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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:05 pm 
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If you get the aircraft in bunkers and spaced out, not to mention a standing alert would help.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:45 pm 
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Belushi TD wrote:
"issue such orders as you see fit"????

So FDR has just commissioned Mr. Smith as a four star general AND admiral, with date of rank to predate that of Kimmel and everyone else?

Not really, a civilian adviser with the full backing of the President behind him


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I can understand the recommendations, but issuing orders to members of the military is a VERY different kettle of fish.

Belushi TD

Mr. Smith will make his 'suggestions' to Admiral Kimmel and General Short. If they fail to heed them, it will be their necks on the chopping block when FDR gets the word that they failed to cooperate.


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 6:49 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
If you get the aircraft in bunkers and spaced out, not to mention a standing alert would help.

If General Short isn't colossally stupid, he'll do this very thing.

When the IJN aircraft start to make their attacks, they are going to feel like they shoved their babymakers into a meat grinder operating at war emergency power.


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 7:16 pm 
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Garrity wrote:
Belushi TD wrote:
"issue such orders as you see fit"????

So FDR has just commissioned Mr. Smith as a four star general AND admiral, with date of rank to predate that of Kimmel and everyone else?

Not really, a civilian adviser with the full backing of the President behind him


Quote:
I can understand the recommendations, but issuing orders to members of the military is a VERY different kettle of fish.

Belushi TD

Mr. Smith will make his 'suggestions' to Admiral Kimmel and General Short. If they fail to heed them, it will be their necks on the chopping block when FDR gets the word that they failed to cooperate.


Mr. Smith sends a telegraph to FDR to the situation and his ideas for correcting it. FDR as a former under secretary of the navy understands the issue after talking with King and Marshall.

Another telegraph to Short and Kimmel by FDR, listen to Smith and do as he says.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 13, 2017 8:11 pm 
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My plan is for Mr. Smith to be in Admiral Kimmel's office with him early on the morning of December 7th. He will have previously called for a full-scale air raid defense drill to take place, with all ships buttoned up tight, crews at their battle stations, all AA batteries manned and ready (to include ample stocks of ammunition) and three squadrons of P-38s on Alert +5 status..

At approximately 7:00 AM, he will receive word from Opana Point that the party guests from the IJN are inbound and will arrive in 45 minutes. That will be the signal for the alert fighters to get off the ground. As soon as the bombs start falling, that's when the Blackhawks will come into action.

Charles Lindbergh and the others will be on station 35,000' over Pearl Harbor, just waiting for the strike to arrive.

Then, things get interesting...


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:27 am 
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Setting up the Board
Date: November 26th, 1941
Location: the Pacific Ocean, just east of Japan
Time: 8:00 AM

For the previous 60 days, Captain Jay Fletcher and the crew of the Nautilus have been on-station in the Pacific just east of Japan. Their purpose has been to monitor Japan’s naval traffic in anticipation of the Kido Butai task force setting forth for Pearl Harbor. It was noted with interest when the five I-class fleet submarines set out on November 25th, each carrying a midget submarine. When the six carriers left their anchorage in Hitokappu Bay and joined their support ships for the voyage to Hawaiian waters, Captain Fletcher got on the ship’s public-address system and said “attention all hands, this is the Captain speaking. The six Japanese flattops have left their anchorage and are on they way out to sea. From now on, the ship is to be on silent running. That is all.”

Next, Captain Fletcher orders “Helm, come to course 090, make your depth 500'; and match the enemy’s rate of advance.”

The order is instantly acknowledged by being repeated “come to course 090, make my depth 500', match the enemy’s rate of advance. Aye, sir.”

Once his orders have been carried out, Captain Fletcher says “XO, officers call in the wardroom, five minutes.”

“Aye, sir.”

A short time later when all of the Nautilus’ officers have assembled in the ship’s wardroom, Captain Fletcher says “ladies and gentlemen, the Kido Butai Task Force is now on its way to the Hawaiian Islands; the order of battle is as follows.” Captain Fletcher brings up the relevant information on the wardroom’s main screen; the display brings looks of amazement on the assembled officers, because what is represented comprises a very significant fraction of Japan’s surface fleet.

Carriers: Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū, Hiryū, Shōkaku, Zuikaku

Battleships: Hiei, Kirshima

DD Akigumo, DD Urakaze, DD Isokaze, DD Tanikaze, DD Hamakaze, DD Kagero, DD Shiranuhi, DD Arare, DD Kasumi, DD Sazanami, DD Ushio

Cruisers: Tone, Chikuma

AO Kyokuto Maru, AO Kenyo Maru, AO Kokuyo Maru, AO Shinkoku Maru, AO Akebono Maru, AO Tōhō Maru, AO Toei Maru, AO Nippon Maru

“Ladies and gentlemen, as you can see, the IJN has assembled a very large task force. If it were up to me, I’d sink every ship in that fleet and feed their crews to the sharks. As attractive as that idea is, it’s not in the mission plan. Our instructions from Mr. Smith are to follow those ships and let the attack happen. His Saberjet squadron will be waiting to bounce the the IJN aircraft as soon as the bombs start falling.”

Upon hearing this, the XO speaks up and says “sir, what’s our role after the attack happens? Surely, we aren’t going to stand by and do nothing... “

“Far from it. Once the mangled remains of the sir strike come back aboard the Japanese flattops, we’re going to tail the task force all the way back to Japan. When the ships are 75 nautical miles from their home port, we’re going to bust the carriers right in the screws with our supercavitating torpedoes. Each carrier has four shafts, and I plan to use two weapons on each carrier; for a total of twelve. The idea is not to sink them, but to warp the propellor shafts, blow the seals on the skegs and let water into the engineering spaces. The IJN will have to expend precious resources in getting the carriers back to port and repaired; resources that could have been employed elsewhere.”

“I understand, sir. You can count on us to do whatever is necessary.”

“Thank you, XO.”

Date: December 3rd, 1941
Location: Niihau Station
Time: 9:00 AM

The Japanese carriers are now only four days away from being in a position to launch their strike against Pearl Harbor. At Niihau Station, things are getting into high gear in anticipation of that day. Charles Lindbergh and the Blackhawk Squadron arrived some days ago, and since then, have been occupied in getting the jets into service, conducting squadron maneuvers and practicing their gunnery skills.

At 9:00 AM on the morning of December 3rd, Mr. Smith and Joanne Faulkner make the jump to Niihau Station from Los Angeles. They materialize in a section of the base that is off-limits to anyone not in the Organization. As it so happens, Charles Lindbergh and the other pilots are airborne and not available to greet them. The two of them proceed to the base operations building; along the way, Faulkner remarks “Jim, this is the first time I’ve ever been here. It seems to me that you’ve got an overabundance of dock space. Why is that?”

“For one thing, the submarine pen for the Nautilus is dug into the side of Niihau’s main (and extinct, of course) volcano. The entrance is under water, because I want to minimize the sub’s exposure in coming and going. As for the empty dock space, I wanted to have enough room to moor KM Bismarck and IJN Yamato because I had an idea to have them hijacked and brought back here. Unfortunately, circumstances prevented me from carrying out those two little jobs.”

“I see. What’s the plan for tomorrow?”

“We’re going to fly to John Rodgers Airport in Honolulu aboard a Hercules cargo plane that I had delivered out here and configured for use as an executive transport. The Midnight Ghost is aboard, and will be our transportation while we’re on Oahu. After landing, we’ll drive to Pearl Harbor and meet with Admiral Kimmel and General Short. My cover is that I’m here at the behest of President Roosevelt to conduct a thorough review of Pearl Harbor’s defense posture and its readiness for war. We’ll be there for the next three days, and be on hand when the Japanese carry out their attack.”

While Mr. Smith later confers with the base operations staff, Lindbergh and the rest of the Blackhawks come back from their training mission. Faulkner and May Day share an enthusiastic embrace because they have been apart for a long time; then Smith and Colonel Lindbergh shake hands. He says “Mr. Smith. The other pilots and I are as ready as we’re ever going to be. When do we go into action?”

“Colonel, I’m going to let you in on a little secret. In four days, the Imperial Japanese Navy is going to attack the naval base at Pearl Harbor with a massive airstrike. You and the other pilots of Blackhawk Squadron are going to be flying high overhead, just waiting for the Japs to arrive. As soon as the bombs and torpedoes start falling, that’s when you and the squadron are going to attack. The Saberjets are 400+ mph faster than the Nakajima B5N torpedo bomber & Aichi D3A carrier bomber, and 340 mph faster than the Mitsubishi A6M fighter; so, you’ll be able to chew through the opposition as if they were of no more substance than a wet paper bag.”

The normally-unflappable Lindbergh is taken by surprise when Mr. Smith reveals this information. When he recovers his composure, he asks “are you quite sure of that?”

“Colonel, I have never been more sure of anything else in my entire life. My intelligence network spans the globe, and you can take it from me with absolute certainty that nothing of any importance remains unknown to me. Ever since 1928, all of my efforts and those of my staff have been for the single purpose of building the infrastructure necessary to support the United States in the coming war. You, Amelia Earhart and the other pilots are a critically-important part of my plans, so I’m depending on the Blackhawks to defend Pearl Harbor; this is your highest priority. All other concerns are secondary. Do you understand?”

“Completely, Mr. Smith. I and the other pilots will make those Jap bastards sorry they ever left home.”

“That’s just what I wanted to hear, Colonel. After the attack has been torn to shreds, you and the other Blackhawks will be even more famous than yourself were after your flight across the Atlantic back in 1927.”

Date: December 4th, 1941
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Time: 8:30 AM

The distance between Niihau Station and Honolulu is 143 air miles, so the flight of Mr. Smith’s Hercules transport aircraft takes just 30 minutes. The plane touches down at John Rodgers Airport at 8:30 AM and taxiis to a stop near the terminal. No one there has ever seen an aircraft that looks anything like this, so it naturally attracts a great deal of attention from people at the airport. Mr. Smith anticipated this, so he brought along a security contingent of six from Niihau Station. As soon as the plane comes to a stop, the rear cargo ramp is lowered and Mr. Smith’s Duesenberg ‘Midnight Ghost’ is driven off onto the tarmac. The appointment with Admiral Kimmel and General Short is for 9:00 AM, so Joanne Faulkner wastes no time in driving to Pearl Harbor.

As befits the seriousness of the occasion, Mr. Smith is wearing one of his favorite power suits; this one is a silk three-piece midnight-blue pinstripe outfit with a black tie, long-sleeved white silk shirt w/ button-down collar, a gray fedora and black wingtip shoes spit-shined to USMC officers’ specifications. By way of comparison, Joanne Faulkner is wearing a conservatively-styled women’s business suit in slate-gray (also made of silk). Just to err on the side of caution, Smith & Faulkner are wearing their warsuits underneath their outfits and have their machine pistols in shoulder holsters.

