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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:16 pm 
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Looks like there's not going to be an "American Pie" ITTL. Buddy Holly would only be about 18 years old, and not really famous yet. Same with Ritchie Valens, but at age 14? Was he performing at that point? The Big Bopper would only be 24 at that point. Suspect that Don McLean will not be inspired by their deaths.

The other option (at least until I saw that Presley was waiting for his draft notice) is that Elvis would die.

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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:36 pm 
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Buddy Holly will be drafted before he makes a big splash and some of the others will end up going down different life and musical paths. I dislike the notion of killing off figures willy nilly, so use that rather sparingly.

The lack of earlier mention of Rock Around the Clock and subsequent developments is quite deliberate. I'll have to look at my notes for full details of the circumstances of rock musicians of the 1950s, but Chuck Berry is still in prison and Little Richard is just about to come out of the Army in Panama. The identities of those who died in the car crash will come out if no one guesses them.

So, you are quite correct. No American Pie, among other songs. This isn't to say that there won't be a moral panic about whatever pop music American youth are listening to, but they it will be a different one.


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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 12:48 pm 
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Too bad. I REALLY like that song.

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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Sat Apr 22, 2017 8:05 am 
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The entire cultural background which lead to the writing of the song in the late 60s/early 70s will turn out quite differently here:

- There won't be an emblematic air crash taking the lives of three pop singers, although it is quite possible that all involved will somehow be involved with music. It just won't be exactly the same type of rock and roll, with each tending towards a different subgenres of music that will be viewed as linked as 'pop music'.
- The background of generational change is inevitable, but will be constrained by the lack of a Sexual Revolution in the 1950s and 1960s.
- Many of songs and artists referenced throughout the song, particularly those in the 1960s, simply won't exist. There is no Beatles or Beatlemania, no British Invasion, no highly prolific Dylan (he'd just be coming out of the Air Force as of 1964), no Elvis craze and no counterculture in the second half of the 60s.
- The absence of the Kennedy assassination, a high profile Civil Rights struggle and a Vietnam War will have an impact on relative attitudes towards authority, government and the older generation on behalf of the Baby Boomers.
- There will most likely still be some level of protest in America, Britain and elsewhere, but it will get the type of short shrift that it received in the 1950s.
- Television and films won't see the same lifting of censorship and standards that they did in the @ 1960s, at least not to the same timetable.

I'm going to carry over some of the 1960s cultural development discussion to the Space thread, as it fits within that framework.

A few more general observations:

- British economic growth is moving at a fair clip, but is behind that of the USA and Europe for structural and historical reasons stretching back to the 19th century.
- China and India are having very different decades, despite the circumstances of war in the former case. India's general rate of growth is high and not stuck in the 'Hindu rate of growth' as in @. These two cases on their own will have a major change on the world economy and balance of power by the late 1960s.
- The different evolution of the Middle East and certain different geological patterns make the likelihood of an oil shock happening in the same fashion quite unlikely. Arab-Israeli relations are moving in a mirror image of @.
- A huge difference is the Korean War ending in apparent Allied victory, not to mention the end of the so-called nuclear taboo and chemical weapons being used quite heavily. It also required a much larger commitment of forces and mobilisation, which is still reflected in the force structures and sizes of the major Western powers of 1960, 1961 and 1964 - on the one hand, conventional war worked and on the other, nuclear weapons arguably finished their second major war in a row. I do want to expand upon this in depth when I get to the end of the Korean War history, but there will be a lot of different political, strategic and military lessons drawn from the war and I would be quite interested in the perspectives and opinions of readers.
- French 'victory' at Dien Bien Phu, if survival and withdrawal can be classed as a victory. This changes the strategic calculus in Vietnam and in Indochina in general, making the French pull-out under US pressure a non-starter. For at least the next 10 years, the French will maintain a military presence in South Vietnam, based around 1-2 regular divisions plus colonial and Foreign Legion troops, a small but powerful air contingent and a naval battlegroup.


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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:16 am 
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1955

January
January 1: The Kingdom of Bhutan issues its first postage stamps.
January 2: Assassination of President Jose Cantera of Panama at a racetrack in Panama City.
January 3: Rosafred, a Swedish passenger ship runs aground off Stockholm.
January 4: The Empire of China declares that its words are backed by nuclear weapons.
January 5: President Taft is released from Walter Reed Hospital after enjoying a rapid recovery from his heart attack. He still appears to be sickly, but returns to his duties as rapidly as possible.
January 6: Public announcement of the provisional ceasefire in the Indochina War, leading to mixed reactions in Paris and Vietnam.
January 7: Release of the British animated feature film Animal Farm, based on the celebrated allegorical novel by George Orwell.
January 8: Selangor State in Malaya is declared free of all communist terrorist activity.
January 9: Soviet speed skater Boris Shilkov breaks the men's 5000m world record in Medeo, Kazakhstan.
January 10: Entry into service of the A3D Skywarrior strategic naval bomber with the US Navy.
January 11: Two French Air Force Shackletons collide in midair over Corsica, killing all on board.
January 12: The Royal Navy Small Arms Development Establishment begins testing of a new power sword to replace previous cutlasses.
January 13: Sir De Villiers Graaff is sworn in as Prime Minister of the Union of South Africa.
January 14: A group of London-based adventurers announce the discovery of a map to Long John Silver's fabled treasure.
January 15: Imperial Mining begin operations at a new large bauxite mine in Weipa, Queensland.
January 16: Juan Manuel Fangio wins the Argentine Grand Prix in Buenos Aires.
January 17: Public announcement of a major international summit of the Great Powers in Constantinople, to be held in February.
January 18: A large USAF base is established in the Trucial States.
January 19: First release of the board game Scrabble.
January 20: The Soviet Union unexpectedly drops its former objections to a Council of the League of Nations motion calling for an internationally supervised plebiscite on the reunification of Korea.
January 21: Formation of the Irish Farmer's Association in Dublin.
January 22: The Pentagon announces that the United States will field an intercontinental ballistic missile by 1956.
January 23: An express train is derailed at Sutton Coldfield railway station, killing 17 people.
January 24: Arianius Rex, a great golden wyrm hatched in the reign of King Arthur, is enthroned as the new Grand Dragon of the Royal Flying Corps.
January 25: The Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union announces an end to the state of war between the USSR and Germany.
January 26: Columbia University scientists develop an atomic clock accurate to within one second in 500 years.
January 27: A clash between Indonesian Navy and Royal Australian Navy patrol boats off the coast of Western New Guinea leads to the withdrawal of the Australian ambassador from Jakarta for consultations in Canberra.
January 28: President Taft announces that the United States will deploy naval and air forces for the protection of the Chinese Republican state on Taiwan.
January 29: The British Transport Commission produces a report on the Modernisation of British Railway which proposes the introduction of new steam locomotives, major resignalling projects and extensive capital investment in the rail and canal networks.
January 30: Denali, the highest mountain in Canadian Alaska and North America, is renamed Queen Elizabeth II Peak.
January 31: A suspected sighting of Dracula in Amsterdam sparks a massive security operation involving forces from no less than seventeen countries.

