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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 3:47 pm 
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What was missing that required another two states to be "sent back"?

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 3:57 pm 
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Still no coffee or chocolate sources :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 6:32 pm 
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Belushi TD wrote:
What was missing that required another two states to be "sent back"?

Belushi TD

Timber, iron ore, titanium, copper....


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 8:15 pm 
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Garrity wrote:
Belushi TD wrote:
What was missing that required another two states to be "sent back"?

Belushi TD

Timber, iron ore, titanium, copper....


That stuff was still there, only they have to start digging from scratch

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 5:08 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
Garrity wrote:
Belushi TD wrote:
What was missing that required another two states to be "sent back"?

Belushi TD

Timber, iron ore, titanium, copper....


That stuff was still there, only they have to start digging from scratch

Correct. Now with Minnesota and Michigan having joined the party, the mining won't have to start from scratch because all of the infrastructure and the equipment is in place.


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 Post subject: Good news and bad...
PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 10:47 am 
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Ah, 'Copy & Paste', which will ease new and old arrivals some-what.

Bad news, the too-convenient 'Second Event' sent my credibility gauge into the red.
Sorry, I can't follow this thread any more...
:( :( :(

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:45 am 
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Putting out the word
Date: January 15th, 1610
Location: the Office of the Secretary of State, Whiteman, AFB
Time: 9:00 AM

At his desk, Secretary of State Bob Kerrey sits down to compose a message that is to be sent to all embassies of the United States immediately. In part, the message reads:

To: All Embassies
From: SECSTATE
Re: Transition Event

You are hereby advised to inform the host country than another transition event took place on December 13th, 1609. The specifics of this occurrence are that two more states (Minnesota and Michigan) have been thrust backwards in time to join the four that are here.

No further activity is anticipated.

SECSTATE sends.

As soon as the message is completed, Secretary Kerrey hand-carries it to the State department’s communications section and orders that it be sent out with the highest possible priority. Elsewhere in the United States, Captain-General Alarcon and Captain Ortiz’ tour is at Fort Riley, Kansas when it is interrupted briefly. A staff NCO assigned to the post’s communications section hands a message to Colonel James Ferguson (who is about the explain the details of how an artillery strike is conducted). He says “Captain-General, I have just been handed a message which states that another transition event took place just recently.”

A look of shock and surprise crosses the faces of the two Spanish officers as the Captain-General replies “say you so, Senor Colonel? Might I enquire of the details?”

“Certainly, sir. It so happened that on the night of December 13th, two more states of the United States (those of Minnesota and Michigan) were gathered up and sent back to join us here. The President and the Secretary of State desire me to inform you (in your capacity as an official representative of the Spanish government) that relations between our two countries will continue and no changes will be made.”

“Gracias, Senor Colonel. It seems to me that the Almighty was not satisfied with what he set in motion two years ago, and that he desired to make some further changes to the course of history.”

“Indeed, sir. Now, as to the exercise we are about to witness, we have long-recognized that artillery is the ’King of Battle’. In past U.S military operations, artillery has operated to support the Infantry and to disrupt enemy operations by precisely-targeting camps, supply dumps, bridges, road junctions and other locations of that nature. We use our maps for arranging initial fire missions and, for more precise targeting , we use individuals called ’Forward Observers‘. What these men will do is to go forward, call for fire and them communicate back to the battery how their shells are falling.”

Captain-General Alarcon replies “si, Senor Colonel. In my younger days, I commanded batteries of artillery against His Most Catholic Majesty’s enemies on the fields of battle; so, I have a good grasp of artillery theory and practice. However, I would observe that there is a great deal of difference between what I know and what your gunners know.” Colonel Ferguson shakes his head slightly and replies “there isn’t that much difference in basic artillery doctrine as it is practiced today and how we did it in the time we came from. All that has changed is the artillery itself; our guns are far more powerful and have vastly longer range.”

“Si, senor. Even the largest guns that I know from my previous service didn’t have a range of much more than a mile. In my experience with the United States Navy, I saw that your nation’s guns can shoot much farther than that.”

“You are correct, sir. The most common gun that the U.S Army uses has a bore of 6.1”. These pieces can be towed by trucks, or they can be self-propelled; this means that the crews can take them into battle without having to wait to be moved by others. The towed guns have a crew of eight and can fire between two and five shots a minute out to a range of 15 miles. The shells they fire weigh 92.3 lbs and carry such payloads as smoke, incendiary compounds and high explosives.”

The two Spanish officers exchange looks of wonder as Captain-General Alarcon says “God be praised that our two nations have never come to blows. If something so unfortunate did happen, I have the feeling that such a conflict would be short, sharp and decidedly unpleasant.”