The Midnight Ghost is driven up to Pearl Harbor’s main gate, and Mr. Smith introduces himself to the guards on duty by saying “good morning, Gentlemen. I am Mr. James Smith and the lady with me is my executive assistant Joanne Faulkner. I have an appointment at 9:00 AM with Admiral Kimmel and General Short at the base headquarters building.” Having been apprised of Mr. Smith’s arrival, the senior man of the gate guards replies “good morning, Mr. Smith. We were notified of your arrival; do you need directions to base headquarters?”

“No thank you, I am familiar with the layout of the base.”

Smith & Faulkner are admitted to the base and waste no time in driving to the headquarters building, located on North Road near 14th Street. The Midnight Ghost is parked in the visitor’s lot next to the building’s front entrance, then Smith & Faulkner enter the building and introduce themselves to the orderly on duty.

“Good morning. I am Mr. James Smith and the lady with me is my executive assistant; I have an appointment with Admiral Kimmel and General Short.”

“Yes of course, sir; we were told to expect you. If you will both please follow me, I will show you the way to the Admiral’s office.”

“At your convenience, sir.”

Admiral Kimmel’s office is decorated as befits an officer of his rank. The desk is of carved & polished oak, while to the left, there is stand with the flags of the United States and the U.S Navy. To the right, there are the Admiral’s personal colors; a red flag fringed with gold and bearing the device of four white stars, indicating Kimmel’s rank as CINCPAC (Commander-in-Chief Pacific Fleet). Nearby, there is what will be referred to by future officers as the ‘I Love Me’ wall, which displays Kimmel’s various plaques, awards and decorations.

The orderly knocks on the door, snaps to attention, salutes and says “I beg your pardon sir; Mr. James Smith is here to see you.” Admiral Kimmel looks up form his desk where he was just conferring with General Walter Short. He returns the salute and says “very good, lieutenant, You are dismissed.”

“Aye, sir.”

Next, Admiral Kimmel turns and says “ahh, the estimable James Smith. When General Short and I received word that you were coming here on behalf of President Roosevelt, I didn’t quite know what to make of it.”

Mr. Smith shakes hands with both men and replies “indeed sir. The lady with me is my executive assistant Ms. Joanne Faulkner, and you may speak before here as you would to me alone. Now that we have made our introductions, let’s get down to the reason for my visit. President Roosevelt asked me to come to Pearl Harbor because he has concerns that the base’s defense posture isn’t all that it should be. Given what’s happening in the Pacific, I think you’ll agree that this is of singular importance.”

He pauses for a moment, then continues by saying “it has also come to the President’s attention that the working relationship between you two gentlemen isn’t all that it should be. This is, quite frankly, unacceptable. For the sake of the country and the men under your command, I must ask that you settle your differences. If the United States ends up in a shooting war with Japan, the last htign that should be on anyone’s mind is dissension between the two highest-ranking officers in the department of Hawaii.”

Admiral Kimmel stretches out his right hand in a gesture of conciliation and says “Mr. Smith, the disagreements I have with General Short are nothing more that what would normally arise between similar officers in other commands. Neither he or I will let what passes between us cloud our professional judgment.”

“I am pleased to hear that, sir. General Short, let’s begin with you. As you are the senior army officer in the department of Hawaii, I would like to know why the hardened aircraft shelters called for in last year’s budget haven’t been completed yet.” A non-plussed look crosses General Short’s face as he says “Mr. Smith, construction on the shelters intended for Ford Island and Hickam Field began three months ago and will be completed by the end of the year. The shelters at Kaneohe Naval Air Station, Bellows Field, Wheeler Field and Ewa Marine Corps Air Station have been finished for some time now. In the meantime, I have ordered the aircraft parked on Ford Island and at Hickam Field to be parked together to guard against the possibility of sabotage and espionage.”
Upon hearing this, Mr. Smith frowns and says “General Short, that is an ill-advised policy. I will point out that the war games conducted here in 1932 and 1936 highlighted the vulnerabilities of this installation; at no time was sabotage ever a factor. Therefore, I urge you in the strongest possible terms to disperse the aircraft on Ford Island and Hickam Field to be dispersed so that no one bomb can destroy more than one aircraft. As for the other airfields, please order that all aircraft are to be kept in their hardened shelters unless actually getting ready to fly. In regards to espionage, the only Japanese spy in the islands is (or was) a man named Takeo Yoshikawa. This individual came to Hawaii in March of this year and worke dout of the Japanese Embassy under the cover of the post of Vice-Consul. In this capacity, he worked under the name of Tadashi Morimura. Since March up until two weeks ago, Morimura sent regular reports back to the Japanese Foreign Ministry. He is no longer a factor.”

Admiral Kimmel asks “what do you mean, no longer a factor?”

“Sir, Morimura’s last report was sent out two weeks ago, well before you sent the Enterprise out to make finaly deliveries to Wake Island and the Lexington out on maneuvers. Saratoga is on her way to San Diego to embark her air group. In order to maintain his cover and not seem like he was paying too much attention to the goings-on in Pearl Harbor, Morimura went on a visit to the crater of Kilauea; it so happened that Madam Pele took offense to Morimura’s presence on her sacred ground and there was an accident where a portion of the crater rim collapsed and down he went; rather unfortunate, I’d say....” Mr. Smith’s last words are accompanied by a slight grin, as if he knows more than he’s telling.”

“Indeed, sir.” Next, General Short replies to Mr. Smith’s requests and says “I’ll see what I can do, though I think you’re suffering from an overabundance of caution.”

“Think what you want, sir. I will remind you that I have the full backing of President Roosevelt, Secretary Stimson and Secretary Knox in this. Admiral Kimmel, what is the status of the submarine net at the entrance to the harbor?”

“Mr. Smith, the net is currently down because the base is still operating under peacetime standards.”

“I see. Gentlemen, I am of the opinion that their needs to be a full-scale defense drill; pursuant to the authority vested in me by President Roosevelt and confirmed by the Secretaries of War and the Navy, I so request that such an exercise be conducted on Sunday, December 7th.”

Admiral Kimmel and General Short exchange looks of mutual annoyance, but quickly come to realize that someone with the ear of the President is not to be taken at all likely. To General Short, Mr. Smith says “the Army’s contribution to the drill will be that all 31 anti-aircraft batteries will be manned and ready, with ample stocks of ammunition close to hand. For Island and the other airfields will each have a squadron of fighters on alert +5 status, with the other aircraft on alert +30 status.” Admiral Kimmel speaks up and says “what of the Navy?”

“Sir, the base’s submarine net will be raised and all 5"/38 guns, 40-mm quad mounts and .50-caliber machineguns aboard the ships in the harbor will be manned and ready; all other hands aboard ship to be at their battle stations. The drill will begin Sunday morning at 0600; I will not judge it to be successful unless all preparations are complete by 0720. Today is December 4th, the next two days should be more than sufficient time to get ready for the drill. I an my assistant Ms. Faulkner will be on hand that morning to see how things develop.”

Admiral Kimmel resigns himself to the inevitable and says “veery well, Mr. Smith. In the meantime, is there anything else that you need?”

“Yes sir, there is. I would like for rooms to be arranged in the base’s Distinguished Quarters for myself and Ms. Faulkner. After that, I’d like to tour the base; in particular, I’d like to visit Ford Island and also USS Arizona. I’ve always wanted to see that ship ever since parts of the 1934 James Cagney movie ‘Here Comes the Navy’ were filmed aboard her.”

“Very well, Mr. Smith. My staff will see to your requests. Admiral Kimmel lifts his desk phone and calls for a staff car to take Smith & Faulkner to the base’s DV quarters and, afterwards, to Ford Island and Battleship Row. 15 minutes later, a sedan painted in Navy gray pulls up in front of the headquarters building, with a petty officer as a driver and a Lt (JG) as an escort. A few minutes later, the car drives up to the DV quarters building. Smith & Faulkner check into adjoining rooms, then are driven to the landing from where they will be taken to Ford Island by boat.

In Mr. Smith’s original history, Ford Island and the nearby Battleship Row were primary targets of the airstrikes on December 7th, 1941 (as was Hickam Field). The two airfields suffered critical damage, while losing dozens of the aircraft assigned there. In the here and now, Ford Island is operating normally (without a hint of what’s to come).

Lt (JG) Roger Harris says “Mr. Smith, welcome to Ford Island. Is this your first visit here?”

“Yes, it is. I have never been to Pearl Harbor before; it’s quite a place, what with all the battleships and other vessels lined up in neat, orderly rows.”

‘Too bad the IJN is going to come here and spoil the view, Smith thought…’

“Mr. Smith, in case you weren’t aware, Ford Island is home to 70 aircraft; two squadrons of P-38 fighters, with the balance consisting of seaplanes and reconnaissance aircraft.” Smith replies “Lieutenant, the P-38s are something I know a good deal about. As it so happens, my company manufactures them…” The next hour or so is spent in visiting the airfield and meeting with the personnel assigned there; pilots, ground crew and operations staff. Once the visit is concluded, it’s only a short boat ride to Battleship Row; USS Arizona is moored at the #6 position in line, behind USS Nevada and ahead of USS Tennessee and USS West Virginia. Though somewhat old (having been launched back in June, 1915), the ship is still in good shape (not the shattered wreck that Mr. Smith remembers from his original history). After requesting permission to come aboard from the ship’s officer of the deck, Smith & Faulkner are escorted to the wardroom by Lt. Harris; here, they are to meet with Admiral Isaac Kidd and the ship’s captain Franklin Van Valkenburgh.

While Smith & Faulkner wait for Admiral Kidd and Captain Valkenburgh to arrive, Smith says “Joanne, in our original history, the two men we’ll be talking with died when USS Arizona’s forward magazine blew up during the attack on December 7th. But for my intervention, this still would have happened.”

A few minutes later, Admiral Kidd enters the wardroom, accompanied by Captain Valkenburgh. Smith & Faulkner stand to greet them, then Mr. Smith says “gentlemen, thank you for agreeing to meet with us. Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, Sr; Annapolis Class of 1906, prefers to be called ‘Cap’ because of the name association with the pirate Captain Kidd. Married, spouse’s name is Inez, one son Isaac C. Kidd, Jr; due to graduate from Annapolis and receive his commission as an ensign in just over two weeks. Captain Franklin V. Valkenburgh; Annapolis Class of 1909. Married, spouse’s name is Marguerite, two daughters named Jane and Elizabeth.”

Looks of amazement cross between Admiral Kidd and Captain Valkenburgh as the admiral says “Mr. Smith, you are remarkably well-informed. May I ask who the lady is? It has been quite some time since a woman has come aboard USS Arizona.” Mr. Smith replies “ahh, please forgive me for being so remiss with the introductions. The lady is Ms. Joanne Faulkner; she is my executive assistant and share smy every confidence. In fact, you can speak before her as you would to me alone

“A pleasuer to meet you, Ms. Faulkner; USS Arizona is graced by your presence. Now Mr. Smith,how is ti that you know so much about myself and Captain Valkenburgh?”