February
February 1: Great tornadoes ravage several counties in northern Mississippi.
February 2: England beat Australia by 5 wickets at the Fourth Test in Adleaide to take an unbeatable 3-1 lead in the 1954/55 Test series and retain the Ashes.
February 3: Opening of the first branch of the Empire Steakhouse restaurant chain in London.
February 4: Signing of Baghdad Pact, a regional mutual security agreement by Britain, France, the United States, India, Iraq, Persia, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Arabia and Egypt. The non-participation of Israel attracts considerable criticism from British and American politicians and newspapers.
February 5: The Soviet battlecruiser Stalingrad docks in Surabaya, further increasing regional tensions.
February 6: The Norwegian Archaeological Expedition to Rapa Nui, lead by the renowned Thor Heyerdahl, departs Christiana for South America.
February 7: Establishment of the Royal Lao Air Force and Royal Lao Navy are established.
February 8: Canadian sailors in the North Pacific report the sighting of an enormous blue whale more than twice the size of any previously creature.
February 9: Merger of the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organisations.
February 10: Opening of the Constantinople Summit, attended by Stalin, President Taft, Prime Minister Churchill and Premier de Gaulle. Security is extremely heavy, with Anglo-American and Soviet naval task forces tensely monitoring each others activities. The American proposal for an 'Open Skies' agreement to allow mutual defence observation is tersely refused and Stalin declines to enter into discussion of any change in the status of Poland and Romania. Some small progress is apparently made on the principle of normalizing East-West trade relations and a broad philosophical commitment to the use of the League of Nations to avoid global conflict, but little of substance is achieved. Western observers note that Stalin seems to be somewhat different in mannerism and style.
February 11: Opening of the Rome Metro to passenger service.
February 12: NYPD detectives, paladins and sorcerers destroy a vampire lair hidden deep beneath the subways of New York City, bringing an end to their reign of terror.
February 13: The Grumman F11F Tiger enters initial operational service with the United States Navy.
February 14: Discovery of the ancient tomb of a barbarian king in Northern Scotland by oil prospectors. The skeletal remains of the tall warrior clutch a remarkably preserve Atlantean sword.
February 15: Construction begins on a top secret space rocket base at Baikonur in the Kazakh SSR.
February 16: 96 people are killed in a fire at an elderly person's home in Yokohama, Japan.
February 17: The Committee of Imperial Defence begins a extensive study into the global defence strategy of the British Empire in the new post-Korea situation.
February 18: A secret meeting of the ODESSA and Space Nazi agents in Paraguay agrees upon the initiation of Operation Sunrise.
February 19: French archaeological wizards demonstrate a recreation of Ancient Egyptian pyramid power at a conference in Strasbourg.
February 20: An American astronomer declares that the chances of intelligent life coming from Jupiter or Saturn are 'a billion to one'.
February 21: The Emperor of China announces that he will not object to the League of Nations plebiscite in Korea. Private undertakings are reached for the expedited withdrawal of United Nations Command troops south of the 38th Parallel to assuage Chinese security concerns.
February 22: Large scale flooding begins in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales, eventually costing 25 lives.
February 23: Freezing conditions across Britain result in dozens of roads being blocked by snow and cancellation of rail service across many parts of the country. The Royal Air Force makes deliveries of foodstuffs and medical supplies to the hardest hit areas.
February 24: A USN Convair R3Y-1 Tradewind sets a new flying boat speed record in a flight across the continental United States, flying from San Diego, to NAS Patuxent River, in 8 hours and 46 minutes at an average speed of 432 mph.
February 25: The Red Army begins testing of a large combat tripod, causing considerable consternation in the West.
February 26: George F. Smith becomes the first man to survive aircraft ejection at supersonic speed, escaping from a North American F-100 Super Sabre flying at Mach 1.25.
February 27: The Japanese Democratic Party returns to power at the General Election, winning 205 seats to 124 of the Liberal Party.
February 28: Signing of a secret memorandum agreement between the United States, Japan and the British Empire regarding Japanese rearmament in Tokyo, ostensibly motivated by the Gojira Attack, but more broadly focused on counterbalancing Soviet and Chinese power in North East Asia. Previous restrictions on the manufacture, purchase or operation of strike aircraft, capital ships, submarines and aircraft carriers are to be effectively lifted.

March
March 1: Signing of the Treaty of Seoul, marking a formal end to the Korean War. The national plebiscite is scheduled to follow in August.
March 2: USS Midway and her accompanying task force arrives in Australia, her visit marking a sign of overt American support for Australia in the ongoing New Guinea dispute.
March 3: England win the Fifth Test at Sydney by 10 wickets, taking the Ashes series 4-1. Frank 'Typhoon' Tyson takes 5/26 in Australia's second innings to bring his series total to 36 wickets at an average of 19.2
March 4: 15 leaders of the Communist Party of Great Britain are arrested and charged with seditious conspiracy.
March 5: President of the United States Robert Taft dies in Washington D.C. at 0925 aged 65, from a brain hemorrhage resulting from complications arising from pancreatic cancer. It is revealed that he learned of the diagnosis in December, but continued at his duties to work for a resolution of the Korean plebiscite and to attend the Geneva Summit. The nation and free world grieves for his loss and his funeral is to be marked by a national day of mourning. Vice-President Roger Thompson is sworn into office as the 32nd President shortly after Taft's death.
March 6: Clashes between the Spanish Inquisition and the Rosicrucian Brotherhood take place in Lisbon over the discovery of scrolls of ancient wisdom.
March 7: HMS Dreadnought arrives in Sydney on her second world cruise.
March 8: Discovery of major new oil deposits in the mountains of central New Avalon.
March 9: The state funeral for President Taft is held in the National Cathedral in Washington D.C. It is attended by 35 heads of state and government and the stoic courage of President Thompson and his young family is approvingly noted by the international media.
March 10: Mexico unveils the prototype of an indigenous tank design.
March 11: Death of Nobel Prize-winning scientist Sir Alexander Fleming, aged 73.
March 12: Stalin approves of the formation of secret experimental orcish units in Siberia.
March 13: The King of Nepal dies under suspicious circumstances.
March 14: Colonial and church officials begin a crackdown on the Rastafarian sect in Jamaica on grounds of heresy, sedition and suspected connections to Communists.
March 15: The Grand Duke of Burgundy, the richest man in France, dies at his estates in the West Indies, aged 87.
March 16: A runaway train carrying explosives is halted by the timely intervention of a caped superhero outside New York City, preventing a potentially calamitous accident.
March 17: Britain successfully tests a hydrogen bomb on Christmas Island in the Pacific.
March 18: The five match India-Canada Test cricket series ends in a 2-2 draw.
March 19: General Sir Arthur Percival, best known for his meritorious wartime role as Chief of Staff to Field Marshal Wavell in South East Asia Command, retires from his position as Governor-General of Ceylon.
March 20: Forging of first magic great sword since the Second World War begins in Avalon.
March 21: A large part of the westerly portion of Craggy Island, a small island off the west coast of Ireland, is washed away in a freak storm
March 22: A USN R6D crashes into Pali Kea Peak near Honolulu, killing all 66 passengers and crew on board.
March 23: The Norwegian ocean liner Venus runs aground near Plymouth.
March 24: Commissioning of HMS Warspite, the Royal Navy's second atomic powered submarine.
March 25: The German Democratic Republic is granted full sovereignty by the Soviet Union.
March 26: Bill Hayes tops the American charts with 'The Ballad of Davey Crockett, marking the beginning of the coonskin cap craze in the United States.
March 27: Two motorised regiments of Hispanic Knights arrive in Spanish West Africa in their first significant postwar deployment.
March 28: New Zealand are dismissed for 26 in the Second Test against England at Eden Park.
March 29: An experimental electric train in France sets a new speed record of 352kmph, damaging the track in the process.
March 30: On the Waterfront wins Best Picture at the 27th Academy Awards, with Marlon Brando winning Best Actor and Ronald Reagan winning Best Supporting Actor for The Liberators.
March 31: Four members of the Victorian Labour Party are expelled, forming the Australian Labour Party (Anti-Communist), marking the beginning the Great Split in the ALP.

