromises classified information . . . then I have to wonder what in the heck we're protecting . . .


In this case it was U-2 over-flights and (more generally) how good our cameras were and how skilled the photo-interpretation. You see, early on, the Soviets never realized how much information we could get from imagery. Their use of photography was primitive and very tactical, essentially pictures of front-line defenses etc. As a result, they were incredibly sloppy when defending against strategic level photo-recon. They would screen things very carefully against ground level observation and woe betide any citizen who looked at things the wrong way. But, they had no idea of how much we could learn just by looking at crates. They found out in time and got a lot more careful but that was years later.

jemhouston wrote:
During the Truman Administration, DOD did a study of the US military using open source material. It was considered so accurate, most copies were destroyed, the rest were highly classified.


Exploiting open-source information is a big thing in the intelligence community. There's a joke that if one wants the latest information on a highly classified project, one can either gain covert entry to the manufacturer's black site, pick the locks on their secure information vault, microfilm the documents, then exit the factory and smuggle the film out. Alternatively, one can go to the local library, Therefore one's agents charge for the former and do the latter

_________________
Nations do not survive by setting examples for others.
Nations survive by making examples of others


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 9:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2008 12:24 pm
Posts: 2740
Francis Urquhart wrote:
jemhouston wrote:
Didn't work. I read it in at least one possible two of his books. Both were published before the fall of the Berlin Wall.


I think the books in question were originally published more or less together in the late 1950s (when the Heinleins returned from a trip to Russia) and scared the crap out of recon/intel people. He didn't pick the story up later so it seems as if the warning took. It wouldn't be the first time by the way that classified information has been compromised by a civilian putting together unclassified data in a way people hadn't expected. It happened here a long time ago.


Sounds like a cool story...

I suppose it would get my fingers maimed, though...

_________________
Pointy-Haired Boss: Is experience exactly the same as pessimism?
Dilbert: Experience is much worse

Dilbert
October 20, 2016


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2017 5:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:37 pm
Posts: 625
I plan to have Ivan Konev takeover for Zhukov.

Once the Nazis lay siege to Moscow, this is going to bugger up the Soviets' use of rail to transport troops and materiel...


Top
 Profile Send private message  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 514 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 ... 26  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group