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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 7:00 pm 
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Garrity wrote:
clancyphile wrote:
Composites and polymers would be very interesting in that regard. So would some plastics...


Quite so. Plastics and polymers can be sourced from the crude oil in Kansas and the other states.

I suspect that building a full-scale 19th-century type clipper ship will be quite an undertaking. In any case, this has given me some material to consider for a future update; namely, where to put a shipyard for building vessels for sale to the other powers in the 17th century.


FOBs Mobile and Newport strike me as good options right away.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 8:21 pm 
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clancyphile wrote:
FOBs Mobile and Newport strike me as good options right away.

Agreed. For Newport, New England white pine will be superb sourcewood for masts & spars, while the northern live oaks in that area will be excellent for planking, framing and the knees

FOB Mobile already has a shipyard, so it will only be a small matter to set aside some space for the purpose of building sail-powered hulls


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:43 pm 
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Here's an interesting page on clipper ship hull designs. There were all wood clippers. iron hulled clippers and a composite hull design where the frame of the ship was iron and the rest was wood. http://mcjazz.f2s.com/ClipperShipPlans.htm

This composite approach might be viable as follows. Build the more complicated hull frame sections from modern steel, either prefabricated in the US or send a team of welders with their equipment and the metal frame sections as pre-cut pieces that the welders assemble in-situ. The rest of the ship can be made from wood. Also supply the timber that a customer cannot source for themselves and the whole set is delivered as a "kit" which the customer puts together in their own shipyard. The towed barge idea you've been using in this story will work to deliver everything, all that's missing are some merchant ships or deep water tugs of some sort to tow the barges rather than task USN warships to tow barges carrying commercial freight.

If I was doing this, I'd at least try to fully build and test one or two ships in the US as a proof of concept trial, then they could be demonstrated to potential customers to see who's willing to buy some.

Synthetic fabric sails and synthetic ropes is another market opportunity, lighter and stronger than natural fibre and not prone to rotting.

Edited to revise my thoughts.


Last edited by GarethB on Tue Nov 22, 2016 12:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 11:57 pm 
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GarethB wrote:
Here's an interesting page on clipper ship hull designs. There were all wood clippers. iron hulled clippers and a composite hull design where the frame of the ship was iron and the rest was wood. http://mcjazz.f2s.com/ClipperShipPlans.htm

This composite approach might be viable as follows. Make the more complicated sections of the ship's frame from metal as prefabricated pieces. The rest of the ship can be built from wood. Rather than construct the entire ship in the US, build the metal sections in the US and supply whatever amount and types of timber the customer can't source for themselves. Deliver it all as a "kit" to a foreign buyer and they can build the ship in their own shipyard. This will need appropriate ships to deliver the "kit", but it's a pattern that could be applied to a variety of sail hull designs, not just clippers.

If I was doing this, I'd at least try to fully build and test one of two as a proof of concept trial, then they could be demonstrated to potential customers to see who's willing to buy some.

Excellent suggestions, I say. Whatever ship designs that the U.S chooses to make available for the world market are going to be VERY popular


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:25 am 
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One thing about building bigger ships is have the ports able to handle them, Check with the users on what they would like

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 7:47 am 
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Yes, many ports may need an upgrade to handle substantially larger ships.

While I'm on a roll here, a suggestion for another type of "clipper", but one with wings and engines. Flying boats! :D


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 11:57 am 
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If you're going into clipper ships you'll need ropeways and walks capable of producing enough. A clipper requires something like 35 miles of rope of various thicknesses, grades and gauges. Does this exist in your current transported USA, or would they need to buy it in? Manila cordage is the best in the world.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:00 pm 
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Craiglxviii wrote:
If you're going into clipper ships you'll need ropeways and walks capable of producing enough. A clipper requires something like 35 miles of rope of various thicknesses, grades and gauges. Does this exist in your current transported USA, or would they need to buy it in? Manila cordage is the best in the world.

The ropeways and walks don't exist as yet, so they'll have to be built. There is the possibility of supplying synthetic (nylon) cordage and sail, however


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:33 pm 
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Synthetic cordage would be an enormous improvement over hemp, that is for sure.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 9:00 pm 
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And who's to say it has to be muzzle-loading cannon?