April
April 1: A reclusive British chocolate factory owner announces a competition for tours of his secretive manufacturing plant.
April 2: Duncan Edwards becomes the youngest English international footballer in a 7-2 win over Scotland at Empire Stadium.
April 3: A horrendous passenger train crash in Guadalajara, Mexico kills over 300 people.
April 4: Decommissioning of the Brazilian battleship Silvado, the last operational vessel in the world armed with 16" guns.
April 5: Sir Winston Churchill retires as British Prime Minister, having served from 1940-1945 and 1948-1955. He is created Duke of London by Queen Elizabeth II in honour of his great service. Succeeding him as Prime Minister is Sir Anthony Eden, who asks the Queen to dismiss Parliament and call a general election.
April 6: The Douglas B-66 Destroyer medium bomber enters service with the United States Air Force.
April 7: Chinese backed irregular forces step up raids along the Tibetan border.
April 8: British intelligence agents uncover a Soviet backed diamond smuggling ring in Sierra Leone.
April 9: The United States performs a tactical atomic bomb test at the Nevada Test Site as part of Operation Teapot.
April 10: Korean martial artists agree on the name of taekwondo for their newly developed composite martial art.
April 11: An Admiralty study predicts that the Royal Navy will field atomic powered battleships, aircraft carriers, cruisers and destroyers by 1965.
April 12: First successful test of powered armour at Fort Knox.
April 13: 21" of rain fall in Axis, Alabama in a 24 hour period, establishing a new state record.
April 14: The United States declares that it supports a policy of free interplanetary trade.
April 15: Ray Kroc opens his first McDonalds hamburger restaurant in Des Plaines, Illinois.
April 16: Release of Richard III, starring Laurence Olivier in the title role.
April 17: Opening of an anti-colonial conference in Bandung, Indonesia.
April 18: The Saab 32 Lansen supersonic jet fighter enters service with the Royal Swedish Air Force.
April 19: Production of the Volkswagen Type 2 begins in Germany, after the return of the factory and equipment from Britain in 1953 and encouraging success in sales of the Volkswagen Type 1.
April 20: A scantily clad swordsman subdues a dragon terrorizing a town in Oklahoma.
April 21: 30 people are killed in a cave-in in Minas Gerais, Brazil.
April 22: The Saab 34 medium jet bomber enters service with the Royal Swedish Air Force, representing a considerable jump in capability over their previous English Electric Canberras. Negotiations regarding the acquisition of Vickers Valiants with the British Government continue.
April 23: Inauguration of the Super Continental train service by Canadian Railways.
April 24: Yucatan and Mexico extend their defensive alliance for a further ten years.
April 25: Eric Liddell is knighted for services to athletics and the Church.
April 26: An unexpected meteor shower over Central Europe lights up the night skies.
April 27: Opening of the Exposition Universale in Paris.
April 28: Discovery of enormous gold deposits near Mount Jayawijaya in New Guinea.
April 29: Announcement of the discovery of a new element, Mendelevium, at UCLA Berkeley.
April 30: The last Cornish engine still in use is phased out of service at South Croft.

May
May 1: Signing of the Warsaw Treaty between the Soviet Union, the German Democratic Republic, Poland and Romania, establishing a mutual defensive alliance.
May 2: Tennessee Williams is awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. The expected follow up to William Forrester's sensational debut novel Avalon Landing, which won the 1954 Pulitzer Prize for Literature, is yet to be published.
May 3: Publication of The Magician's Nephew, the latest book in C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia.
May 4: President Thompson announces a wide-reaching defence review.
May 5: Two Dutch murderers are hanged in Amsterdam.
May 6: Three Strategic Air Command B-49s complete a non-stop flight around the world in an exhibition of the long range striking power of the United States.
May 7: Newcastle United win the F.A. Cup, defeating Manchester City 4–2 at Empire Stadium.
May 8: Exhibition of the world's biggest cake in an Indiana fair.
May 9: The first two prototypes of the eight-engined Tu-95 strategic heavy jet bomber, given the codename 'Bear' by US military intelligence, enters test service with the Soviet Air Force. It is considered to represent a substantial advance in capability over the Bison and Badger.
May 10: A British construction firm estimates that the cost for construction of a similar structure to Offa's Dyke would run into the tens of millions of pounds.
May 11: 166 people are killed in a collision between two Japanese ferries.
May 12: A tense stand-off between Chilean and Bolivian airships over the Andes ends after three days and nights.
May 13: The Ministry of Food's strategic stockpile of foodstuffs reaches 16.4 million tons, including sufficient tea supply for 18 months.
May 14: France conducts an atomic bomb test with a yield of 246kt at the Reggane test site in the Algerian Sahara.
May 15: The German Army's Tank Design Committee issues design specifications for a 50t modern main battle tank and a 75t heavy battle tank. The former will be armed with a 105mm gun based on the Royal Ordnance L7 and the latter with an improved version of the 128mm KwK L/55 used on the wartime Tiger II heavy tanks. Development details of a rumoured 100t superheavy tank remains top secret.
May 16: King Baldwin of Belgium arrives in the Belgian Congo for a royal tour of the colony.
May 17: An operational test of a new galehorn by the British Army results in the partial destruction of a model village.
May 18: Establishment of the Central American Union, a wide-reaching intergovernmental political and defence cooperation agreement.
May 19: First flight of the Sud Aviation Caravelle jet airliner.
May 20: The Argentine Parliament approves the official separation of church and state.
May 21: President Thompson conducts his first foreign state visit, arriving in Canada to great fanfare.
May 22: Reformation of the Imperial Japanese Army's elite Samurai Division.
May 23: A USAF F-100 pilot shoots down a Chinese MiG-15 off the coast of Korea after it enters prohibited air space.
May 24: Release of The Dam Busters, a Technicolour war epic telling the story of 617 Squadron and Operation Chastise, to great acclaim in London.
May 25: Successful ascent of Kangchenjunga, the third highest mountain in the world.
May 26: Sir Anthony Eden leads the Conservative Party to a resounding victory in the British General Election, winning 389 seats, to the Liberals 140, Labour 117, the Nationals 32, Imperialists 26, Radicals 20, Socialists 13 and Independents 12.
May 27: First flight of the Convair F-106 supersonic interceptor.
May 28: Pope Pius XII describes the struggle against communism as a holy war.
May 29: Return of the US Army National Guard 28th and 43rd Infantry Divisions from Germany, where they had been deployed since late 1951 as part of the Korean War defensive build-up.
May 30: Tunisia is granted internal self government by France.
May 31: French aviatrix Jacqueline Auriol sets a women′s world speed record of 769 mph in a Mystere IV.