Colonel Ferguson acknowledges this with a silent nod of his head, then says “if you gentlemen will please direct your attention forward to the firing line, you will see an artillery crew making their piece ready to fire. The first thing that was done is to emplace the piece, which means that the gun was unhooked from its prime mover (the truck) and brought around to face in the general direction of the target. Next, the recoil spades were opened wide and dug in so that the gun doesn’t move too far backwards while firing.”

Colonel Ferguson points to the gun crew as they adjust the aim of their piece. Three of the crewmen are moving around the breech of the gun, and the Captain-General asks “what are those men doing, Senor Colonel?”

“Sir, they are loading the piece in preparation for firing it. Big guns such as the 6.1” howitzer use bagged powder charges which are rammed in behind the shell. Smaller guns such as the 105-mm howitzer use complete cartridges; much like those in our small arms.”

Just then, one of the gunners attached a lanyard to the gun’s firing lock and plays it out to its full length. When the gunner is in position, the chief of the piece calls out “STAND CLEAR”. he nods to the gunner with the lanyard and shouts loudly “FIRE!!”. The lanyard is pulled and the gun gouts forth a great blast of fire and smoke as it send the shell on its way. The target is just five miles away, so it isn’t very long before the two Spanish officers hear a far-off ’CRUMP’.

The gun crew readies another round and the gun is fired once again. The chief of the piece receives a communication from Range Control that his two shots are on-line with the target, but off by 75 meters. Accordingly, the gun’s traverse is slightly adjusted and the next two rounds are right on target. The chief of the piece looks over to Colonel Jameson, who says “Captain-General, would you be interested in firing the gun?”

“Aye, that I would, Senor Colonel.”

The two officers are escorted to the firing line, where they are introduced to the gun crew. SSG Holshuh (chief of the piece) says “sirs, if you will please give me your attention, I will sow you how the gun is loaded.” He looks to two members of the gun crew and nods; between them, they are carrying a shell on a two-handed cradle. The gun’s breechblock is opened and the shell is pushed into place by two more crewmen with a curved ramrod. Next, a fourth crewman comes up with a powder bag and this is rammed into place behind the shell.

The assistant gunner trips a release which closes the breechblock, then a primer is inserted into the firing mechanism. The lanyard is attached and, before it is handed to Captain-General Alarcon, SSG Holshuh says “gentlemen, you will need to put in earplugs to protect your hearing fro the noise of firing.” he take sout two small paper packages from one of his pockets and hand one of them to each Spanish officer. One of the packages is opened, and the use of the earplugs is demonstrated.

Once the ears of the visitors are so protected, SSG Holshuh hands the lanyard to Captain-General Alarcon and says “you may fire at your discretion, sir.” Hesitating not a moment, he pulls the lanyard and the gun fires. The noise and intensity of the muzzle blast is so unlike anything that either officer has experienced, that each man can’t help but flinch involuntarily.”

Captain-General Alarcon hands the lanyard back to SSG Holshuh and says “muchas gracias, Senor Seargente. That was an experience that I’ll not soon forget.” Colonel Jameson escorts his guests off the range and the tour of Fort Riley continues.

Putting out the word; Part 2
Date: January 15th, 1610
Location: The Palace Of Whitehall, London, England
Time: 4:30 PM local time

Shortly after receiving the message from the Secretary of State, Ambassador Boden immediately has himself taken by carriage to the king’s palace of Whitehall where he requests an immediate audience with the monarch; the ambassador’s prestige is such that the audience is granted without hesitation and he is conducted forthwith to the king’s council chamber where the monarch is holding forth with members of the Royal Council.

Ambassador Boden is introduced by the palace herald, and King James I says “hail and well-met, your excellency. It has been far too long since you graced our court with your presence.” The ambassador makes a courtly nod of his head and replies “I thank Your Majesty for this most kind reception. As to why I am here, my government desires me to inform your majesty and the court that there has been another transition event…”

A questioning look crosses the king’s face as he replies “how says your excellency? What do you mean?”

“Your Majesty, it has apparently pleased the Almighty to have two more states join those four which previously he sent into the past. I am specifically referring to the states of Minnesota and Michigan. Our wisest clerics and men of science know not why this happened, only that it did. The practical effects of this second event are that my nation‘s population has nearly doubled, and that we have gained access to enormous reserves of timber, copper and iron. Additionally, my nation now has direct access to those bodies of water that we call the ‘Great Lakes‘ and, through them, the Atlantic Ocean.”

The king falls silent for a moment or two, then replies “this is marvelous to our ears, your excellency. Truly, I say that the work of the Lord is most-wonderful to behold. Upon further consideration, we must confess to no small amount of curiosity as to how our brother monarchs of France and Spain will receive this news.”