”Sir, on certain occasions in the past, I have told such people as the President of the United States, the King of England, the current and previous Prime Ministers of Greta Britain and a number of ambassadors for other countries to the United States that there is no information of any kind that is unavailable to me; call my monologue a minor ‘demonstration’ of my capabilities. You probably want to know why I’m here, so I’ll tell you. Not very long ago, the President asked me to come to Pearl Harbor and make an assessment of the installation’s defense posture. To this end, I have met with Admiral Kimmel and General Short and obtained their cooperation in conducting a full-scale defense drill, to be held early on the morning of December 7th.

“Indeed. I participated in the war games of 1932 and 1936, which showed the vulnerability of this installation to aerial attack.” A broad smile crosses Mr. Smith face as he replies “that is excellent, sir; now we have a common frame of reference.”

The next two hours pass in detailed discussions about the state of affairs in the Pacific and in other parts of the world. Before leaving, Mr. Smith asks “Admiral, I would esteem it a great favor if Ms. Faulkner and I could view USS Arizona’s foredeck from the vantage point of the ship’s bridge.”

Admiral Kidd looks to Captain Valkenburgh, who nods his head by way of reply. Then, he says “ for all you have donefor the U.S Navy in the past, it’s the last we can do for you.”

“Thank you, sir.”

Admiral Kidd and Captain Valkenburgh leave the ship’s wardroom, with Smith & Faulkner following on behind. A few minutes later, they come out onto the bridge. Mr. Smith affects to take in the view of the foredeck, and he says admiringly “you gentlemen have quite a fine ship here.” In his mind however, Smith notes that both officers died on this bridge in the history that was. Their bodies were never found, and their positions on the bridge were inferred form where their Annapolis class rings found; Admiral Kidd’s ring was fused to a bulkhead next to the Bridge’s starboard entryway, while Captain Valkenburgh’s ring was found fused to the floor in the middle of the bridge; thus indicating that both officers died in the performance of their duty and in close proximity to each other.

Finally, the visit to USS Arizona comes to an end. Before leaving the ship, Mr. Smith shakes hands with both officers and says “gentlemen, I and Ms. Faulkner would like to thank you for the courtesy you showed us during our visit to your magnificent ship. Captain Valkenburgh, before we leave, I think congratulations are in order.”

“Congratulations for what, sir?”

“Your tour of duty aboard USS Arizona is almost over. After this, I hear you’re due to take command of one of the Iowa-class super battleships my company built for the Navy. As far as I know, the Secretary of the Navy hasn’t decided on which one, yet...”

“True enough, Mr. Smith. I received a telegram from Admiral Stark informing me of that only last week.” Captain Valkenburgh’s question abiout how Smith came to know this goes unasked and, unanswered...

Opening Moves
Date: December 4th, 1941
Location: eastern Pacific Ocean, north-northwest of the Hawiian Islands
Time: evening

Earlier this morning, the Kido Butai task force crossed the 160th Meridian between the 30th and 40th parallels. If all goes well, the carriers will be in position 230 miles north of Oahu and launch their strike against Pearl Harbor no later than 6:00 AM local time on December 7th. The seas have been somewhat rough of late, but are not expected to interfere with flight operations.

Date: December 7th, 1941
Location: 10 nautical miles from the entrance to Pearl Harbor
Time: 1:00 AM local time

After successfully crossing the Pacific Ocean and entering Hawiian waters, the five I-class Japanese fleet submarines (each carrying a Type A Ko-hyoteki midget submarine) reached their designated launch position just ten miles from the entrance to Pearl Harbor. At 1:00 AM, the pilots of the midget subs were given their final orders and ordered to cast off. This was done with speed, and each of the craft slowly began to make their way to their target. For their pilots, the approach is nerve-wracking.

Game On
Date: December 7th, 1941
Location: Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Time: 3:45 AM

The destroyer USS Ward (DD-139) and the minesweeper USS Condor (AMc-14) are on a precautionary patrol when the Condor’s bridge crew signals USS Ward that a periscope was sighted. Immediately thereafter, the Ward’s captain ordered that a detailed search of the area be undertaken.


Time: 6:00 AM

Mr. Smith & Joanne Faulkner arrive back at CINCPAC’s headquarters at 5:45 AM in order to be on time for the start of the defense exercise; Smith enters the building first, followed close behind by Faulkner, who is carrying what appears to be a large radio on a padded strap over her right shoulder; with her left hand, she’s towing a large, wheeled equipment case. Admiral Kimmel is already here, and General Short joins them just before 6:00 AM.

“Good morning, Admiral. Good morning, General; I trust that you’re both ready to begin the exercise.” While Smith is talking, Faulkner puts the radio on a table near Admiral Kimmel’s desk and simply plunks the equipment case down on the floor. The admiral replies “good morning, Mr. Smith. Per your recommendations, all aircraft out in the open on Ford Island and Hickam Field have been dispersed, while all aircraft at the other bases on Oahu have been moved to their hardened shelters. Additionally, one squadron of fighter aircraft each on Ford Island and the other airfields are standing by on Alert +5 status; all others are on Alert +30 status.”

“Very good, sir. Let’s begin.”

While Mr. Smith looks out through the large window in the admiral’s office and takes in the view of Pearl Harbor as the sky begins to lighten in the east, Admiral Kimmel and General Short beckon to their orderlies, who begin making telephone calls to the various units and ships in and around Pearl Harbor; calls also go to the outlying airfields of Bellows Field, Kaneohe NAS and Wheeler Field. All over the base, vehicles are moving and men are heading to their duty stations. Off in the distance, Mr. Smith hears the familiar tones of the bugle call ‘To Arms’. Each of the land-based anti-aircraft batteries is rapidly becoming manned & ready, with ample supplies of ammunition stored in their magazines and ready racks. Aboard the ships in the harbor, warning klaxons sound loudly and the call comes over each ship’s public-address system “General Quarters, General Quarters. All hands man your battle stations.” For each and every ship, the deck hatches are dogged down tight, as are the doors in the watertight bulkheads between compartments. Also, the crews for every 5”/38 and 40-mm mount are at their duty stations, as are the damage control parties.

Time: 6:30 AM

While the defense drill in Pearl Harbor is getting into full swing, the bridge lookouts on USS Ward catch sight of a persicope trailing the supply ship USS Antares (AG-10) as she made her way towards Pearl Harbor. Her commanding officer LCDR William C, Outerbridge excercised his command judgment and ordered that his forward 4" gun mount open fire. The conning tower was directly hit by Ward’s second shot, and this action was followed up with a string of depth charges. Though LCDR Outerbridge and his crew didn’t know it at the time, they had just fired the first shots by the U.S Navy in World War II. The sole casualty of this action was the Type A’s pilot Kazuo Sakamaki, who went down with his ship, No. 19. Later reviews of the role that the Type A midget submarines played in the attack will show that none of the others managed to enter Pearl Harbor; two of them (No. 16 and No. 22) got hung up in the submarine net and were subsequently sunk, while No. 20 ran aground on the beach east of Oahu. In this instance, the pilot had been overcome and killed by chlorine gas leaking from the submarine’s battery pack. The final midget submarine (No. 18) was sunk by depth charges fired from USS Monaghan (DD-354) in 1,300' of water, five miles from the entrance to Pearl Harbor.

Time: 7:20 AM

Admiral Kimmel, General Short, Mr. Smith and Joanne Faulkner are observing the proceedings in Pearl Harbor through the big window in CINCPAC’s office. Through sheer bureaucratic inertia, the message from USS Ward about its action against an enemy submarine was not received in time to make any difference. Just as the defense exercis is about to conclude, Mr. Smith’s portable communications terminal crackles to life and says “SMITH-ACTUAL, OPANA POINT HERE.”

To looks of great surprise on the faces of Admiral Kimmel and General Short, Mr. Smith replies “Opana Point; Smith Actual. Go ahead.”

“BE ADVISED THAT YOUR PARTY GUESTS ARE INBOUND. WE TOOK THE FEED FROM KAWAILOA, THEN THE TRACK WAS HANDED OFF TO KAAAWA. ESTIMATE TIME OF ARRIVAL YOUR LOCATION 20 MINUTES...OVER.”

“Opana Point, Smith-Actual; received and understood. Continue to monitor the situation and advise as necessary. Out.”

General Short is the first to speak as he says “just what the hell was all that about, Smith? Is this some kind of sick joke?”

“No sir, this is no laughing matter. A large formation of Japanese aircraft is on its way here right goddamnmed now, and they’re going to do their damnedest to blow Pearl Harbor into next week. Admiral Kimmel, by the authority vested in me by the President of the United States, I hearby request that you and General Short place all of the forces under your command on full combat alert. Get those Alert +5 fighters up into the air and perhaps they can slow the Japanese aircraft down until there is sufficient time to mount a proper defense.”

Five minutes later, four squadrons (one each from Ford Island, Wheeler Field, Ewa MCAS and Bellows Field) of P-38 fighters are rapidly clawing their way aloft and seeking to find the direction from which the Japanese aircraft are coming. Original plans for the deployment of the P-38 to Pearl Harbor and its environs called for the P-36 Hawks and the P-40 Warhawks to be replaced on a 1:1 basis. However, due to tight-fisted finances forced by Congress on the USAAF, only one squadron of P-38s is in place at each of the airfields on Oahu at the present time.

Battle begins above Wheeler Field with 18 pilots from the 15th Pursuit Group getting into a wild furball with large numbers of Mitsubishi A6M fighters. While 36 of the A6M’s kept the P-38s from the 15th Pursuit Group busy, the other nine continued along with the Nakajima B5N level bombers and Aichi D3A dive bombers with their run to Pearl Harbor. On the eastern coast of Oahu, Kaneohe NAS was heavily attacked. Of the 36 Flying Boats stationed here, the only ones to survive were nine such aircraft in hardened shelters. While Kaneohe was being attacked, Bellows Field came under strafing and bombing attacks. No fighters are present at Bellows, only observation and training aircraft used in monitoring Infantry exercises, bombing exercises by USAAF & USN aircraft and aerial gunnery training by transitioning fighter pilots. Despite the intensity of the attack only three pilots were lost; these men tried to get their P-40 Warhawks airborne, but were subsequently shot down. On the ground, the casualties were just six wounded members of the field’s ground crews.

After blowing through the opposition above Wheeler Field (where the casualties were 33 killed and 75 wounded), the remaining six A6M’s rejoined the B5Ns and D3As heading towards Pearl Harbor; Total Japanese aerial casualties thus far are thirty A6Ms. For the USAAF and the USN, eight P-38 and three P-40 fighters have been shot down, along with 27 Flying Boats destroyed on the ground.

The Japanese air armada still numbers an amazing 198 Nakajima B5Ns, 135 Aichi D3As and 51 Mitsubishi A6Ms. This combined force comes down like the wrath of the storm god Raijin, only to be met by spirited resistance from the anti-aircraft batteries around Pearl Harbor, anti-aircraft gunfire from the ships at anchor and near-maniacal attacks from the P-38 squadrons out of Ford Island and the other three air bases. Still, the old saying that ‘Quantity has a quality all its own’ was never more true than here. Despite determined opposition from USAAF and USN pilots, the bombs and torpedoes begin to fall.