June
June 1: HAPAG general director Albert Ballin retires for the third and final time at the age of 98.
June 2: Yugoslavia and Austria-Hungary sign the Treaty of Belgrade, formalizing defensive ties against the growing Soviet threat.
June 3: An American expedition to a remote Indian ocean island captures a monstrous ape.
June 4: The Soviet secret police and intelligence service is formally renamed the KGB (Komitet Gosudarstvennoy Bezopasnosti or Committee for State Security)
June 5: New York Yankees star Mickey Mantle hits a record 632' home run off Billy Pearce.
June 6: The Children and Young Persons (Harmful Publications) Act comes into effect, motivated by the increased popularity of horror comics.
June 7: Debut of The $64,000 Question on CBS Television.
June 8: Celebration of the 1000th anniversary of the establishment of the halfling region of Hartshire in England.
June 9: Scientists report the first separation of a virus into its component parts.
June 10: The strength of the British Civil Defence Corps reaches 865,000 personnel.
June 11: 83 people are killed and over 100 injured after two race cars collide at Le Mans.
June 12: Three British academics publish a paper suggesting that the reconstitution of the Holy Roman Empire could serve as one means of defending Europe against external aggression.
June 13: Opening of the Mir diamond mine in the Soviet Union.
June 14: The Fairey Delta supersonic fighter enters operational service with the Royal Air Force.
June 15: Australia scores a record 758/8 against the West Indies at Kingston.
June 16: HMS Sidon is sunk in an accident that kills 13 crew in Portland Harbor after an explosion of an experimental high speed torpedo. Refloating and repair will take until February 1956.
June 17: The average price of a colour television in the United States is recorded as $79.99, while the average cost of a new automobile is $1360.
June 18: Discussions between dwarven communities and the Ministry of Defence regarding the use of underground settlements for mass civilian shelters in the event of general atomic war reach a satisfactory resolution.
June 19: Newsreel broadcasts of the new Ch'ing-Lung medium tank of the Imperial Chinese Army spark intense speculation as to its attributes.
June 20: The longest total solar eclipse for over 9 centuries darkens much of South East Asia.
June 21: Protests against Portuguese colonial rule begin in Goa.
June 22: Soviet fighters shoot down a USN patrol plane over the Bering Strait. The Soviet response surprises the Western world as they issue a statement of regret and offer to pay half damages.
June 23: Establishment of the Argentine National Petroleum Corporation.
June 24: Persian diplomats begin a new round of talks with British colonial officials regarding a renegotiation of the Anglo-Persian Treaty.
June 25: Destruction of the last major field force of the Malayan Races Liberation Army in the swamps of Teluk Anson.
June 26: Arctic explorers find the ruins of an icy palace in the mountains of Spitsbergen.
June 27: First legislation passed on the use of seat belts in automobiles in Illinois.
June 28: Mass surrender of former Mau-Mau fighters in Kenya.
June 29: First overseas deployment of combat forces of the United States Presidential Guard Regiment since the Second World War, as one company is assigned to the headquarters of US Army Europe.
June 30: The Ministry of Power, the Royal Atomic Energy Commission and British Energy publish a study outlining the development of the British electrical power industry over the next 20 years, including a plan for the construction of 52 nuclear power stations across Britain and Ireland.

July
July 1: Lord Wooster arrives in Washington for consultations with Secretary of State Dulles.
July 2: The largest collection of intact Inca quipu to date are recovered from caverns high in the Andes.
July 3: A toad motorist is fined £250 for repeated speeding offences by a Berkshire magistrate.
July 4: Legislative elections in Mexico lead to a strong victory by the National Party over the Liberal government.
July 5: A USAF study recommends the formation of a mobile rapid deployment air striking force capable of responding to global emergencies.
July 6: British and Indian troops complete the clearance of a large underground complex infested by hobgoblins on the North West Frontier, suffering 32 casualties in the week-long operation.
July 7: Commissioning of the USN's second atomic submarine, USS Seawolf.
July 8: The Midnight Shadow, a notorious gentleman thief wanted all over Europe, escapes a dogged pursuit by Metropolitan Police detectives over the rooftops of Limehouse, yet again.
July 9: Lufthansa begins its first regular jet services to London and Paris, employing de Havilland Comets.
July 10: Britain experiences its twelfth consecutive day above 70 degrees; the heatwave has sent many Englishmen and their perturbed dogs questing for relief at the seaside.
July 11: The first group of twelve CIA pilots complete training on the Lockheed U-2 high altitude reconnaissance plane and are prepared for their initial flights over Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. The U-2 is capable of flying at altitudes well above 75,000ft, well above the current ceiling of Soviet interceptors.
July 12: A Mexican passenger ship sinks off Veracruz in suspicious circumstances.
July 13: Execution by hanging of Ruth Ellis for murder in HM Prison Holloway.
July 14: France unveils its latest battle rockets at the Bastille Day Parade in Paris.
July 15: 18 Nobel laureates issue the Mainau Declaration, warning of the dangers of atomic war.
July 16: Opening of the Disneyland fairy tale theme park in Anaheim, California.
July 17: Sterling Moss wins the British Grand Prix at the Ainslee Circuit.
July 18: Winterborne St Martin records the highest rainfall in a 24 hour period in the British Isles with a 12" downpour.
July 19: Cecil Rhodes dies in Cape Town, aged 102. His death is marked by mourning across South Africa and the British Empire and is described by many as the end of an era.
July 20: Publication of The Return of the King, the final volume in Professor J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings.
July 21: Opening of the Yarkon Project to supply water to the Negev Desert in Israel.
July 22: President Thompson arrives in Panama City for the Tenth International Conference of American States.
July 23: Mau-Mau leader Dedan Kimathi is captured by a police patrol in Kenya.
July 24: An intrepid 4 year old girl becomes lodged in the barrel of Dora, the former Nazi German superheavy railway gun on display at the Royal Artillery Museum at Woolwich, London. The unfortunate explorer is rescued by the London Fire Brigade an hour later.
July 25: The MiG-19 supersonic fighter enters service with the Soviet Air Force. It goes some way towards bridging the qualitative gap between the East and West, but Soviet jet technology remains a substantive distance behind that of America and Britain, with both now fielding Mach 2 capable fighters.
July 26: The Labour Party is returned to power in the Israeli General Election, winning 52 out of 125 seats in the Knesset.
July 27: A friendly spectacled Peruvian bear is rescued from abandonment at Paddington Station by a kindly London family.
July 28: The first Interlingua Congress in Tours leads to the foundation of the Union Mundial pro Interlingua.
July 29: Protests against the British Army's use of war lions are rebutted in an extensive BBC interview with the chiefs of two battle prides.
July 30: The Soviet Union conducts an atomic test of a new experimental torpedo warhead at Semipalatinsk.
July 31: Five Swiss socialites drown in a cauldron of molten Emmental in a tragic fondue accident.