“I do not know, your majesty. The only thing I can say is that the information will be conveyed by my fellow ambassadors as soon as possible; if not this very day.”

“Indeed, sir. Now that your excellency is here, you will do us the honor of dining with us, our family and members of our court.” Ambassador Boden replies “I will be very pleased to do so, your majesty.”

Putting out the word; Part 3
Date: January 15th, 1610
Location: The Louvre
Time: 5:30 PM

King Henri IV has just concluded a meeting of state with various nobles and officials of his court when one of the palace heralds comes up, executes a formal bow and says “your majesty, Ambassador Hamscher begs immediate admittance and says that he has an important message from his President”; the king nods and replies “admit him.” Shortly thereafter, Ambassador Hamscher is admitted to the royal presence and says “your majesty, please forgive me for coming here so suddenly, by the importance of the message I carry is such that it will not admit of any delay.”

“Very well, your excellency; you may proceed.”

“Thank you, your majesty. The substance of my message is that the President of the United States wishes me to tell you that there has been another transition event; it took place in December 13th. barely one month ago. Your Majesty will please recall the event which brought four states from my nation as it existed in the future and brought them here. Well, this second ‘Transition Event’ brought two more states to join us. The first of these is the state of Minnesota and the second is the state of Michigan.”

“Indeed. Has your excellency any opinion on how this happened?”

“Your majesty, our scientists examined pictures of the associated phenomena and have determined that they are exactly identical to those from the first Transferrence Event. Therefore, my government has concluded that the second event was brought about by whoever or whatever was responsible for the first. The clerics of my nation now believe this this event was the work of the Almighty.”

“S’trewth, your excellency. None but God himself could have brought back four of the states of your nation, then see fit to bring back two additional states to join them. The occurrence of two such miracles in just over two years is something that our most learned theologians will be debating for the foreseeable future.”

Putting out the word; Part 4
Date: January 16th, 1610
Location: the Palace of El Escorial
Time: 2:00 PM

As King Phillip’s palace is a good distance (334 air miles) from the U.S Embassy, Ambassador de La Vega chooses to make the announcement to the king in person. Therefore, the embassy’s UH-60 Blackhawk was made ready for flight earlier today. All mechanical and electronic systems were checked and re-checked, while the helicopter’s ground crew fitted a pair of conformal fuel tanks to the external stores support system (ESSS). When all was in readiness, the ambassador, an aide and four bodyguards from the Marine security element boarded the aircraft and took off for the vicinity of Madrid.

The flight took an uneventful two hours, and the helicopter came in for a landing in one of El Escorial’s several courtyards; by now, the palace staff is well-used to Ambassador de la Vega’s comings and goings in this manner. With no little sense of urgency, the ambassadorial party debarks the aircraft and is met by the palace chamberlain who says “hail and well-met, milord ambassador. Having met the chamberlain on several previous visits, de la Vega addresses the man by name and says “buenas dias, Senor Vargas. I have a message of surpassing importance for His Most Catholic Majesty from my government, and I must see him immediately.”

Something about the expression on Ambassador de la Vega’s face tells the chamberlain that he will brook no delay of any kind; therefore, the response is “very well, milord. I will conduct you and your staff to the grand library; His Most Catholic Majesty is passing the afternoon therein.”

The ambassador nods his head by way of understanding, then orders two of the Marine guards to remain with the helicopter while the other two accompany him and his aide. Some 15 minutes of so later, the King’s diversion over reading a Latin translation of one of Ptolemy’s works is interrupted by Chamberlain Vargas, who raps his staff on the floor three times and formally says “Ambassador de La Vega respectfully requests admittance to the King’s Presence on a matter of high importance.”

King Phillip III lays aside his book, gestures to the chamberlain and says “admit his excellency immediately.” The chamberlain bids the two marine guards to wait in one of the library’s antechambers, while Ambassador de la Vega and his aide go forward to meet the king.”

“A fair good afternoon is it not, your excellency? Pray tell what brings you here in such a haste? We heard your flying machine a short time ago and well-remember the importance of previous instances when you used it to come here.”

“Yes, your majesty. The importance of the message I have for your majesty from President Chu is so great that I had to come here and deliver it in person.” King Phillip III raises an eyebrow in curiosity as he bids Ambassador de La Vega and his aide to take their seats across the table from him.

“Your excellency, we know full-well that that you are neither given to dissimulation or exaggeration. Therefore, we will listen to what you have to say without the slightest reservation.”

“My thanks to your majesty. By specific request of the President of the United States, and with the approval of the Secretary of State, I am directed to inform your majesty that there has been a second transference event; it took place very recently, on December 13th to be precise.” An expression of surprise crosses the king’s face as he replies “the event which first brought your people here was similar in nature, was it not?”