The first vessel of subtance to be hit was the ex-USS Utah (formerly a battleship and now a disarmed target ship), which took two torpedoes amidships and capsized with the loss of 24 of her crew. Next, the light cruiser USS Helena was torpedoed and sunk, while the concussion from this blast caused the nearby minelayer USS Oglala to capsize; two destroyers (USS Cassin and USS Downes) took several bomb hits each and were later declared to be total losses.

The vessels moored along Battleship Row are now coming under attack. The battleships USS West Virginia, USS California, USS Tenneesee and USS Maryland each took two bombs, while USS Pennsylvania (Admiral Kimmel’s flagship) took one bomb amidships. Just when it seems that things can’t get anymore confusing, Charles Lindbergh and the rest of the Blackhawks come screaming down out of the sky like demons from hell bent on a mission of vengeance. At 7:55 AM, ten Nakajima B5N torpedo bombers (five each from the carriers Kaga and Hiryū) went after USS Arizona and were subsequently chewed to pieces by Saberjets from Lindbergh’s flight. In this engagement, seven 1,757-lb armor-piercing bombs were dropped by the B5Ns against the ship. Of these, there were four near misses and three hits. The first hit took out the port-side rear 5" ainti-aircraft gun and the second hit struck portside abreats of the mainmast and exploded in one of USS Arizona’s anti-torpedo bulges. The third hit mght have proved disastrous had it been delivered where it was supposed to be; in this case, a two-second burst of 23-mm cannon fire from one of the Blackhawks chewed off the tail of the B5N that was carrying the bomb and caused the weapon to fall short. Instead of hitting the armored deck portside next to Turret II, the bomb hit the turret’s front glacis and detonated there.

The vessels along Battleship Row also had their fair share of attention from Japanese torpedoes. USS Nevada had already taken a hit amindships and was on fire when her crew managed to rasie steam and try to get the ship out of port. Seeing this, the gallant vessel was bracketed by a dozen 250-lb bombs and suffered five more hits. This damage caused her commandin gofficer to order the ship beached so as not to block the entrance to the harbor. After the two bombs hit USS California, she was struck once more by a single torpedo. If the crew hand’t been ordered to abandon ship, they might have kept her afloat as they had just gotten power to the ship’s firefighting pumps.

USS West Virginia took three torpedoes to her port side, one of which completely blew off the ship’s rudder. Lastly, Amelia Earhart and May Day acted to save the USS Oklahoma by shooting down five of the seven B5Ns that went after the ship with their torpeodes. The ship was subsequently hit twice, after which she settled to the bottom of the harbor (but did not capsize).

In one of the twists that so often decides the course upon which history will turn, two flights of Mitsubishi A6Ms and one of Nakajima B5Ns became disoriented by the intense AA fire from all around Pearl Harbor and by the furious attacks from USAAF P-38 fighters. Instead of targeting Ford Island, the B5Ns dropped their payloads on the oil storage tanks to the east of where the CINCPAC Headquarters building is located; one flight of A6Ms dropped their 132-lb bombs on the tanks south of where USS Pennsylvania had bene moored, whtil the second flight put their ordnance squarely on top of the fuel storage tanks at Hickam Field.

Admiral Kimmel and General Short are striving mightily at CINCPAC headquarters in order to coordinate the defense of Pearl Harbor. Kimmel steps to the window in order to get a better view of the harbor; just as he does, an unearthly roar is heard passing directly overhead. Looking out the window, Kimmel sees a strange aircraft flying towards Ford Island chasing a Japanese bomber.

“What is the name of Godalmighty was that thing? More Japanese trickery, I’ll wager?’

An enormous grin crosses Mr. Smith’s face as he replies “sir, if I were to take that bet, you would lose...”

“What do you mean, Smith?”

“Admiral, I mean that the aircraft you saw is one of mine. To be specific, one of a squadron of 18 jet fighters.”

Admiral Kimmel frowns and says “impossible, there’s no such thing as a jet fighter.”

“Oh, but there is. You see, four years ago, Charles Lindbergh and I embarked upon a research & development project concerning the future of aircraft technology. We both realized that propeller-driven aircraft have had their day and that the future of aircraft propulsion is the jet engine. This project resulted in the construction of an aircraft I call the ‘Saberjet’. Each of the 18 examples flying over Pearl Harbor is a hand-built prototype that cost five million dollars to build.”

“Amazing. I think that.....”

Just then, there is a tinkling sound as the window overlooking the harbor shatters. An errant 7.7-mm bullet fired by an A6M fighter crossed the harbor and went through the window in Admiral Kimmel’s office. If the admiral were standing only six inches to the right of where he was, all would have been well. Instead, the bullet struck Kimmel on the left side of his chest; it pierced the left lung, went straight through the heart and exited his torso under the right arm. Admiral Kimmel collapsed and was dead before he hit the floor. Mr. Smith immediately shouts out ‘MEDIC!!”, but to no avail.

“General Short, until Admiral Kimmel’s executive officer gets here, I think that you are in charge.”

“I think you’re right, Smith.

At almost the very same time over in Washington, D.C, the first confused reports are starting to come in on what happened. In the White House, the reports are immediately passed to President Roosevelt. As soon as he reads them, FDR calls out to his military aide and says “Get a message to Mr. Smith in Hawaii and tell him that I want to see him here as soon as possible.”

“Yes sir, Mr. President.”

So ends the attack on Pearl Harbor. This battle is full of stories of heroism and monumental feats of arms. For example, 1LT Kenneth M. Taylor and his close friend 1LT George Welch had been at a gathering at the Wheeler Field officer’s club the night before. They were on the way back to their quarters when the air raid began. Seizing the initiative, Taylor & Welch drove to the Haleiwa auxiliary airfield and climbed into their P-38 fighters (which were part of the Alert +30 contingent. Swiftly climbing to altitude, the two pilots saw a flight of 12 Aichi D3A bombers which were strafing Ewa Field after expending their bombloads over Pearl Harbor. Taylor & Welch immediately attacked and in the engagement, managed to shoot down all twelve Japanese aircraft. A later after-action review credited Taylor with downing seven D3As, while Welch got five.

In Pearl Harbor proper, the situation facing the battleship USS West Virginia was dire indeed. She had been hit by two armor-piercing bombs and three torpedoes, and only quick action by her crew in counter-flooding certain compartments kept the ship from capsizing. Aboard ship, Captain Mervyn Bennion was critically wounded by shrapnel from one of the bombs, which happened to hit forward and below the bridge. SC3 Doris Miller (who had previously awoken at 6:00 AM to begin his duty day) was summoned by the ship’s communications officer LCDR Doir Johnson in order to help get Captain Bennion. Subsequently, LCDR Johnson was hit and wounded by a bullet fired form a Japanese aircraft. Alone, unaided and under heavy enemy fire, Miller managed to get his commanding officer to an aid station, then he noticed an unmanned twin .50-caliber mount aft of the ship’s conning tower. Seizing the initiative, Miller immediately opened fire on the aircraft attacking his ship. His first kill was the plane which dropped the first torpedo against USS West Virginia; later investigation showed that this aircraft had been piloted by LCDR Shigeharu Murata (from the carrier Akagi. Miller stayed on his guns and reloaded them without assistance; he eventually accounted for another four enemy aircraft, for a total of five.

The Blackhawk Squadron led by Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart compiled a combat record over Pearl Harbor that was, in a word, unequaled. Lindbergh himself shot down 18 enemy aircraft, while Amelia Earhart shot down 15, Other notable pilots are Fritz Beckhardt (with 13 kills), May Day & Jacqueline Cochran (who bagged 12 aircraft each).

Rather than being a brilliant tactical success for the IJN, the attack on Pearl Harbor was an unmitigated disaster. Of the 414 aircraft involved, 352 were shot down; for an amazing loss rate of 85%. Of these 352, 90 were downed by USAAF pilots and 62 by ground and ship-based AA fire. All of the remaining 200 were downed by the Blackhawks.

When the surviving Japanese aircraft came back aboard their carriers later that day, the true magnitude of what had unfolded began to dawn on the Japanese naval staff. Even so, plans still went ahead for the attacks on Wake Island, the Philippine Islands, Guam, Malaya, Singapore and Hong Kong.


Last edited by Garrity on Sat Aug 26, 2017 3:53 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:03 am 
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Excellent work. Have it turned into US curb stomping with light US loses would have been unrealistic. This made sense.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Mon Aug 21, 2017 10:25 am 
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jemhouston wrote:
Excellent work. Have it turned into US curb stomping with light US loses would have been unrealistic. This made sense.


Exactly. That bit with Admiral Kimmel almost happened IRL. He was standing at the window in his office overlooking the harbor when a bullet broke the glass and struck him. All he got was a minor bruise and a ripped uniform jacket. The quote in Tora! Tora! Tora! is exactly what Kimmel said:

"It would have been merciful if it had killed me."

Considering this, it only seemed natural to write that Kimmel bough the farm.

In the chaos and uncertainty of battle, it also seemed logical to accidentally go after the fuel tanks; which would have been the objective of the third strike (had there ever been one). Methinks there are going to be some brown trousers at IJN headquarters after this...

The kill totals for the Blackhawks aren't that unrealistic. The record for kills by one pilot in a single engagement is nine. Besides, there is the qualitative difference between a Saberjet and an A6M to be considered.

Doris Miller, Taylor and Welch are going to get The Medal; so will more than a few others...

Mr. Smith isn't quite done with Kido Butai just yet.... :twisted:


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:27 pm 
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What happens when word gets out Mr. Smith knew about the attack a few days before it happened and didn't tell the military until the strike was inbound?

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:36 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
What happens when word gets out Mr. Smith knew about the attack a few days before it happened and didn't tell the military until the strike was inbound?

The U.S Government knew that an attack was coming IRL, just not exactly when or where. It was only their fumble-fingered asshattery that prevented Pearl Harbor from being prepared in the first place.

If Mr. Smith told FDR that Pearl Harbor was going to be attacked at such & such a date and such & such a time, he would have been laughed out of the Oval Office.

No one BUT no one is going to laugh at him now, methinks...


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:29 pm 
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If Mr. Smith ever thinks about hanging up his Time Lord cleats and retiring, the following will be his swan song:

(adapted from the theme song sung by Nancy Wilson for the 1977 film 'The Last Dinosaur'):

No one has ever done what he has done,
or even dreamed what he has dreamed.
His time has passed, there are no more,
Smith is the Last Dinosaur

No man has ever tried what he has tried,
Most men have failed where he’s prevailed.
His time has passed, there are no more,
Smith is the Last Dinosaur

The world holds nothing new in store for him,
and things that startle you and me are just a bore for him.
The spark of life has gone, his life grows dim
Can there be something left in the world to challenge him?

