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PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:42 am 
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US calls off surveillance of ISIS convoy stuck in the Syrian Desert
DEBKAFile

September 9, 2017, 10:31 AM (IDT) At Russia’s request, the US military on Friday called off its aerial surveillance of a convoy of Islamic State fighters stuck in the Syrian Desert for 10 days, saying it is now the responsibility of the Syrian government. The 17 buses carried ISIS fighters and their families out of the Lebanese-Syrian battle zone under a deal with Hizballah allowing them to withdraw and head for Deir ez-Zour near the Iraqi border.

Because Syrian troops are now in control of the area, the US-led coalition against the Islamic State agreed to a Russian request to halt the surveillance, in the interests of Russian-US-backed efforts at de-confliction, said Brig. Gen. Jon Braga, director of operations for the U.S.-led coalition in his statement. He added: “As always, we will do our utmost to ensure that the ISIS terrorists do not move toward the border of our Iraqi partners.” The US military also said it killed 85 fighters in the vicinity of the buses who were attempting to escape.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 09, 2017 7:49 am 
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jihadwatch.org Top Muslim scholar: “Stop pretending that orthodox Islam and violence aren’t linked”
Christine Douglass-Williams

This is a vitally important statement by Yahya Cholil Staquf, general secretary of the Nahdlatul Ulama in Indonesia. Nahdlatul Ulema, “with about 50 million members, is the country’s biggest Muslim organization.”

Judging from Staquf’s factual statement, it is clear that not all Muslims ascribe to a victimology narrative and the “Islamophobia” canard that generally accompanies it. Staquf states the obvious, which apparently is not that obvious to many Westerners.

When will the West wake up? The “Islamophobia” subterfuge is nothing but an Organization of Islamic Cooperation ploy to subjugate the woefully naive of this world. Do they actually believe that everyone who smiles at them is their “friend,” as committed as they are to “diversity”?

Acceptance, tolerance and goodwill are honorable concepts, but they are being hijacked by the malignant agendas of jihadists (including the stealth Muslim Brotherhood variety).

“In Interview, Top Indonesian Muslim Scholar Says Stop Pretending That Orthodox Islam and Violence Aren’t Linked”, by Marco Stahlhut, Time, September 7, 2017:


Indonesia, the world’s biggest Muslim-majority country, has a constitution that recognizes other major religions, and practices a syncretic form of Islam that draws on not just the faith’s tenets but local spiritual and cultural traditions. As a result, the nation has long been a voice of, and for, moderation in the Islamic world.

Yet Indonesia is not without its radical elements. Though most are on the fringe, they can add up to a significant number given Indonesia’s 260-million population. In the early 2000s, the country was terrorized by Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), a homegrown extremist organization allied with al-Qaeda. JI’s deadliest attack was the 2002 Bali bombing that killed 202 people. While JI has been neutralized, ISIS has claimed responsibility for recent, smaller terrorist incidents in the country and has inspired some Indonesians to fight in Syria — Indonesians who could pose a threat when they return home. The country has also seen the rise of hate groups that preach intolerance and violence against local religious and ethnic minorities, which include Shia and Ahmadiya Muslims.

Among Indonesia’s most influential Islamic leaders is Yahya Cholil Staquf, 51,advocates a modern, moderate Islam. He is general secretary of the Nahdlatul Ulama, which, with about 50 million members, is the country’s biggest Muslim organization. Yahya. This interview, notable for Yahya’s candor, was first published on Aug. 19 in German in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. Here are excerpts translated from the original Bahasa Indonesia into English.

Many Western politicians and intellectuals say that Islamist terrorism has nothing to do with Islam. What is your view?

Western politicians should stop pretending that extremism and terrorism have nothing to do with Islam. There is a clear relationship between fundamentalism, terrorism, and the basic assumptions of Islamic orthodoxy. So long as we lack consensus regarding this matter, we cannot gain victory over fundamentalist violence within Islam.

Radical Islamic movements are nothing new. They’ve appeared again and again throughout our own history in Indonesia. The West must stop ascribing any and all discussion of these issues to “Islamophobia.” Or do people want to accuse me — an Islamic scholar — of being an Islamophobe too?