Something like the WWII 75mm pack howitzer might be a huge improvement over contemporary cannons, yet still leave the US with technological superiority.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sun Nov 27, 2016 9:48 pm 
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Garrity wrote:
Craiglxviii wrote:
If you're going into clipper ships you'll need ropeways and walks capable of producing enough. A clipper requires something like 35 miles of rope of various thicknesses, grades and gauges. Does this exist in your current transported USA, or would they need to buy it in? Manila cordage is the best in the world.

The ropeways and walks don't exist as yet, so they'll have to be built. There is the possibility of supplying synthetic (nylon) cordage and sail, however



Have them built in overseas works. Have US supply help in upgrading to make what's needed.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Mon Nov 28, 2016 5:28 pm 
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clancyphile wrote:
And who's to say it has to be muzzle-loading cannon?

Something like the WWII 75mm pack howitzer might be a huge improvement over contemporary cannons, yet still leave the US with technological superiority.


Or something like the Hotchkiss mountain gun; even more primitive than the pack howitzer (but light-years ahead of anything else in the 17th century)
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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 6:26 pm 
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Seeing The Sights
Date: January 20th, 1610
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
Time: 12:00 noon

Captain-General Alarcon’s tour of Minnesota continues with an in-depth visit to the State Capitol in the city of Saint Paul. Here, he and his aides are met by a member of Governor Dayton’s staff and shown all throughout the complex. Upon seeing the building, the captain-general replies “your house of government is most-fair to behold. Pray tell how does your government work...”

Mr. James Francisco replies “sir, the State of Minnesota has a bi-cameral legislature. This means that it is divided into two separate houses; the Senate and the House of Representatives. The state is further divided into 67 separate districts, and each of these elects one senator and two representatives. The senators stand for election every four years, while the representatives are elected every two years. Executive authority is vested in the Office of the Governor; the current governor is Mark Dayton, whom you have already met. Under the state constitution, the governor’s term of office is four years, and there is no limit to how many terms he can be elected to serve. Lastly, the state court system has three levels; the first of these is the district courts, which are the courts of general jurisdiction. Above these are the courts of appeal, which hear appeals from the district courts and challenges to various acts of the state government. Highest of all is the state supreme court, which hears discretionary appeals from the court of appeals, convictions for 1st-degree murder and has original jurisdiction where election results have been called into question.”

“Most interesting, young sir.”

After the tour is over, the next item on the agenda is a formal luncheon with Governor Dayton. This time, however, the majority & minority of the Senate and the House of Representatives are in attendance. Also at the meeting are the mayors of the twin cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul, plus representatives from the state’s timber and mining interests. During this meeting, a number of topics of mutual interest are discussed, with questions asked and answered about Minnesota’s economy. After the discussion, Mr. Steven Roberts from PolyMet Mining’s executive office in St. Paul presents two mineral specimens to Captain-General Alarcon so they can be conveyed to King Phillip III as an indication of the state’s mineral resources.

The first of these is a large copper nugget, which weighs 28 lbs and was recovered from the shores of Lake Superior. Captain-General Alarcon hefts the nugget with both hands and says “this is a most-remarkable piece, Senor Roberts; are there more like this to be had?” Mr. Roberts replies “sir, this piece is called ‘native’ copper because it is nearly 100% pure. Smaller specimens of such are quite common, but pieces of this size and larger are rare”

“I like the rounded form of it, ‘tis most pleasing to the eye; almost as if it had been cast like this by some master artisan.”

“Senor Captain-General, the form of this piece is entirely natural. You see, at some timein the far-distant past, the forces of erosion broke it off from a large mass of reef copper and deposited it in a nearby stream where it was tumbled and smashed like an ordinary river rock until it assumed its present form.” The captain-general nods his understanding, then turns his attention to the second specimen. Mr. Roberts takes it out of its box and says “this is a kind of iron ore called hematite. In classical times, the ancients would mine ore like this in order to produce the metal for their tools weapons and armor. This particular specimen weighs all of 18 lbs, and has an iron content of 78%. In other words, this piece of ore is so pure that it can be forged and welded by a blacksmith without any further purification.”

“Fascinating. I am quite sure that His Most Catholic Majesty will be delighted to receive these specimens.”

Next to speak is James McNeil, from Minnesota Forest Industries (an association representing the state’s lumber industry and its allied trades. He says “sir, in the next three days, you and your staff will be going on a tour where you’ll see how lumbering operations are conducted in this state. I believe that my colleague Mr. Roberts will be making a similar arrangement in regards to Minnesota’s iron districts.”

“Senor, I an my staff are looking forward to it.”