August
August 1: Sweden, Norway and Denmark establish a combined defence staff.
August 2: The Blackburn Buccaneer supersonic naval strike bomber enters test service with the Fleet Air Arm.
August 3: Air Vice Marshal Sir Guy Gibson V.C. is promoted to Air Officer Commanding, No. 1 Group RAF.
August 4: Construction begins on a new high security headquarters for the CIA in Langley, Virginia.
August 5: Beginning of the Korean national plebiscite under international supervision.
August 6: Dedan Kimathi is sentenced to death by hanging, drawing and quartering for treason in Nairobi.
August 7: Tokyo Telecommunications Engineering begins sales of transistor radios in Japan.
August 8: A Soviet pilot defects with his MiG-17 jet fighter to Bulgaria, where he is rewarded with $100,000 by CIA agents.
August 9: The Bristol Silver Shield Mk. IV anti-tank guided missile enters frontline service with the British Army of the Rhine.
August 10: French Lines' 154,000t superliner SS France departs on her maiden Transatlantic voyage from Le Havre.
August 11: Two USAF C-119 Boxcars collide in midair near Stuttgart, Germany, killing 66 troops and crew on board.
August 12: The minimum wage in the United States is raised from 80 cents to $1.00.
August 13: King Zod of Albania announces that his state will be the most powerful in Europe within five years.
August 14: Four Manchester children are taken on a fantastical journey through a long forgotten elven gate into faerie.
August 15: Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia arrives in Washington DC on a state visit.
August 16: The War Office announces that two British divisions will be withdrawn from Germany to Britain by the end of the year in the light of increased German self-defence capacity.
August 17: Five Poles are killed in two separate incidents as they attempt to cross the Polish-Ruritanian border, a deadly toll that continues to add to the Iron Wall's sinister reputation.
August 18: A mutiny in the Sudan Defence Force is swiftly suppressed by the British garrison battalions.
August 19: Hurricane Diane hits the northeastern United States, killing over 200 people and inflicting almost $1 billion in damage.
August 20: Anti-French riots sweep Morocco, with dozens of buildings being burnt in Fez and Casablanca and hundreds killed in the violence.
August 21: Dedan Kimathi is executed at Kamiti Prison in Nairobi.
August 22: 11 schoolchildren are killed when a freight train hits their school bus in Spring City, Tennessee.
August 23: The United States raises import duties on bicycles by 50%
August 24: Two aircraft carriers are laid down in Japan under high levels of security.
August 25: The results of the Korean plebiscite are announced, with 82% voting for reunification as an independent state.
August 26: Anak Krakatoa begins to grow rapidly as it enters a cycle of continual erupitve activity.
August 27: A New York traffic jam results in effective gridlock for 2 hours.
August 28: Opening of a large new RAF airfield on St. George's Island in the Indian Ocean.
August 29: A specialized prototype English Electric Lightning supersonic fighter sets a new altitude record for a jet aircraft, reaching 100,236ft.
August 30: The League of Nations Korean Supervisory Commission declares that reunification will take place on January 1st, 1956, followed by national elections to determine the government.
August 31: A Pan American Boeing 707 disappears off the coast of Florida while en route from Miami to Rio de Janeiro.

September
September 1: British elder stateman Sir Joseph Austen Chamberlain, KG dies aged 92 in London.
September 2: Greek Cypriot protests against British colonial rule in Cyprus proceed amid careful observation.
September 3: A British pilot becomes the first man to successfully eject from an aircraft on the ground, surviving his escape from a Gloster Javelin travelling at 150mph along a runway.
September 4: Soviet biological scientists announce that they have successfully bred a new hybrid dinosaur.
September 5: Official formation of the Imperial Defence Staff, a combined general staff representing the land, sea and air forces of Britain and her Crown Colonies, the Dominions and India. This is the first of several recommendations of the Committee of Imperial Defence regarding the integration of forces under joint Commonwealth command.
September 6: Riots in Constantinople are suppressed by the Varangian Guard
September 7: German counter-intelligence agents arrest 15 suspected Soviet spies.
September 8: Opening of the world's largest movie theatre in Los Angeles.
September 9: Completion of the second stage of construction of Queen Elizabeth Station in orbit around the Earth.
September 10: The Western series Gunsmoke debuts on CBS television.
September 11: Juan Fangio continues his tremendous winning form, this time triumphing at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.
September 12: Great Khan Temur of Mongolia declares that revolutionary socialism and Mongolian independence are not incompatible and any who make such a contention will be boiled alive.
September 13: Soviet wizards of the SKV (Soyuz Krasnyy Volshebnik) report a breakthrough in successfully counteracting lycanthropy, to the considerable scepticism of their Western counterparts.
September 14: Pope Pius XII elevates many Apostolic vicariates in Africa to the status of Metropolitan Archdioceses.
September 15: Airfix produces their first scale model aircraft kit, a 1/72 Supermarine Spitfire.
September 16: Release of Sword of Freedom, a Civil War epic film starring Ronald Reagan, James Stewart, Audie Murphy, Olivia de Havilland and Grace Kelly.
September 17: Melbourne defeat Collingwood in the VFL Grand Final at the MCG in front of 123,574 spectators.
September 18: Discovery of a new cavern containing ancient scrolls at Qumran.
September 19: Hurricane Hilda kills 358 people in Mexico.
September 20: Establishment of the Australian Rangers, a long range reconnaissance light infantry force for the defence of Northern Australia.
September 21: Glenn Miller reaches the top of the US charts with his latest composition 'Feelin' Fine'.
September 22: The Imperial Byzantine Navy marks the 2435th anniversary of the Battle of Salamis with solemn ceremonies off Piraeus.
September 23: Israeli agents assassinate two fugitive Nazis in Montevideo.
September 24: A proposal to lift restrictions on imports from Japan to the British Empire is abandoned due to a lack of support.
September 25: Establishment of the Royal Jordanian Air Force.
September 26: Marriage of Eddie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds, dubbed by many as 'America's sweethearts'.
September 27: Birdseye begins sales of frozen fish fingers across Britain.
September 28: The Indonesian Communist Party wins the second largest number of seats in Indonesia's legislative elections.
September 29: USAF weather planes begin new cloud seeding experiments over Kansas.
September 30: Hollywood actor James Dean is paralyzed and disfigured in a terrible car accident near Cholame, California.