What basic assumptions within traditional Islam are problematic?

The relationship between Muslims and non-Muslims, the relationship of Muslims with the state, and Muslims’ relationship to the prevailing legal system wherever they live … Within the classical tradition, the relationship between Muslims and non-Muslims is assumed to be one of segregation and enmity.

Perhaps there were reasons for this during the Middle Ages, when the tenets of Islamic orthodoxy were established, but in today’s world such a doctrine is unreasonable. To the extent that Muslims adhere to this view of Islam, it renders them incapable of living harmoniously and peacefully within the multi-cultural, multi-religious societies of the 21st century.

A Western politician would likely be accused of racism for saying what you just said.

I’m not saying that Islam is the only factor causing Muslim minorities in the West to lead a segregated existence, often isolated from society as a whole. There may be other factors on the part of the host nations, such as racism, which exists everywhere in the world. But traditional Islam — which fosters an attitude of segregation and enmity toward non-Muslims — is an important factor.

And Muslims and the state?

Within the Islamic tradition, the state is a single, universal entity that unites all Muslims under the rule of one man who leads them in opposition to, and conflict with, the non-Muslim world.

So the call by radicals to establish a caliphate, including by ISIS, is not un-Islamic?

No, it is not. [ISIS’s] goal of establishing a global caliphate stands squarely within the orthodox Islamic tradition. But we live in a world of nation-states. Any attempt to create a unified Islamic state in the 21st century can only lead to chaos and violence … Many Muslims assume there is an established and immutable set of Islamic laws, which are often described as shariah. This assumption is in line with Islamic tradition, but it of course leads to serious conflict with the legal system that exists in secular nation-states.

Any [fundamentalist] view of Islam positing the traditional norms of Islamic jurisprudence as absolute [should] be rejected out of hand as false. State laws [should] have precedence.

Generations ago, we achieved a de facto consensus in Indonesia that Islamic teachings must be contextualized to reflect the ever-changing circumstances of time and place. The majority of Indonesian Muslims were — and I think still are — of the opinion that the various assumptions embedded within Islamic tradition must be viewed within the historical, political and social context of their emergence in the Middle Ages [in the Middle East] and not as absolute injunctions that must dictate Muslims’ behavior in the present … Which ideological opinions are “correct” is not determined solely by reflection and debate. These are struggles [about who and what is recognized as religiously authoritative]. Political elites in Indonesia routinely employ Islam as a weapon to achieve their worldly objectives.

Is it so elsewhere too?

Too many Muslims view civilization, and the peaceful co-existence of people of different faiths, as something they must combat. Many Europeans can sense this attitude among Muslims.

There’s a growing dissatisfaction in the West with respect to Muslim minorities, a growing fear of Islam. In this sense, some Western friends of mine are “Islamophobic.” They’re afraid of Islam. To be honest, I understand their fear … The West cannot force Muslims to adopt a moderate interpretation of Islam. But Western politicians should stop telling us that fundamentalism and violence have nothing to do with traditional Islam. That is simply wrong.

They don’t want to foster division in their societies between Muslims and non-Muslims, nor contribute to intolerance against Muslims.

I share this desire — that’s a primary reason I’m speaking so frankly. But the approach you describe won’t work. If you refuse to acknowledge the existence of a problem, you can’t begin to solve it. One must identify the problem and explicitly state who and what are responsible for it.

Who and what are responsible?

Over the past 50 years, Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states have spent massively to promote their ultra-conservative version of Islam worldwide. After allowing this to go unchallenged for so many decades, the West must finally exert decisive pressure upon the Saudis to cease this behavior … I admire Western, especially European, politicians. Their thoughts are so wonderfully humanitarian. But we live in a time when you have to think and act realistically.