As the luncheon concludes, Mayor Chris Coleman speaks up and says “Captain-General, tonight you and your staff will be attending a performance of ‘Don Quixote’ at the Fitzgerald Theater in downtown St. Paul. Afterwards, you’ll be the guests of the city at the St. Paul Hotel over on Market Street. Tomorrow morning, your visit to the state’s timberlands and mining districts begins.” Captain-General Alarcon exchanges glances with the members of his staff, then says “Senor Alcalde, Your Excellency, on behalf of His Most Catholic Majesty, I and my staff than you for the courtesy with which we have bene received; we are certainly looking forward to seeing more of your state.”

A cabinet meeting
Date: January 20th, 1610
Location: President Chu’s office, Whiteman AFB
Time: 3:00 PM

Later this afternoon, President Chu is hosting a cabinet meeting in his office. Those in attendance are SecTrans John C. Ruan III, SecTreas Esther George, SecDef Steven Danner and SecInt Ken Salazar. The first item on the agenda is a proposal by Secretary George for a new issue of coinage. President Chu calls the meeting to order and says “Madam Secretary, the floor is yours.”

“Thank you, Mr. President. One thing that still ties us to the world that we came from is the coinage in circulation throughout the six states. Though Presidents Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, Roosevelt and Kennedy will always be near and dear to our hearts, we have to acknowledge our present situation by creating a new issue of coinage; if for no other reason than what currently exists will eventually wear out.”

President Chu thinks for a moment, then replies “an excellent idea, Madam Secretary. What do you have in mind?”
“Mr. President, the design of new coinage is within the purview of my department. Applicable federal law states that the changing the designs of coins can take place no more often than once every 25 years, unless sooner authorized by Congress. Present denominations affected by this law are the penny, nickel and quarter, while the dime and half-dollar are not. The design of the Lincoln Cent changed in 2009, while those of the Jefferson Nickel and Washington Quarter changed in 2004 and 1999 respectively; I would need Congressional authorization to change them. For the dime, I propose a re-issue of the ‘Winged Cap’ (also known as the ‘Mercury’) dime, which originally circulated between 1916 and 1945. The obverse device of this coin shows the head of Liberty wearing a winged cap (which symbolizes freedom of thought); as an aside, this denomination became known as the Mercury dime because of the strong resemblance of the obverse device to Mercury, messenger of the gods in classical antiquity.”

“Madam Secretary, the choice of this design for the new dime is particularly appropriate, given that freedom of thought is a rare concept here in the 17th century. What of the design for the half dollar?”

“Sir, for this denomination, I briefly considered the Barber half dollar (originally issued between 1892 and 1915). Upon further consideration, I have settled upon the Walking Liberty half dollar, which was originally issued between 1916 and 1947. I chose this design because it is one of the most beautiful coins ever minted; rich with American symbolism.”

“Excellent choice, Madam Secretary. Once you receive congressional authorization to change the design of the other denominations, what are your choices?”

“Mr. President, given that native Americans will form an important part of society in the future, I think it only proper that the Indian Head cent and the Buffalo nickel be re-issued. For the quarter, I propose that the design of the Barber quarter be used. This denomination was issued between 1892 and 1916; the obverse features a capped, rightward-facing head of Liberty wearing a circlet of laurel leaves; the reverse features a heraldic eagle based on the Great Seal of the United States. For the dollar, I propose that the Morgan dollar design of 1878-1921 be used. In regards to the $2.50, $5.00 and $10.00 gold pieces, their designs will be copies of the Indian Head coinage issued between 1907 and 1933. The difference here is that the quarter eagles and half eagles will feature raised (rather than incuse) designs. Lastly, the $20.00 double eagle will be a copy of the original Augustus St. Gaudens design.”

“Do you propose that silver and gold coins be re-introduced for general circulation?”

“No, Mr. President. Of course, the Indian head cent will be struck from copper, while the nickel, dime, quarter, half dollar and dollar will either be struck from a cupro-nickel alloy or have a clad composition as appropriate. Silver editions of the dime, quarter half dollar and dollar will be struck in proof (or as specimens of business strikes). The gold coins will be struck as proof or as specimens of business strikes.”