October
October 1: Talks in Samarkand between the Soviet Union and the Empire of China regarding the future of Tartary break down.
October 2: Deactivation of the ENIAC computing engine at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland.
October 3: Two suspected Mau-Mau bases are destroyed by RAF airstrikes and rocket attacks in Kenya.
October 4: The Brooklyn Dodgers win the 1955 World Series, defeating the New York Yankees 2–0 in the seventh game.
October 5: A combined task force from New Avalon begins deployment to Britain as part of major Commonwealth global defence exercises.
October 6: Launch of the Citroen DS at the Paris Motor Show.
October 7: A Royal Canadian Mounted Police patrol discovers the fragments of a strange newly impacted meteorite in the Yukon.
October 8: First U-2 missions flown over the Soviet Union.
October 9: Reports of a strange plague in the hinterlands of Haiti reach the outside world.
October 10: USN helicopters assist in rescue operations for Mexicans stranded by flooding in Tampico.
October 11: A scientific exhibition to explore the so-called Lost Plateau of the Venezuelan Amazon disappears without a trace.
October 12: Commissioning of the supercarrier USS Chesapeake (CVA-62).
October 13: Confirmation of the existence of antiprotons in an experiment at the Bevatron particle accelerator at UCLA Berkeley.
October 14: A duel between two Martian ambassadors disrupts daytime commerce in the Strand.
October 15: Reopening of the Hamburg State Opera House with a performance of Mozart's The Magic Flute.
October 16: President Thompson announces a sweeping economic programme to balance the budget, cut marginal rates of taxation and end price and wage controls.
October 17: The Soviet battleship Comintern strikes a mine off Sevastopol and is heavily damaged.
October 18: Joint Arab League military exercises in Syria and Egypt gain significant public attention across the Middle East.
October 19: The Texan Supreme Court commutes the death sentence of 'The Man who Could Not Die' to life imprisonment, after further attempts at electrocution and hanging have no effect.
October 20: British and Australian strategic bombers conduct overflights of Indonesian territory en route between Singapore and Darwin as part of a show of force.
October 21: Chivu Stoica becomes Prime Minister of Romania.
October 22: A foreign businessman is fined 5 guineas for wearing white brogues in public by a London magistrate.
October 23: Secret testing of a double-barreled self-propelled howitzer begins at Woomera.
October 24: Establishment of the Serengeti National Park in Tanganyika, due in no small part to the vigorous advocacy of Sir Denys Finch Hatton.
October 25: A Yorkshire inventor announces that he and his dog have successfully flown a cavorite rocket to Luna and back.
October 26: Canada conducts an atomic bomb test at Christmas Island in the Pacific, signalling its position as the second atomic power of the British Empire.
October 27: The 96th Indian Scouts Regiment is deployed to the Philippines in response to the continuing Communist backed insurgency.
October 28: Belgian workers win the right to a 45 hour week.
October 29: Premier performance of Dmitri Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 by the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra.
October 30: The Swiss federal election results in victory for the Social Democratic Party, winning 61 seats out of 198.
October 31: Research begins on the means to extend the range of coastal and heavy artillery

November
November 1: United Airlines Flight 629 is destroyed in flight over Longmont, Colorado by a time bomb planted by John Gilbert Graham in an attempt to murder his mother for insurance purposes.
November 2: Stalin orders the repatriation of Poles from the Soviet Union after discussions with General Secretary Gomulka.
November 3: Opening of the Rimutaka Tunnel in New Zealand, which becomes the longest in the southern hemisphere with a length of 6 miles.
November 4: Long-time Brazilian Premier Getulio Vargas announces his retirement. He will remain a powerful influence on the political life of the Empire of Brazil.
November 5: Racial segregation is outlawed on trains and buses in the remaining four Southern states of the USA where it remained legal.
November 6: Two septuagenarian prospectors discover a huge uranium deposit near Hawks Crag on the west coast of New Zealand, sparking a radioactive minerals rush.
November 7: Construction of the first offshore oil platform in the United States is completed in Galveston, Texas.
November 8: Public unveiling of the world's first automaton bathtub in a home wares exhibition in London.
November 9: A Soviet diplomat defects to the United States in Constantinople.
November 10: Two battleships are laid down in Kobe and Kure in the most notable step in Japanese rearmament yet taken.
November 11: Romanian security services arrest 37 alleged Western spies in a major crackdown on public dissent.
November 12: German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer dies aged 79 in Berlin.
November 13: Launch of the battlecruiser Monitor at Newport News. The first of its class, it will carry a combined gun and missile armament and is set to displace over 87,000t at full load.
November 14: Kaiser Wilhelm appoints Ludwig Erhard as Adenauer's successor.
November 15: Fu Manchu is reappointed Imperial Chancellor of China.
November 16: The satellite town of Elizabeth in established to the north of Adelaide, South Australia.
November 17: Completion of expansion of the naval base at Port Royal, Jamaica, which is now the largest in the West Indies.
November 18: First successful test flight of the US Army's Jupiter long range ballistic missile.
November 19: Stanisław Mackiewicz is elected to a second term as Prime Minister of the Polish government in exile.
November 20: Arrival of the famed Iroquois Regiment of the Canadian Army in Malaya to replace the two battalions currently deployed there.
November 21: England defeat Germany 3-2 in a friendly game at Olympic Stadium in Berlin.
November 22: The American Indian population is recorded as 1.2% of the total populace of the United States.
November 23: Rhodesian miners uncover a massive diamond in mines in the south of the country.
November 24: Western diplomats in Moscow note that Stalin appears healthy and reinvigorated in recent public appearances.
November 25: A loud performance of Richard Strauss's Also sprach Zarathustra breaks several dozen windows in Vienna.
November 26: Giant wolves terrorise villages in Northern Persia.
November 27: General Moshe Dayan is appointed as Chief of Staff of the Israeli Army.
November 28: The Soviet Union and Indonesia sign an agreement regarding the supply of naval vessels, aircraft and armoured vehicles.
November 29: Premier Charles de Gaulle declares negotiations at Geneva on Indochina have come to a satisfactory conclusion.
November 30: First flight of the prototype Black Prince ballistic missile at the Upington Rocket Test Base in South Africa.