The last time I was in Brussels I witnessed some Arab, perhaps North African, youth insult and harass a group of policemen. My Belgian friends remarked that such behavior has become an almost everyday occurrence in their country. Why do you allow such behavior? What kind if impression does that make? Europe, and Germany in particular, are accepting massive numbers of refugees. Don’t misunderstand me: of course you cannot close your eyes to those in need. But the fact remains that you’re taking in millions of refugees about whom you know virtually nothing, except that they come from extremely problematic regions of the world……

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:15 am 
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I think this opens her up to Civil suits though...

dailycaller.com Trump JOJ Won't Prosecute Lois Lerner
Chuck RossReporter

The Justice Department says it will not prosecute former IRS executive Lois Lerner for targeting conservative groups during the 2010 and 2012 elections.

In a letter to top Republicans on the House Ways and Means Committee, Assistant Attorney General Kevin Boyd said that after a careful review of the case, DOJ will not pursue charges against Lerner, who oversaw the IRS division that reviewed tax exempt organizations.

“After this process, the Department determined that reopening the investigation would not be appropriate based on the available evidence,” Boyd wrote Texas Rep. Kevin Brady, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, and Illinois Rep. Peter Roskam, the chairman of the subcommittee on tax policy.

In April, Brady and Roskam asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to review the Lerner case and to consider whether she should be charged with a crime.

Lerner was accused of improperly targeting tea party affiliated groups by denying or stonewalling their applications for tax-exempt status.

Lerner, who has since retired from the IRS, pleaded the Fifth in two separate congressional hearings — one in 2013 and another in 2014. In 2014, the Ways and Means Committee referred Lerner to the Obama Justice Department for prosecution. Republicans on the panel accused her of obstructing justice and misleading Congress. The Obama DOJ declined prosecution in 2015.

Brady and Roskam blasted the DOJ’s latest decision.

“This is a terrible decision,” Brady said in a statement. “It sends the message that the same legal, ethical, and Constitutional standards we all live by do not apply to Washington political appointees — who will now have the green light to target Americans for their political beliefs and mislead investigators without ever being held accountable for their lawlessness.”

He said that while he has “the utmost respect” for Sessions, he is “troubled by his Department’s lack of action to fully respond to our request and deliver accountability.”

“Today’s decision does not mean Lois Lerner is innocent. It means the justice system in Washington is deeply flawed,” he added.

Roskam called the DOJ decision “a miscarriage of justice.”

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:18 am 
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Bill de Blasio: The Anti-New Yorker
American Greatness by Rabbi Avrohom Gordimer




In a local mayoral race that is drawing national media attention, incumbent New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is projected to win in a landslide. Yet at the same time, there is an eerie sense that de Blasio is quite vulnerable and is perhaps about to tumble down a political precipice.

De Blasio, whose radical background includes support for the Sandinista regime in Nicaragua and who is a weak, left wing ideologue in the spirit of Barack Obama, presents himself as the successful progressive and touts the introduction of free pre-K education and expansion of low-income housing as the hallmarks of his mayoral tenure. De Blasio never misses an opportunity to boast about New York City’s record-low crime rates, even as he fails to mention that crime rates in the city have been dropping for the past three decades, way before he come onto the scene, and even as he consistently attacks the people, policies, and practices actually responsible for the reduction in crime.

Despite having accomplished little, de Blasio is beloved by the liberal New York press, unions, and celebrities, who don’t question his achievements and who are enamored by his progressive pontifications.

One need not put forth much effort to peel the cheap paint off de Blasio’s mayoral tenure. Underneath the entity is full of rust, corrosion, and sports gaping holes.

Under de Blasio’s leadership, the quality of life in New York City has plummeted, subway crime is shooting up, homelessness has increased by about 40 percent (!), panhandling and public urination are out of control (no hyperlink needed—this writer, who lives in Manhattan, unfortunately can attest to this fact with a simple accounting of his daily observations), people are fleeing the city, businesses are shutting down, and the mayor is doing nothing to address the meltdown of the subway system.

There is plenty more. And with the New York City Council, at the behest of de Blasio and radical-left Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, decriminalizing “low-level offenses” such as public drunkenness, noise making, and public urination—and with Manhattan subway fare beaters no longer facing arrest—law and order are becoming things of the past.

Reflective of the reality and in contrast with de Blasio’s fake news accomplishments, his approval rating is way down; even liberal New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has no confidence in de Blasio.