“Madam Secretary, after hearing your ideas, a thought strikes me. Before the Transition Event and in times past, the United States would strike special issues of proof coins for presentation as diplomatic gifts; the most famous example of these is the proof set presented to the King of Siam in 1836, which contains the large cent, half dime, dime, quarter, half dollar, quarter eagle and half eagle (all dated 1834), plus the dollar and $10.00 eagle. The two later coins are of particular numismatic interest because they were dated in the year 1804, having been struck with new dies made to the patterns in use in that year. How better to impress foreign potentates than by presenting specially-made proof sets?”

“An excellent, idea, Mr. President.”

The next report comes from SecState Bob Kerrey and SecDef Steven Danner. Kerrey speaks first and says “Mr. President, I have chosen a suitable candidate to serve as U.S. ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. He is Professor James Herbert from the University of Michigan, and is currently serving as the chair of that institution’s Department of Medieval & Early Modern Studies. Professor Herbert speaks the language fluently, and has an encyclopedic knowledge of Ottoman history and politics up to and including the present day.” In support of secretary Kerrey, Secretary Danner says “Mr. President, Admiral Wilson reports to me that the ships necessary for the diplomatic mission will be ready within 45 days. The lead vessel will be the Sumner-class DD USS Wichita; she will be further accompanied by the Block II Hazard-class DE USS Simpson and a pair of Lincoln-class patrol gunboats; the three latter vessels will remain on-station after USS Wichita leaves in order to provide security back-up for the embassy compound. For actual boots on the ground, Secretary Kerrey has requested the services of a full Marine rifle company; I am inclined to agree with this because of the recent unpleasantness between the United States and the Ottoman Empire. The embassy’s air support would be in the form of two UH-60 Blackhawk helicopters with External Stores Support Systems, while the Marine security element would be backed up by two LAV-25A2s, four Peacekeeper ASVs and 16 M1151 HMMWVs.”

President Chu looks to Secretary Kerrey and says “very well, sir. I will nominate Professor Herbert for the post of U.S. Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire and forward the nomination to the Senate for confirmation. Secretary Danner?”

“Yes, Mr. President?”

“You are directed to gather such men, materiel and supplies as are necessary to support the diplomatic mission to Constantinople, and to have those ships ready as soon as possible.”

“Yes, sir.”

A certain development
Date: January 22nd, 1610
Location: one of the many taverns in Paris
Time: late morning

In the normal course of embassy business, Ambassador Hamscher has fallen into a somewhat-regular routine of visiting the Royal Court and receiving distinguished visitors at the embassy (both from nobles of the realm and, occasionally, from King Henri IV himself). This hasn’t gone un-noticed by a certain disaffected segment of French society, namely the one headed by Francois Ravaillac. Even before the so-called ‘Americans’ came to France, the King’s policies were the source of much discontent among Ravaillac and his followers. Just now, Ravaillac and his fellow conspirators are discussing the influence that the Americans are coming to have at court.

Ravaillac turns to his principal lieutenant Henri de La Tour and says “Henri, in all truth, I mislike the inroads that the Americans have made at court. Already, their beliefs, customs and practices are becoming popular amongst many noble families and the commons; it is an offense against all common decency, I say!!”; this is followed by Ravaillac emphasizing his displeasure by angrily pounding the table in front of him with his mug.

De La Tour replies “what’s to be done against them, Francois? The American embassy is a virtual fortress, and those ‘Marine’ guards are like nothing I have ever seen before. I know this because I have visited the embassy several times before, on the pretext of setting up a trading relationship with the United States. I say in all truth that attacking the embassy would be foolhardy in the extreme.”

Jules Reynaud leans close and says “Francois, Henri, it seems to me that the obvious solution would be to strike at the Americans in such a way that the ambassador loses his importance at court. What say you to this?”

Ravaillac nods his head sagely, then replies “agreed, though I have a far better idea. The king and the ambassador must die. You all know that I have visited the royal court several times and have tried to meet the king on several occasions without success; you see, I wanted to convince the king of the wisdom of ordering the conversion of the Hugenots to the one, true faith of Roman Catholicism. Not only have I been ignored, I have been treated like some ignorant, dirt-footed peasant.”

The boldness of Ravaillac’s proposal catches his companions quite by surprise then, after some little consideration, they find themselves taken by it. Paul Chavillac exclaims loudly “whatever the plan, I am with you”; both Reynaud and de La Tour nod their eager agreement.

Ravaillac grins malignantly and says “with such friends as you behind me, our great enterprise can hardly fail. Now, as to what is to be done, I ahve seen that, on several visits to the court, Ambassador Hamscher has never been attended by more than one guard. I believe that our greatest chance for success lies with catching the king and the ambassador when they are away from the Royal Court and the American embassy. For now, let us keep watch on them; perhaps some opportunity will suggest itself.”