“Yes it was, your majesty. In fact, this second event was more than similar to the first; it was identical. It resulted in two other states being brought back here, those of Minnesota and Michigan. It seems that the Almighty wasn’t quite done with us just yet.”

“Indeed, sir. What means this happenstance to future relations between your nation and the Crown of Spain?”

“Nothing at all, your majesty. In fact, it is the President’s express wish that things continue on exactly as they were before. It will be possible for your most catholic majesty to have a first-hand report of the two new states, as Captain-General Alarcon is still visiting the United States. Unless I am very much-mistaken, the Captain-General will have been informed of what happened. I am certain that his schedule will be altered so that he can see them in person.”

The king claps his hands with evident enthusiasm and says “capital, your excellency; we expect to be kept fully-informed of any developments. In the meantime, we will have you as our guest at court this evening. Our company of players will be performing ‘Don Quixote’ for us and ours, and we would be honored to have you and your staff stay in the palace tonight.”

“I thank your majesty for your kind offer and will be pleased to accept; I will inform my men that we’ll be staying here overnight, and send a messsage to the embassy to that effect.”

Putting out the Word; Part 5
Date: January 17th, 1610
Location: various
Time: various

When the second Transferrence Event occurred, the curiosity of the scientific community was immediately kindled. A number of meetings took place (both in person and via teleconference) in order to debate what had happened. The input of scientists from Minnesota and Michigan was particularly valuable, as (from their perspective) the second event took place just three days after President Obama’s State of The Union address, and that (also from their perspective) nothing had happened on the ground. To suddenly appear in the past and find that Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska were here waiting for them had certain interesting implications.

In one particular conference call, the President’s scientific adviser said to his colleagues form the physics departments of several universities “ladies and gentlemen, from the information provided by those of you in Minnesota and Michigan, it appears as if one of the assumptions made by those of us here in Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and Nebraska after the first event is incorrect. I am referring to just how we were transported; my natal assumption was that the four states were gathered up and transported back in time to the same geographical locations that they occupied in the future-that-was. My learned colleagues at the Universities of Minnesota and Michigan say that, from their perspective, all that happened on the night of February 4th, 2013 was an unusual atmospheric display, and that nothing was out of the ordinary in the Midwest or anywhere else in the United States.”

Dr. Cornelison pauses momentarily to refer to one of the documents on his desk, then continues by saying “first, if the four states had been physically transported in time, there would have been enormous craters where they formerly were. Second, if the transference event was actually a transposition, the territory which comprised the states as they were in 2013 would have been replaced with the same land from 1607. Yet, we know from the statements of the faculty of the School of Physics & Astronomy at UM and the Department of Physics at the University of Michigan that nothing had changed in the landscape of the upper Midwest. At least, until Minnesota and Michigan came to join us. If we are correct in assuming that the same being was responsible for both transference events, then the nature of both events would be identical. What I’m saying is that the being copied everyone and everything in the six states down to the subatomic level and caused the people and infrastructure of the states to reappear in the past in their original locations.”

Professor Warren Smith from the University of Michigan speaks up and says “Dr. Cornelison, the being was extremely detailed in his scanning. I direct your attention to certain pipelines, roads, utility lines, etc that happened to cross from the transported areas to those which stayed behind. These were cut off exactly at the state line with a precision that extended to the subatomic level; in effect, the resulting surfaces were perfectly smooth. Additionally, the Welland ship canal across the Niagra Escarpment is completely intact; though, none of its personnel are present.”

Professor Benjamin Bayman from the School of Physics & Astronomy joins the discussion by saying “there are other matters to be considered here. First, bridges from Minnesota and Michigan which happen to cross over rivers (or the Canadian border) are completely intact; they’re just cut off immediately on the other side. Second, the staff at the nuclear power plants in my state and Michigan report that each facility has three extra sets of fuel elements in storage; the extra nuclear fuel (and the facilities which hold it) seemed to have appeared out of nowhere. Lastly, the agricultural supply operations in Minnesota and Michigan report that they have five years worth of seed and fertilizer on hand; under the same circumstances as at the nuclear plants. From this and other evidence, it is logical to assume that the being responsible for both transference events wanted us to have as many advantages as possible; this speaks to me of an intelligence that is vast beyond imagining.”

Dr. Cornelison looks into the video cameras and says “Professor Smith, Professor Bayman, your observations exactly match what I and other colleagues in the four states saw after the first transferrence event. As to why the being chose to do what he, she or it did, no one can say.” After Dr. Cornelison finishes speaking, additional discussions take place over the next thirty minutes; then, the teleconference ends and the participating scientists proceed with their own business.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 5:48 am 
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Question, would the states want go back or stay?