December
December 1: The Atlantic cod catch for 1955 is registered as the highest on record.
December 2: French and Moroccan officials sign the Franco-Moroccan Agreement, paving the way to the end of the French protectorate in April of next year.
December 3: Fire sweeps through the slum districts of Sofia, inflicting heavy damage.
December 4: Germany is admitted to the League of Nations as an observer state.
December 5: Issuing of the Geneva Accords on Indochina, which call for the separation of Vietnam into two states with a plebiscite to follow on unification in accordance with the successful Korean model. French forces will withdraw south of the 17th Parallel and a demilitarized zone established between the two interim states.
December 6: Death of Duke Carl Gustaf Emil Mannerheim, heroic victor of the Winter War and father of modern Finland. The King of Finland declares three days of national mourning.
December 7: A young ogre child becomes the first golden ogre in centuries after a noble deed.
December 8: Release of The Ladykillers, an Ealing Studios black comedy starring Alec Guinness.
December 9: Former U.S. Vice President Atticus Finch is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to secure world peace, particularly in regard to his role with the Korean Supervisory Commission.
December 10: A sorcerously-assisted bank robbery in Japan nets 100 million yen.
December 11: Kaiser Otto of Austria-Hungary arrives in Germany for the first state visit by an Austro-Hungarian head of state since before the First World War.
December 12: The vestiges of the Malayan Communist Party and Malayan Races Liberation Army begin surrender negotiations with British colonial officials.
December 13: Former US Secretary of Magic Harry Houdini begins a celebrated lecture tour of North America.
December 14: American adventurers expose and destroy a cult that is attempting to summon an eldritch abomination in Cairo.
December 15: The discovery of a magnificent treasure hoard in Southern Mexico sparks off a rush of eager exploration of Maya ruins.
December 16: Queen Elizabeth II opens a new terminal at Heathrow Airport.
December 17: Outbreak of the Mlubz War on Venus.
December 18: A report claims that a grand total of 8,924,856 automobiles were sold in the United States during 1955.
December 19: Major George Flashman is expelled from Madagascar after an unfortunate incident with two of the Queen's ladies-in-waiting.
December 20: Cardiff is proclaimed the official capital of Wales.
December 21: Italian economic growth reaches its highest level since the Second World War.
December 22: American cytogeneticist Joe Hin Tjio discovers the correct number of human chromosomes, forty-six.
December 23: Portugal and India agree to a framework for talks on the future of Portuguese India.
December 24: A Soviet long range rocket explodes on the launch pad at a test in Kazakhstan and the resultant explosion killing dozens of scientists, engineers and military officials.
December 25: Queen Elizabeth II emphasises the importance of peace and liberty in her Royal Christmas Message to the British Empire and pays tribute to those serving in Malaya and Kenya.
December 26: A survey finds that roast turkey has overtaken beef as the favourite main course for American Christmas dinners, albeit by a small margin.
December 27: Colonial officials in the South Pacific report the incidence of what will later be described as cargo cults.
December 28: Australia beats the United States 5-0 to win the 44th Davis Cup in New York City.
December 29: Formation of the Liberal Party of Ottoman Turkey.
December 30: Maiden flight of the Saab 35 Draken supersonic interceptor in Sweden.
December 31: Discovery of the Cave of Swallows in Mexico.


Last edited by Simon Darkshade on Mon Jun 12, 2017 4:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 1:47 am 
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Simon Darkshade wrote:
September 27: Birdseye begins sales of frozen fish fingers across Britain.

This being Dark Earth, I wouldn't entirely rule out the possibility of Birdseye recently having discovered a kind of fish that does, in fact, have fingers.... :?

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 2:01 am 
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That would be altogether too bony to work as a mass market frozen food at this time and the consumption of mermen and mermaids has been illegal since 1724.


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 Post subject: Re: Dark Earth Timeline
PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 3:20 am 
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February 12: NYPD detectives, paladins and sorcerers destroy a vampire lair hidden deep beneath the subways of New York City, bringing an end to their reign of terror.


Was one of them a young Greek-American detective named Theo?

Quote:
May 24: Release of The Dam Busters, a Technicolour war epic telling the story of 617 Squadron and Operation Chastise, to great acclaim in London.


Now that would have been awesome in colour.
Quote:
July 31: Five Swiss socialites drown in a cauldron of molten Emmental in a tragic fondue accident.


Well that wasn't a very fun-do then. :lol:

Quote:
September 11: Juan Fangio continues his tremendous winning form, this time triumphing at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza.


Only because Jim Clark isn't around quite yet. ;)

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November 6: Two septuagenarian prospectors discover a huge uranium deposit near Hawks Crag on the west coast of New Zealand, sparking a


A what?

Out of interest has George Smiley appeared yet?

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 4:16 am 
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Thanks for the interesting questions, Bernard.

1.) Excellent pick up on Kojak, who was involved alongside Carl Kolchak.

2.) I've seen a colourised version of the opening credits of the Dambusters and was watching the original last night while writing that part. With the use of colour, slightly more advanced special effects and some use of models/illusions, it would be quite the awesome experience. I'll have to put together a little factfile on alternate film versions at some point, similar to the one Trekchu did on TLW and Star Trek.

3.) Now that was just cheesy.

4.) Jim Clark will definitely have a great deal of success.

4.) Darn, I thought I had caught all incomplete entries this time. That should read 'a radioactive minerals rush' and I shall fix it. It happened historically, although they didn't end up finding anything worthwhile mining; here it will be a bit different.

George Smiley appeared in an early 1947 story as an SIS operative in Berlin setting up a fake murder to facilitate the 'defection' of a British agent to the Soviets. Control himself appeared in the Murder on the Orient Express story, fiddling around in Yugoslav politics. By 1955, Smiley is rising up through the ranks of the Circus and is finding himself involved in a lot of very convoluted operations and gambits. He also has a cordial dislike of James Bond, who seems to bring altogether too much attention to himself and the service.

There is one very big plot point regarding the Circus and their assets that has been sprinkled around the timeline.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:09 am 
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I do enjoy your timeline, thanks for the update :)

1) A skeletal corpse clutching a well-preserved Atlantean sword. Could it be Cohen the Bavarian or whatever he is called? ;) Or is it just the moldy guy Conan picked his sword up from in the movie?

2) Ronald Reagan getting an Oscar. The Oscars must be worth even less than they are in @ :mrgreen:

3) German counterintelligence even halfway competent? This scenario truly is too ASB by half!