Date: February 15th, 1610
Location: the grounds of the Chateau de Fontainebleu
Time: late afternoon

After keeping watch on the king and the American ambassador for more than two weeks, the opportunity that Francois Ravaillac and his fellow conspirators have bene waiting for presents itself. It so happened that King Henri IV had previously invited Ambassador Hamscher to attend a tournament with him; the event was held earlier today on the grounds of the Chateau de Fontainebleu in the Sein et Marne Department, just outside of Paris. After the event was over, the king ordered his coachman and his attendants to take his majesty and Ambassador Hamscher back to the royal palace. Ravaillac and his fellow conspirators were in the audience at the tournament, and secretly withdrew before it was over in order to make preparations for their attack.

Ravaillac and de La Tour armed themselves with long daggers concealed inside their doublets, while Reynaud and Chavillac prepare their wheellock pistols. These weapons are charged with powder & ball, the pans are primed with fine powder and the pyrites are adjusted in the dog heads so as to give sure fire. Lastly, each pistol’s dog head is lowered down onto the sliding pan cover and the weapons are concealed under short cloaks.

A trumpet fanfare indicates that the king and the ambassador are leaving the chateau, so Ravaillac gathers his friends and says “mes amis, now is the time to strike. We will attack just as the king and the ambassador are getting ready to board the royal coach. Jules, you and Paul will shoot the ambassador’s guard, while Henri will stab the ambassador; I will kill the king. Forward I say, and let God’s arm strike with us!!”

As is usual, Ambassador Hamscher is accompanied by a member of the embassy’s Marine security group. Today, the one with the duty is GySgt Jim Peterson. Ever alert for danger to his principal, Peterson has his head on a swivel as he walks closely behind the king and the ambassador. Suddenly, out of the corner of his eye, Peterson catches sight of four men with looks of grim determination writ large on their faces. Then the four break out into a run while shouting “DEATH TO THE HERETIC, DEATH TO THE INTERLOPER!!”

GySgt Peterson loudly shouts a warning “YOUR MAJESTY, MR. AMBASSADOR; LOOK OUT!!!”, then quickly moves to interpose himself between the attackers and his protectees. Jules Reynaud and Paul Chavillac are in the lead as they drew their wheellock pistols from under their cloaks and simultaneously shoot Ambassador Hamscher’s guard in the chest. To their very great surprise, the man doesn’t fall dead to the ground; when the two assassins didn’t know was that GySgt Peterson is wearing Level-III soft body armor under his MARPAT fatigues. With skill born of long practice and much experience, Peterson instantly draws his sidearm and engages the two closest attackers with three shots each in less than two seconds total (two to the body and one to the head).

Reynaud and Chavillac fall dead to the ground, but this doesn’t deter Ravaillac and de La Tour in the slightest. Intent on killing the king and the American ambassador, their faces are drawn back with looks of utter hatred as they raise their daggers and continue their attack. The threat isn’t over, so GySgt Peterson re-engages and kills them both, just as quickly as the first two.

Peterson’s shouts and the ensuing gunfire quickly draw attention from the guards at the Chateau de Fontainebleu. In very short order, two squads of cuirassers come riding and take charge of the situation. In the royal coach, of what just happened settles upon King Henri IV and Ambassador Hamscher; both men sit heavily back in their seats, then the ambassador speaks up and says “your majesty, are you unharmed?” Not surprisingly, the king is quite shaken up at his escape from certain death; it takes his majesty some little time to recover his composure. When he does, the king says “Your Excellency, truly Almighty God has seen fit to spare our lives this day; we are indeed fortunate that your sergeant was along with us. To show our gratitude, we hereby create Sergeant Peterson as a Chevalier of France; with all the rights, honors and privileges appertaining thereto. Additionally, we also give him a commission as a lieutenant in the King’s Musketeers. He will also receive further tokens of our admiration and esteem.”

Ambassador Hamscher politely interjects and says “Your Majesty, GySgt Peterson’s first duty is to the United States Marine Corps. For purposes of American law, these appointments must be ceremonial. As a duly designated representative of my government, I see no problem with the gifts that your majesty intends to bestow. Once I return to the embassy, I will send a message to my government informing them of what happened and of my decision in regards to GySgt Peterson.”