No man has ever lived as he has lived,
or even walked where he has walked.
His time has passed, there are no more,
Smith is the Last Dinosaur

Smith is the Last Dinosaur........


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 7:59 pm 
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Strategic Readjustment
Date: December 7th, 1941
Location: the Central Pacific, 200 miles north of the Island of Oahu
Time:

As the mangled remains of the squadrons involved in the strike on Pearl Harbor start to come back aboard the carriers from which they were launched, the full impact of the disaster begins to unfold with all the suddenness of a lightning bolt striking just ten feet away from where someone is standing. Of even more importance than the hundreds of front-line aircraft which were shot down over Pearl Harbor is the loss of hundreds of trained and experienced pilots (none of who were more important than Cmdr Mitsuo Fuchida and Lt-Cmdr Shigekazu Shimazaki). As senior officer of the task force, it falls to VADMl Chūichi Nagumo to send a report detailing what happened to Admiral Yamamoto, Commander-in-Chief of the Combined Fleet at the headquarters on the Naval General Staff in Tokyo.

A copy of the report is sent to the office of Prime Minister Hideki Tojo and, as soon as he reads it, he immediately calls for an emergency meeting of the cabinet. Included in the meeting will be the ministers of the Army and the Navy, along with some of the IJN’s command staff (including Admiral Yamamoto himself). The main topic of discussion will be how to proceed in the wake of this unmitigated disaster.

Shortly after the planes have returned to their carriers, Japanese forces elsewhere in the Pacific Theater of Operations carry out their planned attacks against the Philippines, Hong Kong, Singapore and Malaya. The intended attack on Wake Island will be carried out once the Kido Butai task force passes back through the area on its way home and detaches the battleships Hiei & Kirishima and the cruisers Tone & Chikuma; these ships will join those already deployed for the operation against Wake Island.

Date: December 8th, 1941
Location: Wake Island
Time: noon

Four hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the garrison on Wake Island saw its first action. 36 Mitsubishi G3M3 medium bombers from a Japanese airbase in the Marshall Islands conducted an air raid in hopes of catching whatever American aircraft were on Wake Island by surprise; this action taking place on December 8th because Wake is on the other side of the International Date Line. Unfortunately for the Japanese pilots, the surprise was on them. Major Paul Putnam and Captain Henry Elrod had the Island’s entire complement of 24 P-38 fighters aloft on patrol. Major Putnam had 12 P-38s under his command, while Captain Elrod had the other 12. As soon as the Japanese formation was spotted, it was attacked from two different directions at once. In the ensuing aerial melee, all of the G3M3's were shot down; for the cost of just four hardened aircraft shelters damaged on the ground.

Fortunately for the Pan Am employees and the other civilians still on the island, a Martin 130 flying boat that happened to be in Wake Island’s lagoon during the raid survived unscathed. Cmdr. Winfield S. Cunningham (overall commanding officer on Wake Island) ordered that the aircraft take aboard all Pan Am employees, as well as the 45 Chamorro men employed as ground crew at Pan Am’s seaplane terminal; the two pilots objected to the presence of the Chamorros, but Cmdr. Cunningham made his point with the business end of his Smith .45-acp automatic pistol. Though dangerously overloaded, the aircraft did manage to take off safely and head for the Hawaiian islands.

Date: December 7th, 1941
Location: Washington, D.C.
Time: 7:30 PM Eastern Standard Time

As reports on the situation in Pearl Harbor start to filter in, there is an uproar in the halls of Congress. News of the attack was first announced over the radio two hours after the attack was over. Then, it was trumpeted all across the United States in banner headlines on the front pages of evening newspapers both great and small. In the White House, President Roosevelt calls an emergency meeting of his cabinet in order to decide what to do next. Among those in attendance with be the Secretaries of State, War and the Navy. Once the meeting is called to order, President Roosevelt gestures forth and says “Secretary Knox, what is the present situation at Pearl Harbor?” Knox replies “Mr. President, fellow cabinet members, aside from those ships which were sunk or damaged in the attack, some 90 aircraft were either destroyed on the ground or lost in aerial combat. It could have been far worse, however...”

“What do you mean?”

“Sir, do please recall that you sent Mr. Smith out to Pearl Harbor so that he could conduct a thorough review of the base’s defense posture. He spent several days looking around and, as he wasn’t satisfied with what he saw, Smith requested that Admiral Kimmel and General Short conduct a full-scale defense drill. The drill began early this morning, and was completed by 7:20 AM local time in Hawaii. Just then, Mr. Smith received a transmission on his portable radio receiver, warning that his radar stations on Oahu’s northern and eastern coast had detected a huge number of aircraft in-bound towards Pearl Harbor and other bases on the island of Oahu. Immediately after hearing this, Mr. Smith exercised the authority you gave him and requested that Admiral Kimmel and General Short bring the troops under their command to full combat alert. Thanks to the preparations for the drill, this was accomplished very easily.”

“Indeed. How large was the force sent against Pearl Harbor by the Japanese?”

“Absolutely enormous, Mr. President; more than 400 aircraft, consisting of level bombers, dive bombers and fighters. The alert aircraft got aloft and disrupted the attack, thus giving General Short’s anti-aircraft batteries (and those aboard ship in the harbor) the time they needed to get into action.”

“How much damage did we manage to do to the attacking aircraft?”

“Mr. President, USAAF fighters accounted for 62 enemy aircraft shot down, while shore-based and ship-based anti-aircraft fire downed another 90. The increase in AA performance is directly-attributable to the new proximity fuzes. Even so, the Japanese aircraft would have overwhelmed Pearl Harbor’s defenses had not Mr. Smith’s squadron of experimental jet aircraft not intervened when they did. “

President Roosevelt looks to Secretary Stimson and says “Mr. Secretary, what information do you have on these aircraft?”

“Sir, Mr. Smith told General Short that those planes are all experimental hand-built prototypes that had been under development for the last three years. General Short’s anti-aircraft officers said that Smith’s aircraft were flying so fast that neither their guns or those aboard ship could track them. In any case, the squadron came screaming down from on high and fell upon the attacking Japanese aircraft like the Wrath of Almighty God. The unit is lead by none other than Charles Lindbergh, with Amelia Earhart as his second-in-command. It has equal numbers of both men and women in its ranks; among the female pilots are Jacqueline Cochran and May Day. The most interesting thing about the squadron are some of the other pilots...”

Secretary of State Cordell Hull interjects and says “what do you mean, Secretary Stimson?”

“One of Smith’s other pilots is the World War German flying ace Fritz Beckhardt. He flew in the same squadron as Hermann Goering and accounted for 17 kills in aerial combat. Beckhardt is Jewish and for that, his combat record was expunged when the Nazis came to power in 1933. Somehow, Mr. Smith managed to get Beckhardt and his family out of Germany and into the United States.”

At this, President Roosevelt says “Secretary Stimson, the expression on your face says to me that there’s something else, isn’t there?”

“You are correct, sir; there certainly is. Perhaps the ost amazing thing about Smith’s pilots is that two of them are of Japanese ancestry; Fred Kawamoto and Jean Nishimura, to be specific. They and the rest of the squadron acquitted themselves extraordinarily well. Out of a total of 414 attacking enemy aircraft, USAAF fighters and the combined anti-aircraft fire form the Army and the Navy knocked down 152 of them. Mr. Smith’s squadron shot down two hundred of the rest in the space of just 90 minutes.”

When these numbers were announced, a hushed undercurrent of amazement ran around the conference table. President Roosevelt leans forward in his chair and says “Secretary Knox, I want you to send a message to Mr. Smith recalling him to Washington, D.C. immediately; Charles Lindbergh and the other pilots are to come along as well; tell Smith I want him here as soon as possible. I think he’s got some explaining to do.”

“Yes, Mr. President. I’ll send the message as soon as I return to my office.”

After more discussions, the meeting adjourns and the participants go their separate ways. Once everyone is gone, President Roosevelt calls for his private secretary and says “Marguerite, please call Speaker Rayburn and President pro tem Glass. Tell them that I request that a joint session of Congress be held tomorrow. I will be attending the session in person, where I will address Congress and the nation.”

“Yes, Mr. President.”

Ms. Lehand leaves to carry out her instructions, then FDR takes out a pad of paper from his desk and begins to write the address he will deliver to Congress. Early the next morning, President Roosevelt rises so that he can complete the address before being driven to Capitol Hill.

Cry Havoc and let slip the Dogs of War
Date: December 8th, 1941
Location: Capitol Building, Washington, D.C.
Time: 11:30 AM

At 11:15 AM, President Roosevelt arrives at the Capitol and is escorted to the House Chamber by his son James. He is assisted to the podium, accompanied by thunderous cheers and applause. Given this historic nature of what is about to happen, the visitor’s gallery is full to capacity with invited guests and members of the Washington, D.C. press corps. The session is presided over by Vice-President Truman and Speaker Rayburn; as soon as applause from Congress and the public dies down, FDR takes a folded sheet of paper out of his coat pocket, places it on the lectern and begins to read:

‘Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Members of the Senate and House of Representatives. Yesterday, December 7th, 1941, a date which will live in infamy. The United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan....”

The speech takes barely seven minutes to deliver (pausing only for spontaneous outbursts of applause), and was carried live over the radio. Media analysts will later estimate that 85% of all American households tuning in to listen to the broadcast. The speech could have been longer, but Roosevelt decided to keep it short and to the point so that it would have more of a dramatic effect. It certainly did because, within the hour, FDR’s declaration of war passed the Senate by a unanimous vote of 82-0; in the House of Representatives, the margin was 388-1. The sole dissenting vote was cast by Jeanette Rankin, Representative from the State of Montana. Rankin’s action was so reviled that she had to take refuge in a telephone booth from an angry mob; The U.S Capitol Police had to be called upon to rescue her. Two days later, when Congress declared war on Germany and Italy, Rankin abstained.

Date: December 8th-December 10th, 1941
Location: various

Japanses forces carried out near-simultaneous attacks on British Malaya, Singapore, Hong Kong and the Shanghai International Settlement. Great Britain declared war on Japan some nine hours before President Roosevelt delivered his speech, in keeping with Prime Minister Churchill’s intention to declare war on Japan within hours of an attck by Japan on the United States.

Early on the morning of December 9th, Imperial Japan began its occupation of the Philippine Islands with a series of landings on Luzon. These were coupled with air raids against Clark Field that were designed to destroy American air power in the region. The commanding officer of U.S military forces in the Philippines is General Jonathan M. Wainwright, who was appointed to the post after Genearl Macarthur was recalled to the United States. Thanks to Wainwright’s foresight, hardened aircraft shelters had been constructed at Clark Field; thus allowing most of the planes based there to survive the initial assault. In other areas, Mr. Smith’s Philippine Section had previously cooperated with the goverment of President Manuel in the setting up of supply dumps and covert arms caches. These (in conection with near-fanatic resistance from the Philippine Scouts and the Philippine Constabulary) severely hampered LtG Masaharu Homma’s operations. From the beginning, the Japanese faced a very tough time, paying in blood for every foot of their advance.