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 10:45 am 
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jemhouston wrote:
Question, would the states want go back or stay?


An interesting question, to say the least. IMHO, if I happened to be visiting my parents in Iowa when the Transferrence Event happened, I would certainly want to go back.

The substance of the latter part of the update was that the states were copied and pasted back in the past, not physically transported. This means that the originals are still where they were in 2013.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 11:40 am 
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Garrity wrote:

An interesting question, to say the least. IMHO, if I happened to be visiting my parents in Iowa when the Transferrence Event happened, I would certainly want to go back.

The substance of the latter part of the update was that the states were copied and pasted back in the past, not physically transported. This means that the originals are still where they were in 2013.


which lends the question of how the transferrence effects the history they left behind, or would it just start an entirely new timeline where 2013 never happened as it did with the transferrence?

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2016 1:10 pm 
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Bob Dedmon wrote:
Garrity wrote:

An interesting question, to say the least. IMHO, if I happened to be visiting my parents in Iowa when the Transferrence Event happened, I would certainly want to go back.

The substance of the latter part of the update was that the states were copied and pasted back in the past, not physically transported. This means that the originals are still where they were in 2013.


which lends the question of how the transferrence effects the history they left behind, or would it just start an entirely new timeline where 2013 never happened as it did with the transferrence?

In the original timeline, the six states are still there; all that happened was some unusual atmospheric displays.

What the Transferrence Event did was to create an entirely new timeline.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
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Seeing is Believing
Date: January 18th, 1610
Location: Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Time: early afternoon

In the aftermath of the second Transition Event, Preisdet Chu issued orders that Captain-General Alarcon’s itinerary was to be interrupted and that he, Captain Ortiz and the other members of his staff were to be transported to visit Minnesota without delay. Earlier this morning, the Spanish party was driven to Marshall Army Airfield where they were picked up by a Kansas Air National Guard C-130 and flown to the Joint Air-Reserve Station at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Upon arrival, they were greeted by a delegation of senior officers from the Minnesota National Guard and conducted to the Distinguished Visitors quarters. From here, they will be taken to meetings with officials of the city, state and local governments.

The most senior officer present is Major-General Richard C. Nash, adjutant-general of the Minnesota National Guard. He and his staff greet Captain-General Alarcon, whereupon MG Nash says “welcome to Minnesota, Senor Captain-General. I trust you and your officers had a pleasant flight from Kansas.”

“Indeed we did, Senor General. When your Presidente Chu saw to it that we were told of the second Transition Event, it would be an untruth if I said that I and mine weren’t looking forward to seeing the new American provinces with our own eyes.” MG Nash replies “and so you shall. For now, you’ll be staying with us until Governor Dayton comes to meet with you here tomorrow.”

“I and my officers are at your convenience, Senor.”

Date: January 19th, 1610
Location: conference room, Joint Air-Reserve Station, MSP Airport
Time: 10:00 AM

In due course, Governor Dayton arrives at MSP to meet with Captain-General Alarcon and his officers. Greetings are once again exchanged, and Governor Dayton says “welcome to the great state of Minnesota, Senor; I hope that our hospitality is all that you expected.”

“It certainly has been, your excellency. Now that I and my officers are here, Presidente Chu wishes for us to visit wherever in this state that we can go. For now, there are several questions I would ask; the first of these is how many people live here and the second is how large is your state?”

“You can ask anything you like, Senor Captain-General. In regards to the state’s population, the last census listed Minnesota’s population at just under 5,490,000. In terms of land area the state is 86,939 square miles in extent. By way of comparison, Minnesota is larger than the island of Great Britain and nearly half the size of Spain.”

“Say you so, your excellency? As the United States before the Transition Event consisted of fifty separate states, the mind wonders just how truly vast your nation was. I would now ask what sorts of business is conducted here…” Governor Dayton nods his head by way of understanding and replies “Senor Captain-General, before the event which thrust the state into the past, Minnesota’s economic mainstays were forestry, iron mining, farm products (such as sugar beets sweet corn, green peas and turkeys). Aside from this, the state did much business with the nation of Canada just to the north of us and was heavily involved in shipping goods and materiel to other states along the shores of the Great Lakes as well as to overseas customers. It may further interest you to know that Minnesota’s iron deposits are the largest in the world and our trees were a major source of lumber for the American construction industry.”

“Fascinating. I have a particular interest in forestry as I am an officer in the navy of his Most Catholic Majesty King Phillip III of Spain; my nation’s forests have long been a source of lumber for the construction of ships and, as our largest forests are being harvested at an ever-increasing rate, we of the Navy and the realm’s merchant marine are constantly forced to search farther and farther afield for timber of the necessary size and quality.”