Just then, the cuirassers from the Chateau form up around the coach; there are three riders on each side, with a further ten in front and behind. Each man is wearing a suit of ‘three-quarter’ plate armor, and is armed with a scabbarded sword hung in a baldric over the right shoulder, a pair of wheel lock horseman’s pistols in pommel holsters and a horseman’s axe slung from the pommel itself. When all is in readiness, the command is given to ‘MOVE OUT’.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 9:17 pm 
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Impressive. I'm surprised some of the local military aren't training with the Marines.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Thu Dec 01, 2016 11:51 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
Impressive. I'm surprised some of the local military aren't training with the Marines.

They are, it's just happening 'off-camera', so to speak.

IRL, Francois Ravaillac assassinated King Henri IV on May 14th, 1610.


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Infrastructure Expansion
Date: February 17th, 1610
Location: various
Time: various

Once affairs in Minnesota and Michigan settled down in the aftermath of the second transition event, serious thought was given to using certain newly-arrived assets in order to support FOB Hope, FOB New York and FOB Newport. Of all the Great lakes freighters which made it through the transition, only the MV John G. Bolland is small enough to fit through the Welland Ship Canal.

MV John G. Bolland was built in Wisconsin in 1973 under the name of MV Charles E. Wilson. Then in 2000, the ship was given its present name to honor John G. Bolland, founder of the American Steamship Company. The ship measures 680’ OAL, with a beam of 78’ and a maximum draft of 31’; Bolland’s cargo capacity at maximum draft is 39,000 GRT, with lesser a capacity of 29,600 GRT at a draft of 27’6”. As commissioned, the ship’s purpose is to carry bulk dry cargoes (such as cement, iron ore and coal) to the ports in the Great Lakes region.

Once it was realized that MV John G. Bolland was the only vessel small enough to fit through the Welland Ship Canal, plans were made to user he to support the further expansion of FOB Hope, FOB New York and FOB Newport. By request from the Department of Transportation, the ship was taken out of winter lay-up by the American Steamship Company and begun to be re-fitted in order to handle break-bulk cargo. Her cargo handling & storage facilities consisted of six large internal holds (with a total of 22 external hatches on the weather deck), an internal, self-unloading cargo conveyor (in the stern of the ship) and a 250’ cargo boom with a conveyor belt (mounted just forward of the deckhouse). This boom is capable of turning both to the left and to the right, with a total arc of 105 degrees. As this system can’t be used to unload break-bulk cargo, the internal conveyor will be removed; the 22 cargo hatches will be removed and replaced with six large deck hatches (one for each hold); these hatches will have two halves, be hinged longitudinally and also be capable of being sealed against even the heaviest weather. Additionally, the 250’ boom will be converted into a crane; there will also be a smaller traveling crane mounted forward on the weather deck (aft of the bow) which will be used to service those holds which can’t be reached by the 250’ crane. Aside from removing the 22 smaller hatches and replacing them with six larger hatches and removing the internal conveyor system, the floors and bulkheads in the six cargo holds will be specially-reinforced in order withstand the extra hull stresses involved in handling break-bulk cargo.

The purpose in these specific design changes was founded in an order sent by Secretary of Defense Danner to the command staff at each of the three forward operating bases. The particulars of the order are that a quay is to be constructed at each facility, to be of such a size that ships of up to 750’ OAL, 80’ in the beam and 35’ in draft can be accommodated. Given that the United States intends to enter the market for constructing sail-powered vessels, the order was amended to include direction for setting up shipyards at FOB New York and FOB Newport; each of which is to have twelve slipways. For FOB New York, the shipyard will be on the western bank of the East River, just above the southern tip of Manhattan Island; for FOB Newport, they shipyard will be on the shore just above the base’s location; the equipment for these shipyards will be among the first loads of cargo delivered by MV John G. Bolland when’s she’s ready for service in the Spring.