These are all areas of extreme vulnerability for de Blasio. Yet there is a far more profound and innate reason why de Blasio, regardless of achievements, has no place leading the city and will never succeed as its mayor.

New York is famously known as “the city that never sleeps.” Rather than a designation of chronic citywide insomnia, this slogan describes an enterprise known for its hard and unstoppable productivity.

Such is the history of New York, which became the epicenter of and a global force in the areas of business, education, healthcare, culture, and much more, through superhuman work and incessant striving. Those who built New York were blessed with an insatiable drive to excel and to not be bound by natural limitations. Dreams were huge, and so was the effort invested to realize them.

When my ancestors arrived (legally) in Manhattan, fleeing persecution and poverty in Eastern Europe, they quickly became fluent in English as they toiled hard in order to pay for their own and for their children’s education. These people had a double schedule, laboring by day to pay for night school, or the reverse. There was no such thing as a 9-to-5 workday. Neither was there such a thing as settling for mediocrity. Sleep was scarce, and hard work and education were craved.

This is the narrative of the millions of New Yorkers who, by the grace of God, were welcomed to these shores a century ago from Ireland, Italy, Eastern Europe, and elsewhere. There were no social welfare programs to rely on; no multilingual education; no cushions. There was the blessing of opportunity for hard work and education, and resultant upward mobility.

It is the “never sleep” work ethic of generations past that made New York into a capital of eminence and prowess. And it is the disregard for and denigrating of this same work ethic that makes Bill de Blasio so unfit to lead.

Sleeping late and then being driven 12 miles in an SUV for a daily gym visit, and arriving at work close to 11 a.m., de Blasio is the antithesis of the Great New Yorker. Being tardy for numerous important events, reportedly taking daily naps at his office, and refusing to ride the subway except for rare occasions—in stark contrast with previous mayors—have alienated de Blasio from the city’s traditions. De Blasio is known for frequent vacations, even to the point of inviting criticism from Governor Cuomo and other fellow Democrats. In short, de Blasio is the anti-New Yorker par excellence, whose absence of work ethic and lack of accomplishments place him at odds with the spirit of greatness of past decades and centuries that built NYC.

In the Book of Proverbs (24:29-33), Solomon writes,

I will render to the man according to his work. I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding; And, lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down. Then I saw, and considered it well: I looked upon it, and received instruction. Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep: So shall thy poverty come as one that travelleth; and thy want as an armed man.

Although there are deep and beautiful layers of Talmudic exposition of these verses, the verses’ plain meaning depicts the man devoid of work ethic and the disastrous results of his lifestyle and attitude. I will stop here and let readers connect the dots and draw their own inevitable conclusions about the mayor.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:21 am 
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On the cover of Time Magazine
21 Power LinePower Line by Scott Johnson

I think Ilhan Omar is the first state legislator to have taken out a marriage certificate naming her brother as her husband. She is probably also the first state legislator to have taken out a marriage certificate naming her brother as her husband who also has a “cultural” husband as the father of her children.

When I sent Omar’s campaign a question or two about her marital arrangements last year, I received this response from Minneapolis criminal attorney Jean Brandl:

Dear Mr. Johnson:

I have been contacted by the Ilhan Omar campaign. Their response to your email from this morning is as follows:

“There are people who do not want an East African, Muslim woman elected to office and who will follow Donald Trump’s playbook to prevent it. Ilhan Omar’s campaign sees your superfluous contentions as one more in a series of attempts to discredit her candidacy.

Ilhan Omar’s campaign will not be distracted by negative forces and will continue to focus its energy on creating positive engagement with community members to make the district and state more prosperous and equitable for everyone.”

If you have any further questions regarding this matter, please direct them to me in writing so we have a record of any further communications.

Sincerely,

Jean Brandl

I had a few further questions that I directed to Brandl, but — surprise! — I never got a response. I haven’t taken it personally, though. She has not only failed to respond to questions from me, she has also failed to respond to interview requests from other local reporters with the Star Tribune, with Minnesota Public Radio and with local television news outlets.