“Senor Captain-General, I can say without doubt that you will be more than pleased with what the forests of Minnesota can offer you. For example, the Transition Event had the effect of giving us back the trees and iron deposits that the territory had before it was settled; all of the forests are now what we call ’old growth’, never having been harvested before. One of the main tree species that grows here is white pine, the largest specimens range up to 150’-200’ tall and between 3’6” and 4’9” in diameter at the base; As for other types of trees, there are similarly-gigantic specimens. From what I know of shipbuilding, such trees would be ideal for the manufacture of new masts; we’ve got maple, birch, ash, elm, fir and several species of oak; several of which are useful for making ships’ timbers…”

Just now, one of Governor Dayton’s staff comes up and says “please excuse me sir, but you wanted to be notified when the cars are read to transport you and your guests around Minneapolis-St. Paul.” The governor looks to Captain-General Alarcon and his men and says “gentlemen, transportation is standing by outside to take us wherever we need to go. You’ll be my guests at the State House for the next several days and afterwards, I’ll make arrangements for you to visit other parts of the state (including the port city of Duluth and some of the iron mines in the northern part of the state.”

“Once again, your excellency has my thanks and those of my officers.”

Time: 2:00 PM
Location: President Chu’s office, Whiteman AFB

As part of today’s business, the President turns to his chief of staff and says “Ron, now that the states of Minnesota and Michigan are being integrated into our version of the United States, I think it imperative that each state take steps to reconstitute their delegations to the House of Representatives and the Senate. With this in mind, I will be making a call this afternoon to Governor Dayton of Minnesota and Governor Snyder of Michigan urging them to take whatever steps are necessary in this regard.”

Mr. Blair replies “excellent idea, Mr. President. There is another matter that I urge you to consider as soon as possible, this being the selection of your Vice-President. Ever since the first transition event nearly three years ago, the Executive Branch has been operating without a vice president. I think it goes without saying that having a VP would go a long way towards lessening your workload.”

“I see your point. Once the senate delegations from Minnesota and Michigan have been reconstituted and have entered upon their duties here, I want you to begin a search for suitable candidates. As soon as I make my choice, the candidate will be presented to the Senate for confirmation.”

“Very good sir. In other matters, I consider your term of office to have begun when you swore the oath of office on the night of February 4th, 1607. I presume that you’ll be running for re-election this coming November…”

“You are correct. We as a nation have to show the world that our system of government is stable, and how better to do that than to have an election. With this in mind, I want you to contact the heads of the Republican Party in each of the six states and urge them to nominate a candidate to run against me in November. After all, running unopposed would send the wrong signal to England, France, Spain and other countries.”

“I understand, Mr. President. The Secretary of Defense would like to see you in regards to a proposal he has.”

“Very well, Mr. Blair. Please send him in.”

Blair leaves the President’s office and SecDef Danner enters a moment or two later. President Chu greets him and says “good afternoon, Steven. Mr. Blair says that you have an idea that you would like to put forward for my consideration.”

“Yes sir, Mr. President; it concerns the expansion of our coastal forward operating bases, namely FOB Hope in Quebec, FOB Newport and FOB New York. In the aftermath of the second Transition Event I consulted with Secretary Charles Zelle at the Minnesota Department of Transportation in order to find out what shipping assets were brought along. He tells me that the Port of Duluth-Superior has a number of cargo vessels which went into Winter Lay-up between January 8th and January 25th, 2013; namely, MV Mesabi Miner‘, MV American Century, MV American Spiri‘, MV John J. Boland, MV John G. Munson, MV Roger Blough and MV Indiana Harbor’. Before the Transition Event, these vessels served to carry loads of iron ore, limestone, coal, cement or general cargo throughout the Great Lakes region. In terms of size, Mesabi Miner, American Century, American Spirit and Indiana Harbor are each over 1,000’ long; their capacity for dry cargo is 62,336 tons each. However, they are far to large to pass through the Welland Ship Canal (as are MV John G. Munson and MV Roger Blough; 768’ and 858’ long respectively); the cargo capacities are 34,000 tons each. What makes MV John G. Boland particularly suitable for what I have in mind is that her length is 680’ (well-under the Welland Canal’s maximum capacity of 740’); she’s fitted with a cargo unloading boom that measures between 250’ long; this means that no shore-based equipment is need to unload her.”

“I see. What is it that you have in mind, Mr. Secretary?”

“Mr. President, I propose that the John G. Boland be tasked with delivering supplies and equipment to FOBs Hope, New York and Newport. Before, we’ve had to resort to the expedient of towing Mississippi River cargo barges behind ships of the U.S Navy in order to supply those bases. With just that one vessel servicing the forward operating bases, the amount of materiel that can be moved will increase greatly. If more capacity is needed for the re-supply and expansion effort, additional hulls can be called up from those in winter-lay-up at the ports of Detroit and Dolomite in Michigan. Additionally, the second Transition Event brought the United States an additional benefit.”