Local People, Local relations
Date: February 19th, 1610
Location: FOB Narragansett, RI
Time: Various

When FOB Narragansett was first established, Canonicus (paramount chief of the Narragansetts) saw the arrival of the strangers as a direct challenge; he assembled a host of his warriors and sent a challenge to their leader in the form of a sheaf of arrows wrapped in leather. Being knowledgeable of Rhode Island’s early colonial history, FOB Newport’s commanding officer replied by sending the leather wrap back, this time containing two leather bags; one containing lead bullets and the other one containing black powder. When these were returned to Canonicus’ village of Chaubatick, it so happened that some of the black powder was accidentally spilled near one of the village’s campfires and ignited. This caused the Narragansett shamans and Chief Canonicus himself to regard the strangers with superstitious fear and awe. It was some little time before communications could be opened and trade established with the Narragansetts and the other tribes In Rhode Island. Eventually, however, enough understanding of the languages was gained so that a peaceful understanding could be reached between the Americans and the natives. Above almost all else, what sealed the friendship between the Narragansetts and the Americans happened when Canonicus’ wife went into labor; the baby was in the breech position and both mother and child would have died but for the intervention of two physicians from FOB Newport. Thanks to their efforts, the child was delivered safely and the mother survived. In a twist of fate, the baby was named ‘Canonchet’ by his father in a public ceremony in the village of Chaubatick.

FOB Narragansett’s initial personnel roster was especially chosen in order to avoid the horrific possibility of inadvertently setting off a ‘virgin field’ epidemic; everyone underwent a thorough health screening in order to ensure that no one had diseases of any kind (even the common cold). Additionally, everyone assigned to the FOB underwent a full program of vaccinations; when enough trust had been built up between the Americans and the natives, the vaccination program was likewise extended to cover the Narragansetts and the other tribes in Rhode Island (the Eastern Niantic, the Nipmuc, the Pequot and the Wampanoag). The Narrgansetts were (and are) an interesting case study. As of the current date, they are at their full strength. The tribe has some 4,500 members spread over six different villages, each of which has a separate sub-chief. These villages are Chaubatick (near what would later be called Providence, Rhode Island), Maushapogue (in Providence County), Mittaubscut (on the Pawtuxet River, seven or eight miles above the mouth), Narragansett (above the site of what would have been Kingston, Rhode Island), Pawchouquet (in western Rhode Island) and Shawomet (near what would have been Warwick, Rhode Island). Of the other tribes, only the Eastern Niantic (with their main village of Wekapaug on the Great Pond near what would have been Charleston, Rhode Island) could come close to challenging the Narragansetts in terms of the size of their population, with a total of 2,000 members.

As part of FOB Narragansett’s development, survey teams were sent all throughout Rhode Island in order to document the geography and natural resources of the territory. One team in particular proceeded by boat through the northern reaches of Narragansett Bay, onto the Providence River and sailed upstream to the Seekonk River as far as the Pawtucket Falls; a second team proceeds to the location of what would have been Bristol and Barrington in order to find the anthracite coal seam which is known to be there, while a third team goes upstream to the west bank of the Blackstone River to the location of what would later be called Quinsnicket Ledge.

Above Pawtucket Falls, the watercourse is known as the Blackstone River; below the falls, it is the Seekonk River (a tidal inlet of Narragansett Bay. All along the banks of the river, the presence of various species of enormous trees (beech, American chestnut, red maple, eastern white pine, northern red oak, red oak, black oak, white ash, willow, birch) is noted. It is of particular interest to the team members to see the chestnut trees as they once were, because the species had been largely destroyed by chestnut blight in the first half of the 20th century.

Up from the riverbanks, the character of the woodlands in several places is noted to resemble a park, in that the Narragansetts and the other tribes would periodically set fires in order to burn off the underbrush and open up the land for agriculture. There are locations, however, where tall timber goes down almost to the water’s edge.

In regards to fishing, the primary species in the Narragansett Bay watershed are Atlantic salmon, shad, river herring, rainbow smelt and sturgeon. The waters of the bay and its associated rivers are still pristine, being enormously productive and a major source of food for the Narragansetts and the other tribes in the area.

In regards to FOB New York, its developement has proceeded along the same course as FOB Newport. Unlike in Rhode Island, the only native tribe in the area of what would have been New York City is the Lenni Lenape. FOB New York was founded on the lower end of Manhattan Island near the approximate location of what would have been Fort Amsterdam; after the initial settlement, peaceful overtures were made to the Lenape after which the island was acquired in exchange for trade goods (just as it was in the original history). This time, the Lenape got a considerably better deal; instead of just trinkets (beads, ribbons, etc), they got material that was entirely practical (cast-iron cooking pots, frying pans, fire grates, tripods plus steel-bladed hatchets, axes, knives, spears; woolen blankets, cloth, salt, rotary querns for the grinding of grain, etc). Aside from the trade goods, the Lenape received the same kind of medical outreach as did the Narragansetts and the other tribes in Rhode Island.