4) Kaiser Wilhelm makes Erhard chancellor. Now which numeral does this Willy have after his name?

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 5:38 am 
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I'd forgotten about Smiley's appearance and I agree he would not like Bond. Too much shooting, s*agging for his liking. :lol:

Reagan was not actually a bad actor. I've seen him in films where he put in a very good performance, The Killers is a good example. But all everybody remembers is Bedtime for Bonzo. It's a bit like judging Sean Connery by Zardoz.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 6:09 am 
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Much obliged, Jotun. Always nice to see some interest in the background developments of the world that flesh out the broad canvas on which the various stories take place.

1.) The skeleton is Conan himself, indicating that this universe's Robert E. Howard had got his information from somewhere.

2.) The Oscars aren't necessarily worthless, nor was Reagan's acting that bad, particularly his 1940s roles, as Bernard observes. The scripts and roles to suit him weren't there by the 1950s and there had been certain changes in acting style which turn out slightly differently here.

The Liberators is a film with a fair bit of scope to it, telling the story of a US infantry platoon and its experiences through Portugal and Spain (which fills the role of the North African campaign), Italy, France, Belgium and Germany. John Wayne plays the role of the rough, tough as nails sergeant with the heart of gold and Reagan the young lieutenant who grows through his own doubts and trials to become a respected leader. Think of it as a 1950s Technicolour combination of Band of Brothers and The Big Red One, albeit one that follows the Film Production Code and reflects the Korean war period when it was conceived and made.

3.) German counterintelligence has a different position and is facing a different threat, what with the lack of the same 'East Germany' or a divided Berlin. There will be more to come out as this develops and I want to create the substance and semblance of a different, united Germany. The German Democratic Republic/Prussia (the names are used interchangeably in general parlance) is East Prussia and is separated from the rest of Germany by Poland. That changes a few dynamics in and of itself.

4.) Kaiser Wilhelm IV. He makes Erhard chancellor in the same way as the British monarch appoints the Prime Minister, with Germany having been a constitutional monarchy since the restoration of sovereignty. Its 16 states comprise Bavaria, Prussia, Saxony, Baden, Wurttemberg, Hanover, Rhineland, Westphalia, Hesse, Mecklenberg, Holstein, Thurungia, Hamburg, Berlin, Bremen and Aachen.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 6:13 am 
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Bernard Woolley wrote:
I'd forgotten about Smiley's appearance and I agree he would not like Bond. Too much shooting, s*agging for his liking. :lol:

Reagan was not actually a bad actor. I've seen him in films where he put in a very good performance, The Killers is a good example. But all everybody remembers is Bedtime for Bonzo. It's a bit like judging Sean Connery by Zardoz.


You're almost tempting me to write a short piece involving the two of them. It would have to be set a little later down the line if I wanted to bring in Harry Palmer as well, as I've already used him as a 12/13 year old in 1947.

Zardoz...Blech. If I want a proper post-apocalyptic masterpiece featuring characters running around in loincloths, then I'll stick to the best - Yor, the Hunter from the Future.

I put one event into 1955 based on something you asked about in another thread...


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I just now had an idea...what about introducing Kaiser Friedrich Barbarossa at one time in the future (don't know if you are planning on another conflict where Germany is in dire straits, maybe on the side of the good guys) since according to legend he is sleeping under the Kyffhäuser mountain in eastern Germany until the day when he is needed again.

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It is scary sometimes how close you chaps come to reading my mind and notes. Barbarossa under the mountain plays quite a large role in one of the 1947 stories I've got planned for Part 10.

As for another conflict with Germany on the side of the West...that is something else planned for later down the line. I better get a move on and write some of these.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:21 am 
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8-)

Looking forward to it!

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Thanks; always pleased to see that some enjoy the work and the world.

I'll add some general notes in due course, as well as some national write ups and a few more 'Where Are They Now?' entries, but for now, some broad trends:

- The Far Eastern wars seem to be winding down, albeit in some rather different ways. The attention of the world is shifting back to Europe, not that it ever really left.
- Africa, South America and the Middle East are becoming more restive
- Rearmament of Germany and Japan is fully underway, as is a split between the USSR and China.
- American and British interests are diverging in a number of areas.
- Stalin is an unknown factor which changes a lot of geopolitical considerations
- Many mundane, familiar and even bemusing events are occurring at the same time as great deeds and nation shaking decisions, as they ever do.
- Domestic developments in the USA are turning out quite differently, particularly with regard to an earlier and gradual resolution of the questions of Civil Rights.
- Sone familiar faces are departing or have not even made it on stage.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 12:35 pm 
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Great stuff!

There seems to be a lot of groundings. My google fu is weak today. Are these significant in some way?

Quote:
June 26: Arctic explorers find the ruins of an icy palace in the mountains of Spitsbergen.


Were there echoes of some disturbingly blonde lady singing "Let it go, let it go...."?

I like the King Kong, Paddington, Narnia and Wind in the Willows references as well.

About the only thing that annoys me about your universe is your insistence that Alaska be part of the Empire. *grin*

What's all this about Stalin appearing "healthy and invigorated"? Is there some kind of vampirism or something going on there? Or cloning?

And what's a golden ogre? Is that like a golden dragon?

Once again, great stuff!

Belushi TD


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 12, 2017 7:53 pm 
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Thanks, Belushi. You've picked up on some important points.

1.) The aircraft crashes are historical, by and large. There will be some further significance to this as time goes by, though...

2.) Frozen? No! In the name of God, no! I have no dealings with Disney nonsense; I think the last cartoon of theirs I saw was The Black Cauldron. It was a reference to The Snow Queen and there will be more.

3.) The various fictional references are all coming together, albeit very slowly.

4.) Alaska is simply a natural consequence of the expanded Crimean War. The in-universe Americans are over the moon about it, but, after a century, it is considered part of Canada and everyone is quite chilled about it. ;)

5.) Stalin's condition has something unnatural about it and he did employ an artificial double for the Constantinople Summit. You're on the right track.

6.) I took the golden ogre reference from a lovely series of children's stories about Grogre the Ogre in Marshall Cavendish's Story Teller anthology from ~1983. A golden ogre is a transformed creature that has earned their status through a noble or altruistic deed. More will come on ogres and more in The Book of Beasts.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:36 am 
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[url]4.) Alaska is simply a natural consequence of the expanded Crimean War. The in-universe Americans are over the moon about it, but, after a century, it is considered part of Canada and everyone is quite chilled about it. ;)[/url]

Oh, I get it. I might have to have become a Canadian in your universe. *grin*

Looking forward to much, much more.

*edit* as far as the literary stuff goes, are you pondering a Heinlein-esque (The Number of the Beast) "Author as in universe demigod" that can bend reality to his wishes kind of thing? *end edit*

Belushi TD


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