“What is that, Mr. Secretary?”

“Sir, Fraser Shipyards in the Port of Duluth is capable of repairing and building ships of up to 831’ in length and 80’ in the beam. When the time comes, having this excess building capacity will be very useful.”

“Very well, Steven. You are authorized to enter into negotiations with the Port of Duluth to secure the services of MV John G. Bolland. Once this is done, I want you to coordinate with Secretary Ruan and his staff at the Department of Transportation and develop a range of plans to utilize the ship’s carrying capacity.”

“Yes, Mr. President.”

Initial Moves
Date: January 16th, 1610
Location: various
Time: Various

Once the initial chaos surrounding the Transition Event had been dealt with, the first actions of the National Guard organizations in both states was to send exploratory parties of troops into the territories that formerly comprised the now-unoccupied neighboring states. For Minnesota, this meant that forward operating bases were set up just on the other sides of the borders with North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin; for Michigan, FOBs were put into operation in Indiana and Ohio. For both states, posts were also set up on the Canadian side of the now-nonexistent border. As soon as it was realized that the Welland Ship Canal through the Niagra Escarpment was intact, an emergency operations team composed of personnel from the U.S Coast Guard, the Port of Huron, the Port of Detroit and the port of Sault Ste. Marie were dispatched to take control of the canal and keep it in operation. These were augmented by the 1436th Engineer Company and the 1775th Military Police Company of the Michigan National Guard; the former to provide needed construction support and the latter for site & perimeter security.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 8:22 pm 
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I suspect any large US cargo vessel going overseas will have an escort.

BTW, how well could an Great Lakes based vessel handle the open ocean?

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2016 9:07 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
I suspect any large US cargo vessel going overseas will have an escort.

and be armed in its own right, rather like the armed merchant ships used by the United States in World War II. I'm thinking (depending on the ship's size) a 5"/25 deck gun forward and a pair of pedestal-mounted 3"/50s; one gun on either side of the superstructure. Smaller weapons would be .50-caliber and .30-caliber machine guns.

Quote:
BTW, how well could an Great Lakes based vessel handle the open ocean?

Given that such vessels are designed to operate 'when the Witch of November comes stealing...', rather well, I would suspect. Initial runs by MV John G. Boland will be up the Welland Ship Canal, through the St. Lawrence Seaway and along the northeastern coast of North America; I rather like the idea of being able to re-supply with FOBs with materiel by the thousands of tons.

I have to smile at the possible reaction of the powers-that-be in England, France, Spain and elsewhere when they catch sight of one of these ships coming by. Anyone of the larger lake freighters has a cargo capacity that exceeds when the ENTIRE English merchant fleet of 1610 can carry....


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 12:31 am 
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A thought occurred to me about this setting.

If I was in this setting and I had the means, I'd try building some 19th C. clipper ships to sell to the various 17th C. nations. They're sail ships so it shouldn't take 17th C. sailors all that long to master them, but clippers would be significantly faster and have a larger cargo capacity compared to 17th C. merchant ships. A "Windjammer" clipper (the largest type of clipper built) called the Parma could carry over 5000 tons of bagged grain, as an example.

Also, the US would have a monopoly on making high quality sheet steel needed for the hulls, since historical iron hulled clippers weren't possible until advancements in iron smelting and forming large iron plates of consistent quality occurred in the early 19th C. Replace that 19th C. sheet iron and rivets with modern sheet steel and modern welding, plus an ample supply of old growth timber for masts and spars.

The biggest hurdle might be developing a fresh set of design blueprints, since there wouldn't be any surviving 19th C. clipper ships to examine in this setting.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 10:38 am 
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GarethB wrote:
A thought occurred to me about this setting.

If I was in this setting and I had the means, I'd try building some 19th C. clipper ships to sell to the various 17th C. nations. They're sail ships so it shouldn't take 17th C. sailors all that long to master them, but clippers would be significantly faster and have a larger cargo capacity compared to 17th C. merchant ships. A "Windjammer" clipper (the largest type of clipper built) called the Parma could carry over 5000 tons of bagged grain, as an example.

Also, the US would have a monopoly on making high quality sheet steel needed for the hulls, since historical iron hulled clippers weren't possible until advancements in iron smelting and forming large iron plates of consistent quality occurred in the early 19th C. Replace that 19th C. sheet iron and rivets with modern sheet steel and modern welding, plus an ample supply of old growth timber for masts and spars.

The biggest hurdle might be developing a fresh set of design blueprints, since there wouldn't be any surviving 19th C. clipper ships to examine in this setting.