The Star Tribune followed up on the story last year, for example, but Omar declined to be interviewed. Democratic operative Ben Goldfarb spoke to the Star Tribune on Omar’s behalf: “Allegations that she married her brother and is legally married to two people are categorically ridiculous and false.” Omar’s campaign explained that she had never legally married “cultural” husband Ahmed Hirsi and flatly denied that Ahmed Nur Said Elmi, the guy named on her Minnesota marriage certificate, is her brother.

Omar issued a statement that went back to the royal flush of bigotry accusations and decried the “Trump-style misogyny, racism, anti-immigration rhetoric and Islamophobic division” allegedly motivating questions about her marital status. When Star Tribune reporter Patrick Coolican requested a comment from me for his story, I asked him who Elmi is. “They won’t tell me,” he said.

I told the story as best I could in the City Journal column “The curious case of Ilhan Omar.” A year later, that curious case — it’s still curious.

Omar still isn’t giving interviews to members of the local media who might raise uncomfortable questions — not even now that she has been elected to the Minnesota House of Representatives.



Omar prefers the national media to the Minnesota locals. The national media treat her like a rock star. They come to praise her. They don’t ask uncomfortable questions. They seek to add to her renown.

In their eyes, with apologies to Shel Silverstein: She’s a big rock singer/She’s got golden fingers/But one thrill she’s just now seen/They put her on the cover of Time Magazine. With her own video!

Time celebrates Omar in an issue featuring women who have achieved various “Firsts.” Omar is held out as the “First Somali American Muslim person to become a legislator.” Omar views her election as one that “will shift the narrative about what is possible.” I can’t disagree with that.

The video includes a cameo appearance by President Trump in Minnesota on the Sunday before election day this past November. The video and interview with Omar are posted here.



In the interview published by Time, Omar presents herself as someone who has overcome double standards hobbling her progress:

People think of Minneapolis as a very liberal, progressive city. We have a lot of immigrants here. The incumbent I was running against was a trailblazer when it comes to women in politics, so you would think that my gender wouldn’t be a big issue. But everybody wanted to make that an issue. To her, people were excited to vote for me because I was pretty. To the Muslim and Somali communities, my gender was a problem because politics is supposed to be a man’s role. Then there was the typical stuff that women candidates deal with—as a mother, how irresponsible I must be to want to run and devote as much time out of the home. No one ever asks the male candidates who are also fathers how they expect to balance family life. Gender was a big thing.

The double standards she allegedly overcame are nothing compared to the double standards from which she has benefited. If Omar weren’t a Somali Muslim woman, she would have been expected to answer a few questions about her marital arrangements. If she were a conservative Republican, well, you know the rest of the story.

As it is, however, Omar has become a celebrity of international renown. She is celebrated by Time Magazine and other cultural arbiters. Her complicated marital situation goes without mention. She is held up as a role model. She is a First. Which she may be, if not precisely as Time means it.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 10, 2017 12:51 pm 
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What are the odds that a LOT more will now die, 'Attempting To Escape' ??

With NO independent witnesses, now the drone coverage has been pulled...

Part of me cries, 'War Crime'. The other side says, 'Foot & Mouth Cure'...

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:36 am 
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Eric wrote:
US calls off surveillance of ISIS convoy stuck in the Syrian Desert
DEBKAFile

September 9, 2017, 10:31 AM (IDT) At Russia’s request, the US military on Friday called off its aerial surveillance of a convoy of Islamic State fighters stuck in the Syrian Desert for 10 days, saying it is now the responsibility of the Syrian government. The 17 buses carried ISIS fighters and their families out of the Lebanese-Syrian battle zone under a deal with Hizballah allowing them to withdraw and head for Deir ez-Zour near the Iraqi border.

Because Syrian troops are now in control of the area, the US-led coalition against the Islamic State agreed to a Russian request to halt the surveillance, in the interests of Russian-US-backed efforts at de-confliction, said Brig. Gen. Jon Braga, director of operations for the U.S.-led coalition in his statement. He added: “As always, we will do our utmost to ensure that the ISIS terrorists do not move toward the border of our Iraqi partners.” The US military also said it killed 85 fighters in the vicinity of the buses who were attempting to escape.


Awww... when will there be another chance to set up another "Roach Motel" for ISIS?

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