Operation: Vengeance
Date: December 10th, 1941
Location: Otis Needleman’s office, Chicago Merchandise Mart Building
Time: 10:00 AM

Now that the balloon has finally gone up, the Organization is on a full-time war footing. Otis Needleman now begins to plan an operation in connection with the French section, which will address the Vel d’Hive roundup of French jews. Originally, the roundup took place between July 16th-17th, 1942; now, it never will. Mr. Smith’s response will come in two simultaneous phases; the first phase consisting of the destruction of the records used to facilitate the roundup. These documents are stored in the headquarters of the Commissariat général aux questions juives (CGQJ); a building formerly known as the Banque Léopold Louis Dreyfus.

The second phase involves the termination with extreme prejudice those French police officials who (in the original history) bore primary responsibility for carrying out the roundup. These are:

René Bousquet; Secretary-General of the National Police
Jean Leguay; Bousquet’s deputy
Xavier Vallat; current head of the CGQJ
Louis Darquier de Pellepoix; Vallat’s successor as head of the CGQJ
André Tulard; creator of the CGJQ files, head of the Foreigners & Jewish Affairs Section, Prefecture of Police, Paris.
Jean Francois; Director of the General Police
Emile Hennequin; head of the Paris Police

Otis Needleman gives the French Section the discretion as to which methods are to be used in removing these seven individuals from the land of the living. Each of the seven will be targeted at the same time, so that there will be no possibility of there being advance warning to any of them. Of the seven, Mr. Smith judges that René Bousquet, Jean Leguay and André Tulard are worthy of deaths that will (in the words of the fictional villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld) be particularly unpleasant and humiliating; Bousquet himself will be singled out for special attention because of his telegrams to the Prefects of départements throughout Occupied France ordering them to deport Jewish adults (and children whose expulsion hadn’t even been requested by the Nazis). Just for the sake of completeness, Mr. Smith’s vengeance will also fall upon the headquarters of the Prefecture of Police in Paris, a building located between the Place Louis Lépine and the Quai du Marché neuf on the île de la Cité.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 27, 2017 9:50 pm 
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Smith may have played too good a hand.

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Poohbah wrote:
Smith may have played too good a hand.

Perhaps. We shall see in any case...
One thing's for sure and for certain: FDR's male bovine excrement Executive Order 9066 will never happen...


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Can FDR handle the truth? :lol:

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Joining the party
Date: December 11th, 1941
Location: various
Time: various

Just as it happened in the original history, Nazi Germany declared war on the United States. Hitler’s justification for doing so were the actions involving the destroyer USS Greer in September. In that incident, the ship fired upon the submarine U-652 after first having been fired at. Of course, the German government claimed that their submarine had not fired the first shot and that it had been depth-charged without provocation. Then, there was the incident involving another destroyer, USS Kearny in October. That ship and three others had been on patrol duty in the water off Iceland when a British convoy requested assistance after being attacked by a U-boat wolfpack. In that action, USS Kearny dropped depth charges on the attacking U-boats and was subsequently torpedoed with the loss of 11 hands and the injury to 22 others. Lastly, there was the sinking of the destroyer USS Reuben James by U-552 on October 23rd; here, the German government claimed that USS Reuben James’ activities while escorting Convoy HX-156 made her a legitimate target. Regardless of the circumstances, the declaration of war by Nazi Germany on the United States will later prove to be Hitler’s greatest strategic mistake (equaled only by his invasion of the Soviet Union). Later on in the day, the Italian government reluctantly followed Germany’s lead and likewise declared war on the United States.

Upon hearing this news, Mr. Smith places a call to Oits Needleman and says “Otis, I want you to detail some of your intelligence assets and kepe an eye on the situation in Germany. As soon as we receive word that the Wannsee Conference is being held, I want the villa hit, and hit HARD. Do you understand? Everyone there is complicit in carrying out Hitler’s ‘Final Solution’; in fact, the conference was called by no less a Nazi bigwig than SS-Obergruppenführer Reinhard Heydrich. Its purpose was to coordinate implementation of the ‘Final Solution’ between various departments in the Nazi government. If you’ll please recall, Heydrich was such a loathesome asshole that he earned the nickname of the ‘Hangman’. In our original history, he was wounded in an assassination attempt in Prague, Czechslovakia on May 27th, 1942; eventually dying of his injuries on June 4th. In retaliation, the Nazis massacred the inhabitants of the village of Lidice. Needless to say, the assassination and the massacre aren’t going to happen tis time around. My plan is to have a Ghost Eagle-V UCAV deployed to the area and, at the appropriate time drop a 500-lb DIME bomb on the room in the villa where the conference is taking place. Just for the sake of completeness, the bomb strike will be followed up with a 750-lb thermobaric weapon.”

Otis replies “sounds like a plan, Jim; you’ll get no argument from me on implementing it. After all, knowing that those Nazi assholes are breathing the same air as I am offends my sensibilities; so, anythign I can do to help rid the world of them is fine by me.”

The call ends, and Needleman turns his attention towards how best to do the job. To this end, he accesses Mr. Smith’s database and calls up the pictures of the villa that he and Joanne Faulkner took while on their visit back in 1936. In fact, it was Mr. Smith’s purpose in taking the pictures to aid in just such an attack.


The Battle of Wake Island, Part 1
Date: December 11th, 1941
Location: Wake Island
Time: 11:30 AM local time/7:30 PM Eastern Standard Time

Elsewhere in the Pacific, the action on and around Wake Island is proceeding apace. Between December 9th and December 10th, additional air raids were carried out by the Japanese in order to suppress the Island’s defenders; the raid on the 9th targeted Wake’s defensive artillery positions. Thankfully, no real damage was done because of Cmdr Cunningham’s policy of constantly rotating the guns between various positions, leaving some emplacements vacant and others occupied. The raid on December 10th managed to destroy much of Wake Island’s barracks space, forcing the garrison to sleep in their gun emplacements or other earthen revetments.

Both raids were particularly expensive for the Japanese, as Major Putnam had the P-38s of VMF-211 aloft and waiting on both occasions (thanks to the air-warning radar previously installed on the island). Major Putnam, Captain Elrod and the other pilots managed to down 36 enemy aircraft on these two days, while Wake’s anti-aircraft defenses accounted for another 24. The first serious attempt by the Japanese to force a landing on Wake came today, when part of the IJN’s South Seas Force (three light cruisers, six destroyers, two patrol boats and two transports carrying 450 troops from the Special Naval Landing Force) approached the island.

The defenders held their fire until the invasion fleet was came within 4,000 yards; then, they opened up with everything they had. One of the troop transports was sunk with all hands aboard, as were two of the escorting destroyers. One of the light cruisers was sunk and another heavily-damaged. Additionally, two more destroyers were sunk by airstrikes from VMF-211 (by this time, the squadron had lost six of its aircraft from a combination of heavy AA fire from the Japanese ships and overwhelming numerical superiority by enemy aircraft). Additionally, the PT boat squadron (with LtJG John F. Kennedy as one of its members) got into the action. In a bold move, the boats were divided into two sections and sent to attack the Japanese ships from two different directions at once. As a result, the third light cruiser was sunk (along with two more destroyers). Additionally, the second enemy troop transport was damaged by gunfire from the PT boats. Afterwards, Admiral Sadamichi Kajioka ordered the invasion fleet to withdraw to a safe distance, regroup and wait for reinforcements.

Date: December 16th, 1941
Location: the waters off Wake Island
Time: late afternoon

Admiral Kajioka’s requested reinforcements arrived in the form of two battleships (Hiei & Kirishima), two cruisers (Tone & Chikuma) and four destroyers (Urakaze, Isokaze, Tanikaze and Hamakaze) that were detached from the Kido Butai task force as it passed through the area on its way back to Japan. Due to the heavy casualties that the air wings of the six carriers had taken over Pearl Harbor back on December 7th, Admiral Chūichi Nagumo was unable to comply with Admiral Kajioka’s request for air support. For this, Kajioka had to rely on bombers and fighters from bases in the Marshall Islands. The remaining half of the Naval Special Landing force was reinforced by an additional 1,500 Japanese marines. At a command conference, Admiral Kajioka decided that the best way to proceed was to form a gun line with his cruisers and destroyers, while holding back the two battleships as a gunfire reserve. Then, the marines and the Special Naval Landing Force would be sent forward to land under the cover of a massive barrage of naval gunfire. Unfortunately, things didn’t work out for Admiral Kajioka as planned.

The Battle of Wake Island, Part 2
Date: December 23rd, 1941
Location: Wake Island
Time: 2:30 AM local time

Admiral Kajioka’s plan was put into effect at 2:30 AM this morning. It began with a massive naval bombardment to suppress Wake Island’s defenders, accompanied by supporting aircraft from bases in the Marshall Islands; then, landing craft put off from the surviving troop transport, Patrol Boat #23 and Patrol Boat #33. Under cover of the naval bombardment, the landing craft made for the shore, while the two patrol boats beached themselves in order to draw the enemy’s fire.

Needless to say, Admiral Kajoika’s plan failed miserably. Commander Cunningham ordered his men to hold their fire until the last possible moment; then, when the landing craft were just three hundred from the beach, all hell broke loose. The six 155-mm ‘Long Tom’ artillery pieces opened up, scoring numerous hits on the troop transport and the two patrol boats, Then, the landing craft were targeted by the island’s 40-mm automatic grenade launchers, 60-mm mortars and ‘Mauler’ armored security vehicles. Of the total landing force of 1,800 men, around one-third were killed before they ever stepped foot on the beach. The rest faced withing fire from the island’s entrenched .50-caliber machineguns, .30-caliber machineguns and the two companies of M3 light tanks (firing canister and HE rounds); the carnage was further complemented by 60-mm mortar fire and fire from the Mauler ASVs.

The island’s remaining P-38s (by now reduced in number to twelve) got aloft and into action. Captain Elrod sank the cruiser Tone with a well-placed 500-lb bomb, then went on to shoot down five Japanese fighters (raising his kill total thus far to eight); these actions will later earn him the Medal of Honor. Elsewhere, PT-109 (commanded by Lt(JG) John F. Kennedy and the other boats of the squadron went on the attack. The squadron managed to break through the destroyer screen, but at the cost of six boats sunk with all hands. Kennedy’s boat went after the battleship Hiei and, in a daring approach that brought him astern of the enemy warship, Kennedy launched all four of his Mark 13 torpedoes; two of them hit between the screws and one went off under the ship’s keel just forward of the rudder. By a trick of fate, the last Mark 13 ran a little slow and so, hit the same spot that one of the first two torpedoes did. Instead of detonating on contact with the battleship’s hull, the fourth torpedo actually penetrated inside the ship’s hull and came to rest against the barbette protecting the ammunition for the aft 14" gun turret. The torpedo’s warhead exploded and in so doing, caused the Hiei’s aft 14" magazine to go up; the resulting titanic explosion blew the Hiei completely in half between the #3 and #4 14" turrets. Less than three minutes later, both halves sank beneath the waves (taking some three-quarters of the ship’s crew with them). Kennedy then went after one of the Japanese destroyers; firing all 16 of his 5" Mark 10 rockets and scoring hits with 12 of them. Suffering critical damage to her superstructure, the destroyer had to withdraw. As with Captain Hank Elrod’s activity, Lt(JG) Kennedy’s gallantry and intrepidity in carrying out his attack will also earn him the Medal of Honor.