Tokens of Esteem
Date: February 22nd, 1610
Location: the U.S. Embassy, College de Clermont, Paris
Time: later afternoon

As was previously promised by King Henri IV, GySgt James Peterson, USMC receives those tokens of esteem promised by his majesty in gratitude for saving his life during the recent assassination attempt. The gifts are conveyed by Monsieur Gaston de Pluvinel (an officer in the king’s service) and delivered to the U.S Embassy compound t the College de Clermont; the first of these is an officer’s-grade garniture of armor and weapons, made in the royal workshops at St. Etienne. The armor is a three-quarter set of plate (of the type worn by French cuirassers), consisting of helmet, cuirass, pauldrons (shoulder guards), rerebraces (to protect the upper arms), 5-lame couters (to peotect the elbows) and cannons (to protect the forearms). The cuirass has an attached fauld (to protect the waist) and tassets (to protect the hips); lastly, there are a pair of cuisses to protect the thighs.

Though plain in design, the armor’s excellence lies in the skill with which it was made. The protection given by the cuirass is enhanced by a stop-rib riveted to the chest plate just below the neck; in combat, this would serve to deflect sword and lance thrusts aimed at the wearer’s neck. Since armor of this type is not designed to be used in conjunction with a shield, the left side of the cuirass’ chest plate has been reinforced in order to take the shock of a lance thrust and the odd sword stroke. The armor’s only affectations to style are that the neck and shoulder holes all have roped edges, while the lames of the fauld and the tassets all have bronze edging.

Rounding out the garniture are the weapons, consisting of a basket-hilted cavalry sword, a seven-flanged mace with a spiral shaft and leather-wrapped grip and a matching horseman’s axe with a scalloped blade. The mace and the axe are plain in design and manufacture, but the sword is elaborately decorated as befits the weapon of a high-ranking officer. The blade is of watered steel, while the hilt is blued, chased with decoration and set with silver inlays. Finally, the grip is wrapped with braided gold wire set with turks-heads at the top and bottom.

Complementing the garniture is an elaborate saddle, a pair of wheellock horse pistols in pommel holsters and a wheellock petronel (carbine) carried at the waist on a broad leather shoulder strap; weapons like these are useless without powder flasks & tools, so there is a matching set of bullet mold & tools for all three weapons, plus and engraved ivory powder flask and priming flask.

The king’s beneficence continues with a package containing an officer’s uniform for the King’s Musketeers, consisting of a wide-brimmed black hat with a feathered plume, a dark-blue tabard & tunic, red pantaloons, a knee-length dark blue cloak (with a fold-down collar) lined with red silk, high boots with fold-down cuffs and long gauntlets (both items are of brown kidskin leather). The tabard and cloak are embroidered with the king’s personal device (a stylized cross) in silver thread, and are likewise trimmed with silver braid.

At the conclusion of the presentation ceremony (which took place in Ambassador Hamscher’s office, Monsieur Gaston de Pluvinel turns to the ambassador and says “God be thanked that your man Sergeant Peterson was in a position to do as he did. If His Majesty had been murdered by that foul cretin Francois Ravaillac, it would have been an absolute disaster for France.” Ambassador Hamscher replies “you are quite welcome, Monsieur. GySgt Peterson only did his duty, as any United States Marine would have.”


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2016 6:11 pm 
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Author's Note:

ITTL, the King's Musketeers were formed in late December, 1594 after the assassination attempts by Pierre Barriere in August, 1593 and Jean Chatel in December, 1594. IOTL, they were formed in 1622 by King Louis XIII.


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2016 7:16 pm 
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So far getting to know the locals is running smoothly.

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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sat Dec 31, 2016 8:21 pm 
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jemhouston wrote:
So far getting to know the locals is running smoothly.

Indeed; that is precisely the idea.

As an aside, I wrote the section about Pawtucket Falls because I grew up in Pawtucket; having lived there from 1970-1992, i will always have a special place in my memory for that city.

IRL, Canonchet was the son of Miantonomoh (nephew of Canonicus). It was Canonchet's warriors who wiped out the men of Captain Michael Piece's command in the action of March 26th, 1676. IMHO, the entirety of King Phillip's War could have been avoided if the colonial authorities hadn't been such complete and total assholes towards the natives.......

http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcon ... 20Fight%22

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Men%27s_Misery


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 Post subject: Re: A more perfect union
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 12:13 pm 
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It may have escaped me, but why is POTUS still working out of an Air Force Base?

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