Who says they have to be exact duplicates of a clipper ship?

Why not use some computers to design a clipper ship-type vessel?

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 2:15 pm 
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I wasn't thinking in terms of an exact copy of a 19th C. clipper, maybe it would be easier to develop a fresh design from scratch than I'm anticipating. Considering that all major US shipbuilding is currently being performed by companies that until very recently worked primarily on river craft, I was wondering about the extent of design art for a hull type which those companies would be extremely unlikely to have constructed before, and the anticipation of stresses on a large sail rigged hull which would not be the same as a more up to date engine powered hull. Even with modern software that contains data on many hull types which a working shipyard would likely have, what sort of data would they have on sail rigging of the type a clipper ship would use?

Another thought I had was engineered laminated wood as a possible way to produce masts and spars without having to rely on finding trees of the right dimensions, but I don't know enough to be sure that laminates would perform well in that role. A quick search found details of laminated spars used in the 1995 restoration of USS Constitution, but USS Constitution is handled with kid gloves compared to how hard a merchant sail ship in this setting is likely to be put to use.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2016 3:44 pm 
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GarethB wrote:
I wasn't thinking in terms of an exact copy of a 19th C. clipper, maybe it would be easier to develop a fresh design from scratch than I'm anticipating. Considering that all major US shipbuilding is currently being performed by companies that until very recently worked primarily on river craft, I was wondering about the extent of design art for a hull type which those companies would be extremely unlikely to have constructed before, and the anticipation of stresses on a large sail rigged hull which would not be the same as a more up to date engine powered hull. Even with modern software that contains data on many hull types which a working shipyard would likely have, what sort of data would they have on sail rigging of the type a clipper ship would use?

Another thought I had was engineered laminated wood as a possible way to produce masts and spars without having to rely on finding trees of the right dimensions, but I don't know enough to be sure that laminates would perform well in that role. A quick search found details of laminated spars used in the 1995 restoration of USS Constitution, but USS Constitution is handled with kid gloves compared to how hard a merchant sail ship in this setting is likely to be put to use.


Composites and polymers would be very interesting in that regard. So would some plastics...

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:09 am 
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GarethB wrote:
A thought occurred to me about this setting.

If I was in this setting and I had the means, I'd try building some 19th C. clipper ships to sell to the various 17th C. nations. They're sail ships so it shouldn't take 17th C. sailors all that long to master them, but clippers would be significantly faster and have a larger cargo capacity compared to 17th C. merchant ships. A "Windjammer" clipper (the largest type of clipper built) called the Parma could carry over 5000 tons of bagged grain, as an example.

Also, the US would have a monopoly on making high quality sheet steel needed for the hulls, since historical iron hulled clippers weren't possible until advancements in iron smelting and forming large iron plates of consistent quality occurred in the early 19th C. Replace that 19th C. sheet iron and rivets with modern sheet steel and modern welding, plus an ample supply of old growth timber for masts and spars.

The biggest hurdle might be developing a fresh set of design blueprints, since there wouldn't be any surviving 19th C. clipper ships to examine in this setting.

An excellent suggestion, sir. The forests of Minnesota and Michigan (to say nothing of those in Rhode island, Massachusetts and elsewhere) would be excellent source material.

As for plans of a Windjammer or other similar vessel, I'm sure that any decent library will have books on shipbuilding.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:13 am 
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clancyphile wrote:
GarethB wrote:
I wasn't thinking in terms of an exact copy of a 19th C. clipper, maybe it would be easier to develop a fresh design from scratch than I'm anticipating. Considering that all major US shipbuilding is currently being performed by companies that until very recently worked primarily on river craft, I was wondering about the extent of design art for a hull type which those companies would be extremely unlikely to have constructed before, and the anticipation of stresses on a large sail rigged hull which would not be the same as a more up to date engine powered hull. Even with modern software that contains data on many hull types which a working shipyard would likely have, what sort of data would they have on sail rigging of the type a clipper ship would use?

Another thought I had was engineered laminated wood as a possible way to produce masts and spars without having to rely on finding trees of the right dimensions, but I don't know enough to be sure that laminates would perform well in that role. A quick search found details of laminated spars used in the 1995 restoration of USS Constitution, but USS Constitution is handled with kid gloves compared to how hard a merchant sail ship in this setting is likely to be put to use.


Composites and polymers would be very interesting in that regard. So would some plastics...


Quite so. Plastics and polymers can be sourced from the crude oil in Kansas and the other states.

I suspect that building a full-scale 19th-century type clipper ship will be quite an undertaking. In any case, this has given me some material to consider for a future update; namely, where to put a shipyard for building vessels for sale to the other powers in the 17th century.


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