After another 36 hours of bitter fighting on and around Wake Island, Admiral Kajioka orders a withdrawl. The troops that actually managed to get ashore were unable to make any significant headway against determined resistance by the Americans while at sea, he lost the battleship Hiei, the cruiser Tone, two destroyers sunk and one damaged, plus the two patrol boats. Admiral Kajioka now orders his remaining ships to withdraw out to a distance of ten miles, safely out of range of Wake Island’s guns. His next move will be to plan what to do next as his orders from the Imperial General Staff are most explicit; Wake Island must be taken at all costs.

For the defenders of Wake, their gallant efforts have not been without cost. Of the troops on the island, there have been 49 killed and 51 wounded. Additionally, six PT boats have been lost (with a total of 51 sailors); lastly, twelve P-38s have been downed (with the loss of six pilots killed and six wounded). In a command conference after the Japanese withdrawl, Cmdr Cunningham, Major Deveraux, Captain Putnam and Lt(JG) Kennedy meet to discuss their situation.

“Major Deveraux, what is the status of your ammunition stocks?”

“Sir, my artillery, mortars and machineguns have been spending ammunition like water out of a firehose. If the Japanese come against us again like they did today, we won’t be able to stand them off for very long.”

Next, Cmdr Cunningham turns to Captain Putnam and asks “what’s the status of your fighters?”

“Commander, half of my planes are down; either by being shot down in aerial combat or from damage taken from Japanese ship-based anti-aircraft fire. The ones damaged are repairable, but tht will take some time.”

Lt(JG) Kennedy speaks next and says “Commander Cunningham, I’m the senior surviving officer from the PT boat squadron; I’ve got six boats left and they’re all in good shape.”

“Very well, gentlemen. As I see it, we’ve got three choices; we can fight it out to the last man, surrender or evacuate. I‘ll have the commo section send a message to the Navy Department requesting instructions on how to proceed. For now, return to your posts and tell your men that I say they have performed above and beyond the call of duty. Dismissed.”

After the meeting concludes, George Abel and Rick Leavitt (two of Mr. Smith’s twelve men on Wake Island) come to meet with Commander Cunningham. Mr. Abel says “sir, my people and I stand by to render whatever assistance is necessary. If this is to be our end, then I will have us make such an end as to be worth remembering.”

“Thank you, Mr. Abel. The support that you and your men have given me thus far has been invaluable, and it has been noted for the record.”


Telling it like it is
Date: December 28th, 1941
Location: the White House, Washington, D.C.
Time: 11:30 AM

Three weeks after the events at Pearl Harbor (and just five days after the second phase of the Battle of Wake Island) , Mr. Smith and the pilots of the Blackhawk Squadron arrive at Washington D.C.’s Union Station via his private train. Almost before the train pulls into the station, there is an immense crowd of onlookers already present; among which are news reporters form the major newspapers all throughout the United States. Pausing only to answer a few brief questions, Smith, Lindbergh and the others board three limousines from the Washington, D.C. section and are driven to the White House. As befits the seriousness of the occasion, Mr. Smith and Joanne Faulkner are wearing their favorite power suits, while the Blackhawks are wearing their uniforms (consisting of khaki slacks, flight jackets and polished brown leather boots).

Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner, May Day, Charles Lindbergh, Jacqueline Cochran and Fritz Beckhardt are in the first car, while the others are in the two vehicles following behind. As they drive through the streets of Washington, D.C., Lindbergh turns to Mr. Smith and says “I have to wonder how the President is going to react when he sees us in person.” Smith grins widely as he replies “rather favorably, I suspect. You, Amelia Earhart and the others are some of the best pilots in the country. But for what you and the Blackhawks did at Pearl Harbor, the damage to the Pacific Fleet would have been far worse than it actually was.”

The three limousines now pull up to the east entrance of the White House, then Smith and the others are escorted to a waiting area next to the East Room (which has been temporarily converted for use as a conference room for this occasion). Among those present are President Roosevelt, Secretary Hull, Secretary Stimson, Secretary Knox, General Arnold and a number of other high-ranking military officers. Before Smith, Faulkner and the others arrive, President Roosevelt and his cabinet are discussing the damage cause to Pearl Harbor by the attack.

“Secretary Knox, just what did we loose?”

“Mr. President, in the attack, 90 aircraft were either destroyed on the ground or lost in aerial combat. In addition, the battleship USS West Virginia suffered critical damage from three torpedoes and two armor-piercing bombs, one of the torpedoes blew off her rudder; she’s still afloat, but barely. As regards the other battleships, USS Arizona took three bomb hits and is still afloat. USS Nevada attempted to get under way, but took six bombs and had to be beached in order to keep her from sinking and blocking the channel. USS California was hit by two bombs and a torpedo; she’s sunk but repairable. USS Tennessee and USS Maryland were hit twice each by bombs, but are still afloat.”

“What of the other ships?”

“Sir, the target ship USS Utah took two torpedoes and capsized. The cruiser USS Helena was torpedoed and sunk, while the minelayer USS Oglalla capsized due to the blast from USS Helena. The destroyers USS Cassin and USS Downes are total losses. The most critical loss is to the Pacific Fleet’s fuel supplies; the tank farms were targeted by a flight of fighters and a flight of level bombers. At first glance, it was thought that two-thirds of the fleet’s fuel was lost; that is in error. The actual loss is 75%. Mr. President, until those tank farms can be repaired and the lost fuel replaced, the operations of the Pacific Fleet are going to be severely hampered. There is another matter I’d like to address with you.”

“What is that, Mr . Secretary?”

“Sir, the garrison on Wake Island reports that they have been attacked twice by the Japanese in heavy force. They have managed to fend off both attacks, but are taking damage. Wake’s commanding officer Cmdr Winfield Cunningham reports that the situation is deteriorating rapidly and that he doesn’t know how much longer he can hold out.”

“Thank you, Mr. Secretary.”

Just then, an aide knocks on the door and announces that Mr. Smith, Joanne Faulkner and the pilots of Blackhawk Squadron are here as requested. They are shown into the room and take their seats; Smith & Faulkner are on the opposite side of the table from FDR and his cabinet, while charles Lindbergh and his pilots are seated nearby.

President Roosevelt begins by saying “welcome to the White House, ladies & gentlemen. Mr. Smith, the cabinet and I were just discussing the damage to the fleet at Pearl Harbor. I suppose you can begin by telling us all just how you and those pilots of yours managed to pull that particular rabbit out of your hat...”

“Of course, Mr. President. As early as the Japanese invasion of Manchuria back in 1931, I realized that conflict between the United States and Japan was inevitable. Ever sine that time, all of my efforts have been directed towards a single goal; that of getting the country ready for war. As far as the aircraft are concerned, I invented the technology used in the Saberjets. Lindbergh-Goddard Aerospace spent the last three years developing and refining the design; to include hand-building a prototype squadron of these aircraft, fligh-testing them and training the pilots. Before you ask, half of the squadron’s pilots are men and half are women. May Day, Amelia Earhart and Jacqueline Cochran were natural choices because of their previous experience in my space program. As far as the others are concerned, I brought Fritz Beckhardt on board because of his experience in the German Air Force during the Great War. Mr. Beckhardt, please tell the President how you came to be in my employ...”

“Yawohl, Herr Smith. Herr Praesident, as was just said, I flew for the German Air Force during the late war. I accumulated a total of 17 kills and for my service, I was personally decorated twice by the Kaiser. I am Jewish and for that, my combat record was erased and my awards rescinded when those verdammt Nazis came to power in 1933. I spoke out against what was happening, and I and my family were imprisoned for what I said. Herr Smith’s agents broke my family and I out of prison, then we were brought here to the United States. Thereafter, I was only too happy to join the fighter-jet program at Lindbergh-Goddard Aerospace in New Mexico.”

“Very good, Mr. Beckhardt. Mr. Smith, you have something else to add?”

“Yes sir, Mr. President. I can see by the looks on the faces of some of those in attendance here that they object to the presence of Mr. Kawamoto and Ms. Nishimura. I will tell you all that they are, if anything, just as loyal as any other citizen would be. Indeed, they were specifically chosen to join the Blackhawks because I wanted to show that the racist attitudes directed by certain segments of society towards those of Japanese ancestry in the United States are so much stuff & nonsense. They and the other Blackhawks risked their lives against vastly-superior odds over Pearl Harbor, and performed magnificently. I dare say that what happened was a feat of arms unlike any other throughout the entire history of aviation; therefore, they and the others are worthy of receiving the highest awards this country can bestow.”

President Roosevelt sits back in his chair to consider what he just heard. As he does, General Arnold speaks up and says “Mr. Smith, where did your jets come from? How did you arrange to have them on hand just as the Japanese commenced their attack?”

“Sir, they flew out of my base on the island of Niihau; which my grandfather purchased from King Kamehameha IV for the sum of $25,000 in gold back in 1864. Over the years, I developed the island’s infrastructure and now use it for certain projects that I want kept out of the public eye. As for how the jets were over Pearl Harbor, my radar stations communicated news of the impending attack at 7:20 AM local time. The squadron was alerted immediately and was airborne in less than five minutes. The distance between Niihau and Oahu is just 143 air miles; the speed of my aircraft is such that they covered that distance in 15 minutes. Fortunately, they got there just in time.”

President Roosevelt clears his throat to get everyone’s attention. He says “Mr. Smith, how long will it take for you to get those jet aircraft of yours into front-line service?”

“Mr. President, I anticipated that you would ask that very question of me. To bring the Saberjets into squadron service will take until November, 1944. This time is needed to tool up to produce the aircraft, and to train the pilots once the jets are available.”

“Very well. Earlier, you said that the Blackhawks (as you call them) are worthy of this nation’s highest awards. What precisely did you have in mind?”

“Sir, Charles Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart led the squadron into battle and displayed extraordinary valor and skill while doing so. These qualities, and their record total of 18 victories each, make them worthy of the Medal of Honor; the other pilots should receive the Distinguished Flying Cross. To prove the Blackhawks’ worthiness for these honors, I will furnish copies of gun camera footage from each aircraft; the film is in color and with sound. Secretary Stimson, while we’re on the subject of awards and decorations, I commend to your attention the actions of certain personnel at Pearl Harbor; I am speaking of 1LT Kenneth M. Taylor and 1LT Geroge Welch, USAAF. These two pilots managed to get their aircraft aloft while under extremely heavy enemy fire. During the course of the battle, the two pilots engaged a flight of 12 Aichi D3A bombers; 1LT Taylor shot down seven of them, while 1LT Welch shot down five. Their valor under fire, professional excellence and skill have earned them a nomination for the Medal of Honor; I would regard it favorably if they were to be awarded the Medal. Secretary Knox?”

“Yes, Mr. Smith?”

“I bring to your attention the actions of SC3 Doris Miller aboard the battleship USS West Virginia. That morning, Miller had awoken at 0600 to begin his duty day in the ship’s kitchen. When the attack began, the ship’s commanding officer CPT Mervyn Bennion was gravely wounded by shrapnel from a bomb which struck his ship. SC3 Miller was summoned by the ship’s communications officer LCDR Doir Johnson to help get Captain Bennion to safety. In so doing, LCDR Johnson was hit by machinegun fire from a Japanese aircraft. Alone, unaided and undre heavy fire, SC3 Miller managed to get CPT Bennion to an aid station. Afterwards, he noticed an unmanned twin .50-caliber machinegun mount aft of the ship’s conning tower. Acting in the finest traditions of the Navy, he immediately opened fire on the aircraft attacking his ship; his first kill was the plane that dropped the first torpedo against USS West Virginia. SC3 Miller accounted for a total of five enemy aircraft shot down that day; what makes his achievement all the more amazing was that he stayed on his guns whle coming under heavy enemy fire, even managing to reload them without assistance. I am aware of your personal feelings, and I will be obliged if you will recommend that Miller get the Medal of Honor. Additoonally, I’d like him transferred to the deck division of one of the Iowa-class battleships; perhaps USS Iowa. He’ll serve as an anti-arcraft gunner, and will be treated with respect.”

Secretary Knox starts to rise from his chair, the look on his face betraying resentment at effectively being told what to do by a civilian. President Roosevelt motions Knox back to his seat, accompanied by a glare from Mr. Smith’s face that is of such intensity that it could start a broken clock. Seeking to maintain the peace, Secretary Knox replies “err, I’ll be pleased to look into the matter. If Miller’s actions are as you say, he’ll get the Medal and the transfer you requested.”

“Thank you, Mr. Secretary; that’s all I ask. Mr. Smith turns to President Roosevelt and asks “sir, might I enquire of the situation on Wake Island? I have staff there and I have concerns for their safety...”

“Ahh, yes. Secretary Knox reports that the island’s garrison is holding, but that the commanding officer doesn’t know how much longer he and his men can last.”

“Thank you, Mr. President. I have a suggestion on how to proceed with the situation.”

“Do tell, James. Just what do you have in mind?”

“Please have Secretary Knox issue an order giving Commander Cunningham the discretion to order an evacuation at his discretion. The P-38s on the island can fly to Pearl Harbor by utilizing their external ordnance capacity to fit drop tanks, while the PT boats can set course for Oahu...” Just then, Secretary Knox speaks up and says “Mr. Smith, I see two problems with your idea. First, the PT boats don’t have anywhere near the range to get from Wake Island to Oahu; the second concerns how to evacuate the rest of the Island’s personnel. The PT boats don’t have anywhere near the capacity to carry off everyone on the island.” A piratical grin crosses Mr. Smith’s face as he replies “Mr. Secretary, just leave that to me. If you give the order allowing Cmdr Cunningham to evacuate, I’ll support the operation by arranging to have some of my ships in the area; they can refuel the PT boats and carry off the island’s other personnel to safety.”

President Roosevelt hears Mr. Smith’s proposal and says “isn’t that more than a little bit risky?”

“Sir, considering the alternative, I don’t think that there’s any other choice. Even if Commander Cunningham were to order a surrender, the Japanese consider failure to fight to the end to be a disgraceful act and would treat their prisoners with the utmost barbarity; they would, in all likelihood, kill them all just to avoid having to take care of them. Besides, I’ve got a little surprise package in store for when the Japanese come ashore on Wake Island.”

“Mr. Smith, the look on your face tells me that your surprise will be most unpleasant. Very well then; I have decided. You have never given me of the country reason to doubt you, so I will give the order. Secretary Knox, you will send word to Commander Cunningham to order an evacuation of Wake Island at his discretion.”

“Yes, Mr. President.”

FDR looks again at Mr. Smith and says “James, I’m counting on you to bring this off. If you are successful, I will see to it that you receive the highest awards that the nation can bestow.”

“Thank you, sir. Before I leave, would I be correct in assuming that a retaliatory strike against Imperial Japan is being considered?”

“Yes, there is. Why do you ask?’

“Mr. President, while I and the Blackhawks were on the way to Washington, I devised a plan; one that is bold, daring and clever. When it is implemented, the Japanese will learn the error of their ways in the worst possible manner.”

“What do you have in mind?”

“Sir, I propose to use the two supercarriers my company built for the U.S Navy in order to launch an airstrike against Tokyo and certain other cities; the strike will be carried out by specially-modified versions of my Hercules transport aircraft, to be launched from the decks of the carriers.”

“What do you need from me, Mr. Smith?”

“Mr. President, I need the cooperation of the U.S. Navy for the use of their ships; for the U.S. Army Air Forces, I need to recruit certain personnel from among the service’s duty roster. The first officer I want to bring on board is Major James Doolittle. Should you give me permission, I will begin making preparations. My plan is for training to start immediately, with the raid to be carried out no later than the third week of April, 1942.”

“Very well, James. Secretary Knox, Secretary Stimson, please see to Mr. Smith’s requests.”

The two men exchange glances with each other, then Secretary Knox replies “yes, Mr. President.”
Date: December 29th, 1941
Location: various
Time: various

Now that the United States is officially at war, Mr. Smith issues an order that all of his merchant ships are to be armed; the conversion will take place as soon as each ship returns to its home port. All of his ships will have a common armament plan, to consist of a 5”/25 deck gun forward, two 3”/50 guns (one on either side of the deckhouse) and eight 23-mm twin mounts (four each on the port and starboard sides). These guns will be manned by naval personnel recruited for the purpose; these men will be referred to as the ‘Naval Armed Guard.’

Foreseeing the need for a super-heavy bomber capable of carrying the heaviest ordnance available, executives from Smith Aircraft Group and Lindbergh-Goddard Aerospace come to Washington, D.C in order to present their design proposal to General Henry ‘Hap’ Arnold (Chief of the U.S Army Air Forces). As envisioned, the proposed design will have six turboprop engines (of 4,600 shp each); three on each wing facing forward. The aircraft will have swept wings, a top speed of 435 mph, a cruising speed of 230 mph and a range of 10,000 miles. The maximum bombload is 86,000 lbs (two 42,000-lb bombs, four 20,000-lb bombs, seven 12,000-lb bombs, 80 2,000-lb bombs or any combination thereof) and the aircraft carries a total of 16 23-mm autocannons. These guns are in eight twin-mount turrets; the turrets in the nose and tail are fixed, while those on the top and bottom of the fuselage are retractable. To alleviate possible problems with ground pressure, the main landing gear will consist of a pair of bogies with four smaller tires on each (rather than one large tire).

One week later, the USAAF solicits a design proposal for a heavy ground-attack aircraft capable of operating at night as well as by day. Of the several designs that will be received from various aircraft manufacturers, Smith Aircraft Group’s is the most capable. It is based on the P-61 Black Widow from Mr. Smith’s original history; the night fighter version carries a crew of three, is fitted with radar and is armed with four 23-mm autocannons in a forward-facing ventral mount and four .50-caliber machineguns in a dorsal turret. The daytime version is even more heavily armed; it dispenses with the third crewman and the radar set. The four 23-mm cannons in the belly mount are retained (as are the four .50-caliber machineguns in the dorsal turret), and are supplemented by two more 23-mm autocannons in the nose (along with a MAC .50-caliber gatling). Additionally, both versions have enough exterior ordnance capacity to allow the carriage of ten 5" HVARs in racks of five (one under each wing).

In terms of maritime construction, SmithCorp’s shipbuilding program consists of seven Des Moines-class heavy cruisers, seven Cleveland-class heavy cruisers, four Atlanta-class light cruisers, 60 Gearing-class destroyers and 30 Balao-class fleet submarines. Previosuly, SmithCorp constructed two Essex-class supercarriers, four Iowa-class super battleships and six South Dakota-class battleships. In view of the U.S Navy’s increased need for warships, BuShips descides to increase the order by an additional 75 Gearing-class hulls, 60 Balao-class submarines and six Essex-class hulls. Additionally, orders are placed for as many Haskell-class attack transports, T3 tankers, C4-class cargo ships and Victory ships as SmithCorp Marine can provide. By the time the contract is completed, 80 Haskell-class attack transports, 52 T3 tankers, 80 C4-class cargo ships and 1,250 Victory ships will have been constructed.


Last edited by Garrity on Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:09 pm 
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That went better for Mr. Smith than I expected.

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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:15 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
That went better for Mr. Smith than I expected.

Indeed. As far as FDR and the others are concerned, Mr. Smith can practically walk on water.

You recall that supposedly wrecked ship of Mr. Smith's that's in Wake Island's lagoon? Well, it's got 10,000 tons of high explosives aboard (along with a further 5,000 tons of cast iron in the form of 4.5" balls). Guess what's going to happen after the evacuation and when the Japanese come ashore?

To paraphrase Marvin the Martian, there's going to be an "earth-shattering kaboom"...literally


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:22 am 
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You've got USS California down twice, once as "sunk" and once as "afloat with two bomb hits".
Quote:
USS California was hit by two bombs and a torpedo; she’s sunk but repairable. USS California, USS Tennessee and USS Maryland were hit twice each by bombs, but are still afloat


Otherwise, I'm enjoying this, as usual.

*EDIT*
Also... Why, when you've already got the C-130 in production, are you going to the B-36? Isn't that a step backwards? I mean, ok, it can carry a much larger payload, but what's the point? Isn't the next step precision guided munitions? I would have thought a B-52 would be the next logical step.

Finally -
Quote:
In terms of Marine construction,
Shouldn't that be maritime construction? It sounds to me like you're building Marines.

*EDIT*

Belushi TD

P.S. Sorry for the nitpicking.


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 Post subject: Re: Crime Time
PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:55 pm 
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Belushi TD wrote:
--snip--

Edited

Quote:
Also... Why, when you've already got the C-130 in production, are you going to the B-36? Isn't that a step backwards? I mean, ok, it can carry a much larger payload, but what's the point? Isn't the next step precision guided munitions? I would have thought a B-52 would be the next logical step.

The Hercules is being pressed into service so that the Doolittle Raid can carry a whole lot more ordnance to Tokyo and other cities. As for the B-36, it is intended to bridge the gap between the B-29 and the B-52

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It sounds to me like you're building Marines

Edited.

If Mr. Smith wanted to build Marines, he'd clone himself. The thought of a battalion-sized unit of such men (all with his physical and mental abilities) is terrifying...


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